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entry 12 Sep 2009, 03:32
Pietro Bordino


Pietro Bordino Bordino was born in Turin, November 22, 1887. The son of a Fiat caretaker he would spend his early years around the factory before he was given a job as a mechanic. In 1904 he would become a racing mechanic to the works drivers, Vincenzo Lancia and Felice Nazzaro. In 1908 he took the wheel himself at the Chateau Thierry hill-climb in France, winning on his first attempt. He would travel to England in 1911 for a series speed record attempts in an airship-engined Fiat but to know avail as the car was next to impossible to drive.

World War I would intercede just as his career was starting to take off. He Rejoined Fiat when the company decided to go racing again in 1921. In the first Italian Grand Prix on the old Montichiari circuit just outside of Brescia he set fastest lap at nearly 100 mph he failed to finish the race with a broken oil pipe after leading the early stages of the race. This would prove to be a pattern throughout his career. Described by none other but H. O. D. Segrave as "the finest road race driver in the world", his results never matched his abilities.

To read the rest of the article go here.

entry 6 Sep 2009, 22:30
Felice Nazzaro




He was called the sport's first racing super star when in 1925 he retired from frontline racing after two and one half decades. During that time he won all the great races of the day including the Targa Florio, the Kaiserpreise and the French Grand Prix, the initial trio all at the wheel of a Fiat. He won the latter twice with a war and an unprecedented 15 years separating victories.

To read the rest of the article go here.

entry 22 Aug 2006, 06:20
He seemed to be well positioned at Fiat, then the leading racing team but his friend Luigi Bazzi who had recently joined Enzo Ferrari at Alfa Romeo knew the ego that blazed inside Vittorio Jano could not be contained at the larger company. After the desultory results of the new Alfa P1, a Fiat copy no less, it was suggested by Bazzi that in order to succeed they needed to go to the source, they needed to kidnap “Jano”. It was a job that the equally ambitious Ferrari, a self-described troublemaker was born to. Yet Jano was not so easily moved, and according to legend he demanded a formal proposal from Alfa Romeo, imperiously dismissing Ferrari by stating that he would “speak to the organ grinder, not the monkey”. To the shock and dismay of his managers at Fiat, Vittorio was soon headed to Alfa Romeo.


To read the rest of the article go here.

entry 16 Aug 2006, 05:20
While the activity of sportsmen has been stagnating until the past few days, the fever of sporting enthusiasts has been increasing. European champions, most of whom can only drive for their factory team, would like to show themselves on the larger motor racing stage. The public eagerly awaits the renaissance - but does not know how, or when it will come.

Giovanni Canestrini

To read the rest of the article go here.

entry 23 Jul 2006, 04:49

The Grand Prix History website is built upon an extensive collection of motorsports books. Recently I added a book entitled; Grand Prix Championship Courses and Drivers by noted author Griffith Borgeson. The book was first published in 1968 and offered for the princely sum of $5.95.

It starts with a brief introduction to Grand Prix racing and ends with short sketches of the leading drivers of the day, but it was what was written between these sections, that caught my interest. While most if not all of this material was available in other books Borgeson has the ability to concisely describe the important while dispensing with the frivolous. I especially appreciated some of the dollar figures he referenced such as the average price of conducting a Grand Prix circa 1965 ($24,000), the average salary for a top-flight driver ($110,000-140,000) or even what it costs to stage a single first-class event ($150,000). These amounts seem almost ludicrous in our present day environment but have we since been given our money’s worth? I hazard to think not. Besides current venues a number of circuits that are not used today are also described, such as my personal favorites Zandvoort, Watkins Glen and Kyalami which the author brings back to life.

entry 8 Jul 2006, 15:37

To read more about the Auto Union Type D you
can view the article here.
Auto Union started the new season under a cloud. Professor Ferdinand Porsche's contract was not renewed after the 1937 season in a strange case of economics and was snapped up by Mercedes who fed his company several lucrative contracts. Just after the beginning of the year they lost their greatest driver when Bernd Rosemeyer was killed during a speed attempt. While Robert Eberan von Eberhorst assumed most of Porsche's duties there could be no replacement of the beloved Rosemeyer.
 

entry 7 Jul 2006, 17:59

To read more about the Auto Union Type C you can view
the article here.
The Fuhrer has spoken. The 1934 Grand Prix formula shall and must be a measuring stick for German knowledge and German ability. So one thing leads to the other: first the Fuhrer's overpowering energy, then the formula, a great international problem to which Europe's best devote themselves, and finally, action in the design and construction of new racing cars.

