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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a few points about buying todays products:-

1) Buy the thing that sells the most - there will be more demand and a much larger market for it in 30-40 years

2) Avoid the thing that sells the least - rarity is not as significant a factor in the toy collector market as people think. If folk did not want it now they more than likely won't want it then.

3) Buy licensed merchandise - this has always been very popular area with collectors and has a wider market than just those interested in the product as a toy.

4) Keep the packaging - this has always had a very high value to the collector.

5) Condition, condition, condition - mint items are the most highly prized and collectable and this trend is likely to continue.

6) Buy limited edition product of volume manufacturers- these command a premium today and this trend is likely to continue.

7) Buy cheap product from volume manufacturers over expensive product from limited production manufacturers- cheap product is used by kids and expensive product used by adults. Kids are more likely to damage product than adults!

8) Buy the big brands - everybody bought them as kids and now want them as adult collectors.

9) Avoid the products of the new kid on the block - companies come and go but the big brand has been around for years and is likely to be around for many more years. Only buy a companies product for collection purposes if that company was around when you were a kid. Dead companies products are not that collectable as they have been forgotten.

10) Buy items that your kids find fun - if your kids are having a great time then that item will evoke fond memories as they grow up and turn into collectors.

Cheers
Moped
 

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I think you've mis-titled this post Mope - it should be "A few tips for wanabe investors"!

I have one tip for collectors starting out:

buy what you enjoy and not what you're told to by someone else!

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Agreed that I might have but everybody at some point sells off all or part of a collection or has a collection sold off for them and many collectors sink a lot of money into developing their collection so it has to be a consideration for many.

Another tip is to buy product that appeals to the widest possible global audience. Why limit your eventual market to the population of one nation.

Cheers
Moped
 

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Mop 'ed

Spherical objects...

In 40 years I'll be well dead and my kids wouldn't have a clue about their old dad's toy cars.

Who cares what might be worth what whenever when, let's just get on with playing with toy cars while we've got the chance.

I didn't exist for an eternity and I'll be non-existent another eternity-in the meantime, I'll play with whatever toys take my fancy and give a bugger not what they might be worth in another lifetime.

So there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lets not confuse the collector with somebody who just wants to play with their slotcars.

Has not this forum been set up for collectors, not racers?

Cheers
Moped
 

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I think you have to accept that there is a big grey area where 'collecting' is concerned.

Some people will only collect slot cars, keep them in boxes to preserve their condition, but have no intention to race them on a track.

Some people will play with the cars that they collect. They are no less of a collector, but care less about the monetary value of the collection.

Some people just buy cars to race.

Most people on here will live in the middle category. Your list is good advice for people in the first category, with some good info for people in the second.

Please don't turn this section into an argument over what the definition of a collector is!
 

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Good point! You are what you want to be, there are no rules about collecting and you do what makes you happy


I do not buy so called "Collectors editions" just because a certain manufacturer says that is what they are and I strongly disagree with that point. The basis for my argument would be the experience of Fly collectors who have bought only to find out that their cars have actually dropped in value. I think that there are better things to invest in than slot cars if you want to make money and to speculate on them is foolish.

I tend to agree with the buy two of each theory as I have done in the past, when there were fewer cars produced it was easier. Not so now so I just stick to Roger Gilhams` advice of collecting what I like/enjoy


To me what makes collecting interesting is if there is some reason behind the desire to obtain a certain car. Certainly knowledge of the real thing or a history such as you had this as a lad (or in a lot of cases could not afford it then). I find nothing more boring than buying cars because they may be more valuable in the future. How long can you hold a conversation based on that particular aspect?

I enjoy some of the best posts made on SF by people who clearly have a passion and knowledge of the sport of motor racing that transfers to slot cars. In addition there is now a rich history of slot racing in it`s own right.
 

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Hi All

Agree with some parts of all your comments regarding collecting, but a couple of points of interest (IMHO as always!).

Mopeds points:

1) buy the most popular items? How does this explain the desire, by some (me included), for non popular items? example James Bond sets, Ternco Metros, Buggati, Auto Union, 1/24th etc. These generally boomed when they were first issued and hence are now very collectable.

