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Andy, the reason why these replacement parts made of clear polyurethane resin are pricey is that they require lots of time and expensive materials to produce. No way around it unless someone decides to loose money on every part... :(
The advantage of these new parts is that they are far stronger than the polystyrene originals and "crazy glue" (as in "cyanoacrylate" ) does not craze them like it does on the original stuff. Best is to glue them with 5-minute epoxy because regular glue will not work.
 

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Once hobby grade 3d scanning equipment becomes less expensive entire kit clear window parts trees can easily be scanned and reproduced using 3D SLA printers using crystal clear UV polystyrene monomer resins that would be nearly indistinguishable from the original parts. Ditto for opaque bodies/parts trees.

The current technology exists for $600 scanners, $600 medium format 3D SLA printers, and UV curable styrene monomer. Within a few years we hobbyists will be able to reproduce any of our favorite hardbody slot car/model bodies as long as we have an decent original stashed away to scan and repop with such equipment that will only get cheaper and more capable.
 

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I took a bit of a gamble on this one, an MRRC double pole-pieced 3-pole with no brush gear. The seller didn't know what he had, so scattergunned a few manufacturers in the listing - perfectly OK when you really don't know what you're selling. MRRC wasn't included, but "Revell" was, which is how I spotted it. I had a spare set of brushes and a spring (robbed from a duff Scalex RX4), and the motor goes well.

But can anyone shed any light on the front end? I didn't pay it much attention, and thought it was a scratch-build, but it isn't. Very nicely crafted, with independently rotating front wheels. The axle is 1/8th" (or very very close) but none of my spare Revell wheels will fit - I think it's the thread type, not the diameter? Atlas, maybe? Ah, yes - I do have one Atlas motor, and the main part of the front end is the same - except it's been modified to take an Airfix steering front end! (It came under a vac formed BRM H16).

P.S. They're not going to stay paired together. The motor will get a real MRRC front end, and I would quite like to match up the front end to something else, if I can find wheels to fit.
 

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HI John

It is an Atlas / Marusan front end with I guess a Riko ( sourced from Japan ) independent front axle so probably a metric thread ? if you can find some MRRC Springs and brushes as they are a lot better than Scalextric ones

john
 

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Those Atlas jobs are good front ends, easy to hang a slab of brass off them too!

John, do you know if the Riko or whatever independent fronts are the same as the Ulrich independent front axles that are pretty common in the States? A seller named imslots still sells them, and I assume they were made in Japan. They're 5-40 threads of course, and I would have thought it was the same here, but if they don't fit the usual wheels...

Good find in any case, always nice to have an extra double-poled MRRC motor!

Don
 

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Hi, and thanks (John, I only just saw Don's post). I do already have quite a few MRRC 3 and 5 pole motors (more 5 poles than threes) so I could cannibalise one of those I suppose. This is my first double poled piece 3-pole, so I think it does deserve the best I can give it. I need to check if the Ken Stokes National champion Merc did have an MRRC steering front end. And after all, it was the motor that caught my attention, not the front end. Incidentally, I was mildly surprised that when I removed the bolts to remove the front that the extra pole pieces are only held in place by the bolts, no solder or other adhesive involved. Was that normal? I do have a doubled 5-pole, but that's got a lot of (non-magnetic) solder.

I don't know what to make of the independent front axle. The bolts that came with it seem to fit the rear axle of my Atlas BRM perfectly - but the wheel that I took off the BRM doesn't want to fit on the new axle. Maybe a damaged thread? Don't know; but it was a bonus so I'm still a happy chap. I suppose it would be quite nice to marry up the new front end, if I can get some wheels, with the older Atlas motor.
 

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Hi John

The Double pole MRRC Motors that I have are all soldered together inner to outer side plates, I have checked the independent front axles I have and as Don suggested all 5 40 threaded so hopefully just a burr on the thread.

john

PS if you need a replacement independent axle PM me
 

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John_m_w: From the two double poled motors I have, one is tin soldered while the other, apparently, is not:

51194576022_c1be3ef11c_z.jpg

51194576082_d2a1353a48_z.jpg

That may depend on the builder I suppose, An interesting feature of your motor is that it has one of the added (shorter) pole pieces inside and the other outside. In principle I would have said that to be impossible, or at least do not leave clearance enough for the armature, but your photo is clear...
 