Nothing exemplified German Technology more so than the Type C and Resemeyer was their hero.
 

entry 5 Jul 2006, 05:18

To read more about the Mercedes W25 you can
view the article here.
As per their wont the Nazis set up an organization, the NSKK to control all motoring activities. Headed by Obergruppenfüher Adolf Huhnlein, the NSKK had authority over all German motorsport activity. Prior to this the Transport Ministry announced that they would pay 450,000 Reichsmarks to the firm that produced a Grand Car with bonus payments of 20,000, 10,000 and 5,000 for finishes 1st through 3rd.

Unfortunately for Daimler-Benz the party was crashed by Auto Union and the stipend would have to be shared by the two firms. Historically this was a third of the budget that Wilhelm Kissel, the Director at Daimler, had estimated and only 10% of what was actually spent each year. 
 

entry 29 Jun 2006, 02:54

To read more about the Mercedes SSKL you can view the article here.
The chief threat to a Bentley victory at the Tourist Trophy in Ireland was Caracciola’s 7-litre supercharged Mercedes SSK. The race was run according to handicap, the Bentley of Birkin having 2 laps in hand over the Mercedes. Starting under the threat of rain, it now came down in torrents.

It seemed a long while since I had seen the Mercedes, but as I came into the straight I heard the moaning of its supercharger behind. I put my foot down for all I was worth, but it was to no avail. We raced towards the grandstand; I saw the white bonnet with its silver star, and then Caracciola himself, staring ahead in his peaked cap, so close in the Mercedes left-hand drive that I could almost have touched him. For a second we were level, and then he was past heading for the Mountjoy corner, his spray flying up around my eyes.
Sir Henry ("Tim") Birkin

entry 26 Jun 2006, 01:31

To read more about the Mercedes W196 you can
view the article here.
I've now updated my article on the Mercedes W196 with wheelbase and track information as well as a few additional images.  
... there began what at Mercedes might be classed as a panic, with the solitary long-chassis streamliner's suspension being hastily jacked-up while the racing department in Stuttgart feverishly built two new long-chassis frames because all the experimentation had left them with only one long chassis on the inventory. By the end of the second official practice day at Monza the two new chassis were ready and they were whisked down to Milan on Mercedes' fabulous high-speed transporter which had been built for just such an emergency. This remarkable vehicle was an open-platform truck, big enough to carry one car, powered by a 210-bhp sports car engine and capable of cruising at over 100 mph.
Stirling Moss in My Cars, My Career  

entry 19 Jun 2006, 05:54

To read more about the Lotus-Ford 49 you can view
the article here.
I've now updated my article on the Lotus 49 with wheelbase and track information as well as a few additional images.

Interestingly this Lotus is more famous for its engine than any innovation with it's chassis. For maybe the first and last time in his life Chapman thought simple is better. Knowing that he was operating in a very short window as Ford had only promised him a one year exclusivity on the DFV may have colored his thinking. 

entry 13 Jun 2006, 23:56
From races cars to steam locomotives each will get you where you want to go. Only one allows you to appreciate the scenery though ...

SlotForum Posted Image
To see more pictures from a recent visit to the
Deutsche Bahn Museum in Nurnburg, Germany go here.

entry 10 Jun 2006, 15:08
Besides motorsports, books, slot cars, trains and toy soldies I also collect stamps. What does the fastest sport in the world have to do with the slowest hobby? Nothing except when stamps are used to depict cars or famous drivers.

SlotForum Posted Image
To see more stamps go here.

entry 31 May 2006, 02:26

To read more about Peter Helck you can view
the article here.
I've now updated all my Artist Gallery articles and hope to add a couple more in the near future. Most have just been cleaned up but I added some more images by Peter Helck. Helck was there during the days of Louis Wagner and the Locomobile up until the rear-engined Formula 1 days. A length of time that will probably never be equaled. If you're interested in connections here was a man that you could connect from the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup to the Can Am races and who was there to paint them both. Helck himself has estimated that he created more than 600 racing sketches, drawings, and paintings that are owned by both private individuals and museums.

entry 30 May 2006, 16:35

To read more about Rob Roy you can view
the article here.
I've just updated my article on my own favorite automotive artist, Rob Roy.

I'm sure few of you have heard of this French Artist. I hadn't until I came across a book on Le Mans that featured his watercolors. They were like none I had seen before and with the included writing they gave the impression of dispatches from the actual race rather than some sterile work done in a studio. I believe these images exactly relate the feeling that I am trying to communicate through my Grand Prix History website.

entry 27 May 2006, 00:19

Boracchini / Bignami driving the Alfa-Romeo 8C 2300.
To read the rest of the article go here.