2) don't buy things that don't sell? - Rarity is a massive factor in collecting (same point as above)

3, 4, 5) agree

6) Limited editions from high volume? - not really, fact is today's collectors may buy the collectors editions, but the non collector edition (Sports/Crystal) is very likely to have been made in less or equal numbers and or purchased buy users of the car rather than collectors hence they will be in used condition and finding a mint example may prove tricky in the future. The limited editions are normally the first edition of a new model, the next livery is normally more tricky to find. For an example of how this can go very wrong - look at the Die Cast market.

7) agree - example try finding a mint Porsche 959 Rothmans loads and loads sold as set cars but try finding one in mint individual boxed condition, other examples that spring to mind, Ford Sierra Cosworth Monroe C169, Team GQ No.18 C2018, Brabham BT44B Pirelli No5 White 'Drive'. Not expensive, but tricky to find.

8,9, 10) not to sure about these, time will tell, but there is always a market for small one offs of particular makes/cars.

In general i would suggest never collecting as an investment only do it for fun.

The only other observation i can add is the recent lack of quality 70's 80's Scalextric cars to buy. You can go to any swapmeet and probably buy every variation of 60's Scalextric car you could ever want on the day, but finding those illusive 80's third edition liveries is proving tricky.

Each to their own

Gareth

mental note to self; must buy less slot product, must buy less slot product.........
 

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I am a collector but I collect what I want to collect. Buying cars I like and cars that fit into a theme with others I already own. If when I sell them I get a good price then great but this isn't the important factor.

I wouldn't for example buy a car I didn't like and store it in the loft for 40 years just so I could sell it for £20 profit!!!! There are better ways of investing your money.


JS
 

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Mopes tips for serious collectors who are buying Slots for future value are a good starting point.

Here are two practical issues that I never hear mentioned:

1) Catalogue your Collection

Keep a detailed catalogue of what you have bought, what you paid for it, what it's approximate current value is, where you bought it, when you bought, who made it, what are the manufacturers model numbers, what condition is the model in (use normal convetions such as Mint in Box, Mint no Box, etc.), what was the production run (exact or approximate, Limited Edition or General Relesae), what years was this released, what specific variations or unique qualities the model has (i.e. mis-printed tampo etc).

It's amazing how easy it is to track this info in a simple spread sheet and simple to do in real time as you build a collection, in other words do this in the present, it will be much easier than waiting 10 years!

2) Insurance

If your collection has any real value (more the a couple of thousand $ or £) then make sure it is insured! DO NOT ASSUME simple home contents insurance will cover the replacement value of you hard earned and lovingly assembled collection...

Typically contents insurance covers you for losses up and to your policy limit, and often this is just enough to get you back clothed and furnished in the cases of catostrophic loss. Also in the case of loss, if your itmes are claimed as antiques or collectables, it is very difficult to capture their real value, and ofen certain policies exclude fine art, antiquities and collections unless they are SPECIFICALLY listed on the policy.

So keeping a Detailed Catalogue is not only a good thing for tracking your collection, it is crucial in cases where Insurance gets involved.

Talk to you insurance broker or agent if you are a serious collector!

Just some friendly advice from a if I own 'em I drive 'em guy.

Best, Ken R
 

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Collectors and Investors?
Yes, there is a significant difference between them.
But the other vitally important term that is missing is 'Dealers'.
The whole area is a minefield - not much real joy to be had in traversing minefields.
 

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The suggestions to not buy items that don't sell in numbers when new actually is not at all true when you look at the slot cars of 40 years ago, and what's selling now.

Let's look at the Scalextric 1/24 scale cars. Very poor sellers as new, Scalex got out of the 1/24 business after 3 years. The 1/24 scale Lotus in good shape now easily fetches anywhere from $700 US to $1000US.

Many, many of the American Slots that sold in very small numbers in the 60's, from the smaller manufacturers, are among the most sought after slot cars today, sometimes even more than some of the vaunted Cox and Monogram slots.

