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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A build I just recently finished, after years of wanting to do it, and months spent in execution, as I built it concurrently with a Lotus 63 shown over in the "scratchbuild" file. They were quite challenging for me, as I definitely wanted both to be four wheel drive as per their prototypes. Both cars are most definitely "component" builds rather than "totally from scratch", but still, they both required extensive modifications to those parts to all come together and fit into their vac bodies. Speaking of which, this turbine's (1/32) body source is still a mystery to me. I got it so long ago that I forget where and how. I am torn between it being Lancer's or a Betta. It was definitely quite old even when I got it, with the yellowing and quite thick butyrate you see in vintage vacs. Unlike Lancers, this one still had the "web" around the edges, but unlike Bettas, there was no ID script on that web. Other major components:

Buzco 1209 brass frame, extensively modified.

13d Mabuchi motor, modified to allow 4WD

Cox Lotus style wheels with foam tires by "Blayne", Riggen knockoffs. Though 1/24, don't they look just right?

Tradeship 24T nylon gears front and rear.

Rannali guide

Cox driver

And other stuff I can't remember right now; it's getting late, so here we go:

Tire Vehicle Car Wheel Motor vehicle


Wheel Tire Car Automotive tire Vehicle


Electrical wiring Wood Gas Composite material Flooring


Gas Wood Machine Electrical wiring Audio equipment


Motor vehicle Vehicle Automotive exterior Gas Wheel


Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Toy
 

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Nice build Steve, may you post a picture of the chassis seen from above? How did you take the power from the end bell of the 13D?

Cheers

Eduardo
 

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Ditto Steve, would like to see that.

Very nice job, and very curious to see how it runs. I've played around with 4WD, including a period Paxton turbine, but haven't found the secret yet! And wouldn't think a 13D has the beans to propel a 4WD, but be glad to be proved wrong!

Given what you say about the bodies, I'm a bit puzzled as well. Has Betta always written the name on the web? I think you're right, that Lancer always trimmed their bodies.

The wheels do look right, good choice!

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
per request, here are the inners of the 56. Mount to the body is the traditional straight pin method.

Gas Machine Screw Composite material Engineering


Motor vehicle Wood Gas Wheel Machine


Of course the main challenge here was to somehow extend the shaft of the 13d forward so as to gear up the front axle. In my collection I found only one thing that would work: a NOS "hemi" armature (blue wind) that "American Line" re-packaged and probably sold through REH 20 or so years ago (or more?). I dismantled my motor, and the stacks of the hemi armature did spin freely within the can, which was my main concern being the hemi came from 16d size applications. I did know that this was a "hotter" arm, from experience with it in some of my old Strombeckers. Hoping I could deal with that, I plunged ahead: did all the little chores to get the motor back together, then stuck it on my dyno setup (just the motor). It just barely turned over! Apart again, inspect, lube, but same result. Then I remembered that wind (duh) and glanced at my setup: a toy 1 amp/12v transormer with my Cox 25 ohm controller on it, well, no wonder. Rather than switch it all out there, I moved over to my Strombecker test loop track on 2 amps, and hooked up a 10 ohm controller, voila! It sang! If running quite a bit hot! So I felt confident enough to proceed to the next big step. In the junk pile are quite a few old blown and stripped armatures: I found one of the same shaft size (.078, common Mabuchi) and cut off the end that still had a brass pinion on it. The two shafts would have to be joined, as well as supported rigidly toward the front axle. The key piece in the assembly was the fabrication of a "coupler" wherein the two shaft ends could be inserted/soldered together. It got interesting: in my stock was 1/8 OD brass tube, with an ID too large for the shafts, and the next size down 3/32, with an ID too small. Now, the latter can fit snugly inside the former, so leaving enough of the 1/8 to hold on to, I cut an approximate length needed of the 3/32, ran some solder into the ID of the 1/8 stock, then used the tip of the solder gun to run it in while it soldered in place. Next was the hard part: to drill out the product of that operation as close to .078 as possible. Nothing fancy in my tool box, I just got a 5/64 bit into my hand drill, and patiently over several sessions drilled it out to the needed ID. Held the rod in my left hand while turning the drill with my right and the handle planted firmly on my sternum! Last step was to carefully measure the coupler length needed, then cut it off the stock and deburr.

I won't bore us any further at this point, except to mention the small bracket I got off an old Russkit Spyder frame, modified it to accept a motor shaft bearing from a junk endbell while lining up the whole contraption, and once the bracket is secured to the frame, solder everything at once while all in place. I knew this was the "no turning back" point as to dealing further with the motor, so one more run was made on the (updated) dyno just to make sure. Don, as to the 13d's capability with this, once I got a rolling chassis, more time was spent on the dyno running things in. But it has had teething problems; for a while needing a little push to just get things rolling (the 1:1 car was the same!). Also, the chassis and in fact the whole car is very light. Magnesium wheels probably help! Can't tell you what the on track response is yet, as I am still trying to clear up amperage/ohmage issues on the temperamental Strommie track! Be glad to answer any other questions.
 

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