SlotForum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having just seen the excellent Targa Ferrari in a posting on SF reminded me of a link sent to me last week of archive footage from the 1971 running.


It's very noticeable how the cars pitch and roll compared with today. I know that they were set up soft and high for Sicily but they still looked as if they would fly on the straight. It's curious that de Adamich seems to get more air time than Vacarella although the latter was the winner. Vic Elford was again heroic.

For any NSR 908 fans, here is what the originals looked like in action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,349 Posts
Gripping

Nice vid. Many thanks. I suspect that today's stiffly-sprung prototypes wouldn't get very far on Sicilian roads today.

I also think that the Targa spanned such a long period (1906-1973), it deserves a new thread to itself in the 1:32 section. In my view, these great road races shouldn't be forgotten.

Younger folk I've met in the past few years have never heard of Sicily, let alone the Targa Florio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,349 Posts
Wicker B

Many thanks to you. I propose a thread about the Targa having already forgotten that there is one, which I started. Huge memory lapse on my part caused by advancing senility/stupidity.

Your reminder is most kind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Thanks for posting this, Gripping Pneus. Many members of my club run a lot of these liveries. It's very cool to see the real thing.
smile.png
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,904 Posts
Great video, the start confused me, thought maybe it was an advert about donkeys at first. It would be a great promotional video for Sicilian tourism. They should try to run this race again, it would be brilliant if you could run modern GT and historic cars.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I think it has been re-run as a time trial type rally with regularity sections between villages. You have to declare a tin=me that you will do the section in and then keep to that with a penalty point for each second late at a control and two points for each second early. There is usually a secret control point on each stage to prevent everyone going like stink and then sitting outside the control until their time is up!

It is by no means a race like the original though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Matthew77. The race offically got stopped by the police after too many spectator deaths (including children) or it would still be going on today. Race cars were getting more powerful each year.

They apparently hold a rally through the countryside now instead. Much less power and speed makes for a much safer end.

Cars like the Ferrari 512S belong on a closed circuit track where specators can't wander into their path.

They talked about fencing the course. But the cost was out of this world, and totally impossible. A race era came to an end.
wacko.png
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
The race offically got stopped by the police after too many spectator deaths (including children) or it would still be going on today.
I think you are confusing it with the Mille Miglia. That was stopped for the above reason, but the last Targa had no serious injuries. Perhaps because the speeds were much lower, there were few incidents with spectators throughout it's history. There was great concern that there would be a repeat of the '57 Mille Miglia though so it had to go. As you say, the cars were getting more powerful every year.

The interesting thing to me is that by any other definition, the "race" was a rally as they are run today, but with one big stage, so spectacle lives on in rallying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
No one can argue that the Mille Miglia had many more deaths (56 recorded deaths in 30-years). Only 9-recorded deaths in the 71-year history of the Targa Florio.

But Wikipedia also says the following about the Targa Florio.

The Targa was continued as a national event for some years, before a crash in 1977 which killed 2 spectators and seriously injured 5 others (including the driver) sealed its fate. The 1977 race was forcibly taken over by local police and was stopped on the 4th lap, and it also saw 2 other drivers having serious accidents; one of them was critically injured, but survived.

The bottom line. You can't race super-cars through small city villages where spectators can wander onto the race track.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Ken,

I stand corrected! My literature on the race stops in 1973 which I erroneously assumed was the last one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
It's all good Gripping Pneus. We're all on the same team.
thumbsup.gif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
Actually, I stand corrected too. I recently found out that we're all on the same team unless you scratch build a yellow BRM 578 Stackpipe with gold, wire wheels. At which point I pretty much stand alone.
biggrin.png
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm in the opposition there too I'm afraid.

As an aside to the main topic, for three years I had an Italian girl friend who was half Sicilian. Her Grandfather lived in Trapani on the island and she visited there often. She lived in Brescia, home of the Mille Miglia and was lucky enough to have seen both of the events "in the flesh".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
As well as wandering spectators, don't forget the goats and donkeys. Vic Elford was a targameister due to his rally background, poor camber, changes of surface, fine coating of sand were no problem to quickvic,legend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,236 Posts
But Gripping Pneus, I may have the only bright yellow BRM 578 (I know of). It also has its uses. Someone on the subway says "anyone want to see pics of my puppy?" and the entire train tries to get closer. I ask "anyone want to see pics of my yellow BRM 578?" and everyone backs away. Automatic social distancing.
thumbsup.gif
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top