RE buying ones that sell a lot when new...the Cox Chaparral 2C/A was sold in higher volumes than almost any other American slot car (I think the Classic Manta Ray outsold it)...they're one of the cheaper MIB's (and plentiful) you can find today, and complete used cars rarely go for over $100 even on epay. There simply are too many survivors around today. Are they collectible? Yes. Are they highly prized in terms of $$$$. Not particularly.

If you're looking at collecting for resale value, Mope's comments re condition are obviously right on. But it's all pure speculation as to what particular items will be worth more than another later. Again, it's often the lower sellers that are worth more now. In the case of slots, it's because they sold so poorly the manufacturers pulled them from the shelves. Collectors looking to complete a series from a given manufacturer often pay extreme premiums now for those poor sellers 'back then.'

All that said, I have owned most of the main American slots in my collecting: Monogram, BZ, Classic, Cox, Revell, K & B, MPC, Strombecker, Atlas, AMT, etc. NONE that I owned or have owned I bought for speculation...as someone pointed out 40 years from now I won't be around to 'cash in.' My kids will just sell them off to buy a boat or something anyway.
 

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I think the best part of the collecting hobby is watching the collectors themselves.

Its like a whole other type of entertainment. Its fantastic, kind of like having your own "Scalextric" English comedy channel mixed in with the Oz factor because they have of course trained some Oz collectors out here now. It gets better every week and new characters come in all the time. For some live entertainment, have a go at a Scalextric Auction. Punters come in, sit in little groups at all points of the room and give each other filthy looks all night . What a hoot. Talk to each other, no way
Its all the Auctioneer can do to not fall off the stage.

I jotted one of the more outrageous ones down during one of the more interesting times of collecting here in OZ and bugger me, one of the local newspaper people picked it up to include in a series of short stories.


Nope, the cars are great fun, but watching perfectly rational men behave this way is nothing short of a specticle.

Heres where it gets intersting. My mother has a friend at work whose children had Scalextric when they were children. She's mentioned many times how her friend was going to bring them to work blah.. blah.. My mother came home with it today and I was so busy that when she yelled out from the front yard ( yes, she lives in a house at the front of the property/ no.. I dont live with my mother) I took little notice because it happens quite a bit.

Guess whose the proud owner of two Auto Unions! Sure the bodies are in pristine condition but they cant be worth much,.. the tyres are no good!
 

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Like a lot of people I buy what I like, and can afford at the time (not necessarily the same thing!
).
I wouldn't call myself a collector because I like to play with my toys, but I have built up a 'collection' over the past few years. Hopefully that collection will continue to grow through my lifetime.
If, in twenty years time, when I have two weddings to pay for (two daughters!) some of my 'collection' is valuable enough to help pay for those weddings, and I can bear to part with my toys, then great.
If not, no biggie, I'll just have to cough up and then carry on playing with my toy cars (shame
).

There probably is money to be made speculating on slot cars, but over the next 20 years there will be about 2000 lottery draws and I reckon I've got more chance of winning on that!!

Rob
 

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Hi Guys,
I am coming in late to this but underline totally Ken R. i now have around 3000 cars and although they were logged about 6 years ago that was when I had about 1200, so it is a massive job to catch up now.
Also I have a policy that is specitic to the collection but due to the list being out of date I will only be covered for half the value or less.
Take it from me don't put it off.
FYI I have also only collected what I like and there are many models and variations out there that I have not gone near, my big problem is I never sell any of them!!!
QUOTE (taxi @ 6 Nov 2004, 09:50)Like a lot of people I buy what I like, and can afford at the time (not necessarily the same thing!
).
I wouldn't call myself a collector because I like to play with my toys, but I have built up a 'collection' over the past few years. Hopefully that collection will continue to grow through my lifetime.
If, in twenty years time, when I have two weddings to pay for (two daughters!) some of my 'collection' is valuable enough to help pay for those weddings, and I can bear to part with my toys, then great.
If not, no biggie, I'll just have to cough up and then carry on playing with my toy cars (shame
).

There probably is money to be made speculating on slot cars, but over the next 20 years there will be about 2000 lottery draws and I reckon I've got more chance of winning on that!!

Rob

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