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How very strange! I hadn't noticed that detail Eduardo, but it does certainly seem to be the case... Not sure how or why the builder did that.

Does a close-up look help explain anything John, perhaps with a normal MRRC by its side?

Don
 

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About one of the extra pole pieces being inside the original - it's just a trick of the angle the pic was taken at; both the extra pole pieces are definitely outside the original frame. The camera never actually lies, but it can certainly mislead which is what has happened here. They weren't "my" photos, btw, just downloads from the ebay listing. I thought they were really good (I didn't post them all) and what I was mostly looking for was the solder connections to the armature. It certainly made me look several times, though, both at the pics and various motors. But it's definitely just an optical illusion.

Thanks for the comments about soldered or not extra pole pieces. I wonder if there was a discussion back in the day? My (modern) two pennorth would be that although I know that lead is non magnetic, I don't know if adding a non-magnetic substance into a small air-gap would actually impede the magnetic flux. I would also mention that heating a ferric magnet is one of the sure-fire way to de-magnetise it. I would close by saying the simple bolted solution is mechanically sound, so leave it at that.

I didn't take any pics of the pole pieces, but I did take a few of the disassembled front end, a couple are included below. That independently rotating axle is a thing of real beauty, the central brass sheath is really really thin, you can barely feel the ridge, and it slides through the 1/8th (5:40) bearing bush comfortably enough. I hope the 2nd pic in particular is clear enough to give an idea of who made it.

I don't think I'll be trying to buy any, I have made a few of my own and although they aren't as pretty as this one, they work, and at least I know the wheels will fit!
 

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And yet, I really looked closely at those four pole pieces before making a papal announcement - thanks for clearing that up!

Your independent axle certainly looks like the Ulrich models I know, also sold by Auto World and others (you can also extend or shrink them by cutting in half and trimming or adding a sleeve). As suggested above, check your threads...

Having seen a few double pole cars going very well, maybe time to start a thread... Soldered or not, I kind of assume they were rezapped one way or another!

Don
 

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Neither lead nor tin can channel magnetic flux so most solder should either make no difference to magnetic flux, or it might even inhibit it.

Andy
 

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The flea market yields another box of treasures. This lot from the midwest US showed up just as you see it, as if the owner came home from a club race, put the case in a closet in 1969 or 70 and never opened it again. I believe this fellow raced with my father in the south suburbs of Chicago and thereabouts. I don't know what his racing skills were, but the car building speaks for itself. The car with no body clearly was shaped for a 1967 STP turbine car. All the bodies were painted on the outside and the wood blocks had been glued inside with contact cement. They will be re-glued along anything else that has become adrift.
 

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Amazing find AJD, good for you!

These are indeed pure Midwest products, but I didn't know there were any clubs in Chicago or even its suburbs that ran these - always heard about Rockford and a few others.

Your guess of 69-70 sounds about right; there's a B can in there and the free wheeling fronts. I remember seeing a photo of those in one of the magazines, but don't remember the dates offhand.

The bodies are beautifully finished and these things should fire up right away and run very well with new rubber.

Don

PS: that 26D sidewinder probably from a little earlier. There's even a good chance it was based on the 2 or 3 part article by Pete Hagenbuch in Car Model, starting in March 1967...
 

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and now, "double wire" hookups!

I believe those are "caster" style fronts, but of course free-wheeling as well. Never understood the advantage.

Is the 26d can carved out to clear the rear axle?

I seem to remember at least Evanston, Il. had a club and would send racers around the area.
 

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I remember those fronts and, in fact have my father's only build of that style chassis. It needs the motor innards put back in and a body sourced (Porsche 908 coupe). I think that feature went out of style eventually. There were at least six clubs in the Chicago area per the 1968-69 six race series I have documentation for. As for the 26D, without taking it apart I don't know. He had a few axles that were turned down between where the bearings ran that would either eliminate or minimize the need to grind the magnet. Pretty clever.

I don't know if it was inspired by the article, but Roy Moody was doing that stuff around that time in these same group of racers.
 
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