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Hey everyone.

I am thinking about moving from 1/32 to 1/43, but both have their advantages and disadvantages. One of the main disadvantages to 1/43 is the "scratchbuilding" aspect, which I enjoy. Does anyone know of a slot jig that would be compatible for 1/43 scale? Also what are the best dealers for wheels and rims for 1/43 scale?

Thanks as always
Sean
 

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You enjoy scratchbuilding - why not making your own jig ?

You find Corian or Teflon in appropriate thicknesses at Ebay. The only thing you need is a kind of box column drill ( drill press ) to get the holes needed really rectangular upright.

A lot of pictures of various jigs you´ll find here in the forum in the scratchbuilding section - all for the bigger scales, but I´m sure you can scale down.

Roland
 

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I could not find a good 1/43 building jig either.
Roland has the right idea.
I made my first crooked chassis freehand. Then I put a fence on my drillpress table and drilled some holes in a slab of corian along one side and repeated the hole drilling along one edge to make a right angle. That is good enough to build a chassis. It keeps everything square.

I ended up buying a Backtrack Chassis Jig. Pretty pricey, but you can build a 1/43 on it. Some of the measurements can be a little different for 1/43.
The chassis that won the first leg of ISP43 Proxy was built on it.

What features would you like to see in a 1/43 chassis jig? Anyone?

Ted

PS: R-geo makes a good jig that says it can be used for 1/43 scale also. Old Wierd Harold site has a good thread on it. Do a google search.
 

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Drilling some extra holes in a 1/32 jig will get the shorter wheelbases you will probably want in 1/43

It is perfectly possible to build a good chassis without a jig, just using a flat plate and squared paper. It has to be admitted the time and skill needed is less with a jig.

I am not too keen on Corian as a jig material, it softens at well below normal soldering temperatures
 

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QUOTE (300SLR @ 1 Aug 2012, 20:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>......I am not too keen on Corian as a jig material, it softens at well below normal soldering temperatures

Why then are so many jigs made from this material ?

Btw - I have been using Chas Keeeling´s jig for more than 20 years for my 32nd scale cars. Then he made me one for 24th purposes.
And meanwhile I myself have added holes that make it usable for 43rd scale as well. The most important addition I made was a really exact centerline that I engraved. Since I prefer the old method of working with drawings I put the chassis drawing on the jig and adjust it exactly along the centerline. The rest is as usual.

Roland
 

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Roland
Why are so many jigs made from Corian ?
Good question

Last time this came up on the forum, examples of commercial jig maker using Corian were quoted. The only one who replied said he stopped using Corian way back and switched to a higher temperature material.

QUOTE (300SLR @ 24 May 2012, 07:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'd be interested to hear more about experiences with jigs made with Corian

Corian is made by DuPont, their data sheet says it can be thermoformed into new shapes at 160 degrees C
The ordinary 60/40 solder starts melting at more than 20 degrees C above that, and some builders use higher melting point solder.
Soldering irons have to be some way above the melting point of solder to work properly, tip temperatures of 260 degrees C are typical
I tried putting a hot soldering iron on a Corian off cut, and the Corian melted.
A hot soldering iron makes no differance to an SCD jig even if left there all day.
 

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I,ve never had any trouble soldering on a corian jig, evan using a butane flame on some parts. i,ve got 3 homemade corian jigs a 1/32-1/24 and long drag jig. still as good as new. except for some brown stains from the acid flux for silver soldering. john
 

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I',m not sure whas my SCD jig is made of asit's propbably around 20 years old, but as the other posting says it would be easy to add extra holes for 1/43 cars. They would be all on the same alignment so drilling them would be easy. One thing I have done with mine is to replace the steel posts with longer alluminium tubing, doesn't leach the heat away so much
 
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