The latest addition to the Grand Prix History website is the just completed story of the 1932 Mille Miglia. The hoped for increase in foreign entrants as a result of Caracciola's triumph the previous year did not materialize. In fact the numbers of total entrants continued to decrease and it was left to Alfa Romeo to provide 40% of the cars that did take part. Caracciola himself would be racing an Alfa Romeo this year as Mercedes had quit racing both officially and unofficially.

entry 26 May 2006, 06:08

To read more about the 1931 Mille Miglia you can
view the article here.
I've just finished my short article on the 1931 running of the Mille Miglia.

Soon after we had moved into our hotel, the Albergo Brescia, we had our first conference ...With a map of Italy spread out in front of me I felt like Napoleon before the battle of Waterloo, till I thought of Alfa Romeo's ninety mechanics and seventeen repair trucks and went hot and cold all over.

Alfred Neubauer in Männer, Frauen und Moteren

entry 24 May 2006, 04:29
Cisitalia D46
To read more about the Cisitalia D46 you can view the main article here.
I've upgraded my short article on the Cisitalia by adding wheelbase, track and general information. I've also included a few more images.

World War II had only just ended and most of Europe lay in ruins. Day to day life was marked by a struggle for mere survival but the people were resilient, Even after life on the precipice, a hunger for sport and the spectacle of racing cars could not be extinguished. Commendatore Piero Dusio was a former Italian champion amateur racing driver and businessman. He commissioned Ing. Dante Giacosa, the designer of the Fiat Topolino to create a simple, inexpensive single-seater racing car which could get Italy racing again.

entry 17 May 2006, 15:34

Managing a website can become quite a large undertaking and sometimes you feel like the boy at the dike constantly plugging holes that spring a leak. Unless you maintain it the walls might all come tumbling down. It's easy for parts to go stale, stubs that never get finished or holes that need patching. Code gets placed upon code that before long you need a roadmap to work your way through. With more than 700 pages wanting my attention it's hard sometimes to know what to work on so in order to keep it interesting I don't bother with any master plan. Which to make a long story short I decided that my Mille Miglia section needs an overhaul and that I must add the missing years, bios and a few important cars. So I'm putting in a new menu system ... ugh and hope to have it up and running by the end of the week if not sooner.

entry 16 May 2006, 04:48
Lotus-Climax 25
To read more about the Lotus-Climax 25
you can view the main article here.
I've upgraded my short article on the Lotus-Climax 25.

Colin Chapman was known as an instinctive seat of the pants designer. In fact when the first prototype was being built he took the opportunity of sitting in the car. To his surprise he found that he could fit quite comfortably and announced forthright that: "This cockpit's too wide ... take another inch and a half out out of it!" Dick Scammell, one of the mechanics that built the first car would later remark that: "None of us really knew what we were doing, but it all took shape very nicely and it certainly looked right."

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Hall of Fame
Mario Andretti
Alberto Ascari
Jack Brabham
Rudolf Caracciola
Colin Chapman
Jimmy Clark
Juan-Manuel Fangio
Enzo Ferrari
Emerson Fittipaldi
Graham Hill
Vittorio Jarno
Niki Lauda
Nigel Mansell
Stirling Moss
Alfred Neubauer
Tazio Nuvolari
Ronnie Peterson
Nelson Piquet
Alain Prost
Jochen Rindt
Bernd Rosemeyer
Michael Schumacher
Michael Schumacher
Ayrton Senna
Jackie Stewart
Achille Varzi
Gilles Villeneuve
Jean-Pierre Wimille

Great Racing Cars
Alfa P3
Alfa P3

Auto Union Type C
Auto Union Type C

Auto Union Type D
Auto Union Type D

Brabham Repco BT19
Brabham Repco BT19

BRM P56
BRM P56

Bugatti Type 35
Bugatti Type 35

Cisitalia D46
Cisitalia D46

Cooper T51
Cooper Climax T51

Duesenberg 1921 GP Car
Duesenberg 1921 GP Car

Eagle-Weslake
Eagle-Weslake

Ferrari 500
Ferrari 500

Ferrari 156
Ferrari 156

Ferrari 312B
Ferrari 312B

Ferrari 312T
Ferrari 312T

Lancia D50
Lancia D50

Locomobile Type 1906
Locomobile Type 1906

Lotus-Climax 25
Lotus-Climax 25

Lotus-Ford 49
Lotus-Ford 49

Lotus-Ford 72
Lotus-Ford 72

Lotus-Ford 79
Lotus-Ford 79

March 711
March 711

Maserati 250F
Maserati 250F

McLaren M23
McLaren M23

Mercedes 1908 GP
Mercedes 1908 GP

Mercedes W125
Mercedes W125

Mercedes-Benz 196
Mercedes-Benz 196

Napier 30 HP
Napier 30 HP

Peugeot 1914 GP
Peugeot 1914 GP

Renault RS11
Renault RS11

Tyrrell P34
Tyrrell P34

Vanwall 1957 F1
Vanwall 1957 F1


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