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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to start painting my own cars. I have done some investigating and have decided (well almost decided) to get a small compressor with tank, and airbrush, have seen a reasonably priced kit on the bay. I have been looking around at paints and have come across Auto Air Paint, which sounds like a product that will meet my needs.
My question lies in finish. They say finish with any urethane or polyurethane clear coat. This is where I lose it; I don't know what I am looking for.
Can anyone direct me as to where I can find a compatible product I can use to finish paint jobs using an air brush.

Thanks

Marvin
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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Several members on here use Halfords to source Auto paint in small quantities, as for finishing it is always good practice to use the same brand clear coat to finish the car. Make sure that the airbrush you buy is "setup" for auto paints, it requires a larger needle and tip for the higher viscosity paint.
 

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Phil's advice is very sound: when clear coating, always use the same clear brand as that of the paint used. And if you're painting race cars, keep in mind that, except on some rare occasions, older vintage ones didn't really have that extra glossy wet-look on them - they were well finished (some) but the paint was merely glossy, if at all. I saw many of them race live in the '60s and '70s.


Cheers and good luck: you're gonna luv' it!

Fernao
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies.
The paint I am thinking of using doesn't list a top coat of their own just says any urethane or polyurethane clear coat. The paint is Createx Auto Air Colors.

Thanks
Marvin
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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IMO you could find a better paint system. While this urethane system is very environment friendly it is also a lot of work. Special primer, slow drying time and requires two pack clear coat. It may also require heating to cure during the colder months.
Automotive acrylic touch up cans will dry much quicker, the primer and top coats are easily sanded and the clear coat is out of the can.
Much easier to learn with, you can always go back to the water based system once you have mastered the easier acrylic system.
 

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Is there any reason to rule out model paints? (Tamiya, Testors, etc?) Testors has a new line of Lacquers (cellulose), though it is a North American thing, I think, and I don't know where you are located.

One problem I have with real (for full size) automotive paints is that with the metallic colors, the metal flakes are way too large for 1/32 models and make them look like bass boats
 
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