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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As an N-Digital user I like the Pit Lane Kit. It's not as sophisticated as some of the other brands, however, its simplicity and reliability fits well into my racing requirements. The only real complaint that I have is the lack of separation between the pit lane and the outside lane of the adjoining track. Now, if you have single lane curve track sections or the skill to fabricate custom track pieces that are compatible with the Ninco track system, then you could physically separate the pit lane from the rest of the track. In my case, even if I could do that, it wouldn't matter because I don't have the required space.



So, here is a simple and inexpensive alternative. A pit lane wall made from three simple components:

1. A vinyl door sweep available from Walmart for about $2.50
2. Nylon screen material available at most hardware stores. You need about $0.75 worth.
3. A full page (8 1/2" x 11") adhesive label to print advertisements on an ink jet printer (optional).

The photo below shows the screen material and door sweep. The screen material will be used to simulate chain link style fencing on the top of the pit wall. The door sweep has a clear panel that runs along the top and a shallow clear lip that runs along the bottom. In the middle is a fairly rigid white plastic panel. On the back of the rigid panel is a strip of very sticky adhesive normally used to attach the sweep to the bottom of a door. This adhesive will be used to hold the screen material in place.



Step 1: Cut a strip of screen material to a length just a little longer than the required length of the wall, which will be exactly 31 3/8" (my pit lane has been extended with one full straight section). The height of the strip should be slightly higher than the height of the door sweep.

Step 2: Removing the adhesive backing as you progress, press the screen material into the adhesive so that the top and bottom of the screen strip are just beyond the the top and bottom of the door sweep. Keep the screen material stretched tight as you progress (see photo below).



Step 3: Trim the screen with a utility/hobby knife at the top edge of the door sweep clear strip and at the bottom edge of the adhesive strip. Note that this is the back of the wall which normally will not be in view. If necessary, the screen material on top of the adhesive can be hidden by a strip of white/masking tape (see photo below).



The next photo below shows the result when the door sweep (now pit wall) is flipped over showing the front view.



The last three photos below show the finished wall in place.







The advertisements on the wall were ink jet printed on a full 8 1/2" x 11" adhesive label sheet and scored individually with a hobby knife, allowing them to be peeled and stuck.

As noted above, the bottom of the door sweep has a shallow clear lip. The combination of this flexible clear lip and the rigid thin white door sweep panel fits perfectly (and securely) in the junction between the single lane and regular straight track pieces that comprise the straight section of the pit lane. No glue or track modification is necessary.

I think that, in spite of its low cost and simplicity, the pit wall improves the appearance of the N-Digital Pit Lane significantly. And there are probably many other applications for this type of easy-to-create barrier.

Michael
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Greg. I've used this door sweep for other things. For example, I built a "concrete" overpass with retaining walls out of blue foam board. The foam board is surprisingly strong but it is soft. When LMP cars would de-slot on the overpass they would hit the wall and stick in like a dart!
So I lined the inner side of the walls on the outside curve portions with the door sweep to form a hard covering (it bends easily). It worked great. I really like simple solutions.

_michael
 
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