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> SLOT IT PART SICH 56 vs SICH 56B....axle bearings..
Pete-slot
post 7 May 2013, 06:21
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Anyone tried the new sintered bronze bearing ...
if so .. any improvement ?

Only thing I can see about the old one SICH 56 was that in some mounts it was a bit loose (I really mean a tiny bit) .. so needed gluing
Is SICH 56B any better .. its a different material .. is it slightly larger (microns) ....... any lap time improvements ?

Anyone ?


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stoner
post 7 May 2013, 08:17
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I dont know the answer, but there very hard to reduce the contact patch on these sperical bearings, for less friction. I try not to use slot it mounts for this reason and you cant get ball bearings in without a lot of work. john.
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Phil Upton
post 7 May 2013, 10:06
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... biggrin.gif


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Slot.it
post 7 May 2013, 11:11
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I think this is a very significant improvement and I have collected large evidence to support it. This was done before switching production to these bushings, as this is a critical part in the drive train. We are using these bushings as standard now for all production cars.

The shape and tolerances are basically the same, Some changes are due to the different technology used but overall you can replace one for the other as far as the dimensions goes.
The real big difference is the material (bronze vs. brass), and the fact that pores in the sintered bronze surface capture and keep in place little droplets of oil.

I've just done a post race analysis of a Porsche 956 which did 2nd at the 24hours race of the European Gr.C Championship raced this past weekend in Spain, that I was generously been given as a present. To my surprise (and I'm sure to the surprise of the guy who set the car up!), the left bushing was of the new type, and the right bushing was old. So, unwillingly, the team performed a real racing, 24 hours test of 'new vs. old' bushing.
The result is absolutely clear. The car was assembled with a hollow shaft, whose surface is not as hard as the 'solid' shaft. The part of the shaft under the new type bushing (left, near the crown), is almost like new, whereas the right hand side, under the brass bushing, shows significant wear out.

This is a real life picture of my own Porsche after the successfull oXigen 24hrs race of Henley in Arden. It is not a particularly high resolution but the rear shaft is still perfect (and so are the bushings)


Hope this helps.

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rick1776
post 7 May 2013, 12:20
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I thought you always advertised your bearings as being bronze bearings?? So were they really brass (copper/zinc) all this time rather than bronze (copper/tin and maybe phosphor and lead as well)??

cheers
rick1776
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RichD
post 7 May 2013, 12:49
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According to the catalog that I have the regular PA02 sleeve bearings have been bronze while the spherical CH14 bearings were brass. I did get a PA02 bearing analyzed by EDS and they are indeed bronze. There ane many different grades of bronze, vome are used for casting, others may be intended to be machined. I believe that the addition of small amounts of lead makes the bronze easier to machine and phosphorus makes it more wear resistant. Oilite bearings are commonly used in 1/24th scale commercial raceway cars. Those cars are heavier than 1/32nd cars and have more grip, so there is a lot of stress on the bearings and they need to be replaced from time to time.
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stoner
post 7 May 2013, 13:02
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the oil retaing ability makes sense, but why not use an oilite bearing where the axle would float on a cushion of oil. john
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Slot.it
post 8 May 2013, 07:56
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I don't think we've ever advertised the CH14 or CH56 spherical bushings as anything but brass.
All other Slot.it bushings are made of machined bronze, except those for old Carrera cars, PA12, that are made of brass. PA32 is made of specially hardened and Teflon coated aluminium. Please refer to http://www.slot.it/ITALIANO/KitPart/bronze.html
CH56b is made of oil impregnated porous bronze. In other words what we do now are like oilites, but AFAIK Oilite is a registered trademark of Beemer corp, so we can't advertise them as such. I think it's the first application of "oilites" on plastic chassis cars, but I may be mistaken.
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