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Hey guys i was wondering how much and what makes a "good" airbrush kit. Im in the u.s and dound a "testors" kit at a walmart by me for about 50 bux(u.s) it ran off a compressor. any info would be very helpful
happy new year
 

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Julius Wilkko
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935 Posts
Hi!

For me "Good" airbrush is metallic 2-action airbrush with top or side feed cup. Any compressor, small hobbycompressor or bigger with an air tank will be fine for modelpainting.

Don´t buy plastic Aztech/Modelmaster/Revell airbrush. Don´t buy single-action airbrush.

When I started airbrushing I got 2-action Badger 150 and small piston compressor without air-tank. Those got me a long way. Badger 2-action airbrushes are reasonably priced and work quite well. If you have a choice I recommend top- or side-feed cup, bottom feed can sometimes be tricky. Article mentioned above recommends Iwata, and I agree that Iwata is very good but also very expensive. Nowadays I use Iwata CM-SB airbrush for my fine arts. You could try n´browse ebay for Iwata bargain. Iwata HP-C or HP-SB are also excellent.

Cheers!

Julius
 

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I've done decades of MRR modeling, and all manner of painting...from weathering, to full paint jobs, etc...on them with an airbrush.

First, I absolutely agree with lordjw in one respect. Metallic 2-action airbrush with a top feed cup. The cheaper plastic airbrushes WILL fail, sooner rather than later. Yeah, the metal dual action brushes are a bit more expensive (though not THAT bad if you can haunt e-bay for a few days), but worth it. Correctly taken car of, they'll last for YEARS (my Paasche is 8 years old and works flawlessly) where, ime, the plastic testors ones will last months if you're lucky.

Personally, I happen to think Paasche airbrushes are the best in the world, but PLENTY of manufacturers make quality metal brushes. Badger, Model Master and Tamiya all make good ones. The Model Master/Aztec line is especially popular amongst model railroaders.

I must, however, disagree with lordjw on one point. IMO, "any compressor" is not fine for model painting. I strongly believe that compressors are a VERY overlooked component of an airbrush system. Ignoring the quality of compressor is, essentially, like ignoring the stability and quality of the power supply to your race track.

Personally, I happen to think there are two brands of compressors on the market. Badgers, and the ones that don't work well.
Again, a bit pricey at times, but long term worth the investment imo.

HTH!

/gb
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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3,373 Posts
I have used a badger for over 20 years and have only recently replaced the needle and tip! Mine has been used with auto paints only.A bit more expensive but has been a great investment. Single action is easier for the beginner and O/K is you are only painting bodies.Duel action is best if you want to do fine detailing.
 

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there are all kinds and quality of airbrushes. I have to say that for plain old slot car body painting (not fancy fine line work etc) I have been very happy with my 20 year old Badger 250. It is bulletproof...and does a nice, reasonably adjustable pattern. I don't even use a compressor, just a pressurized can from the hobby store. You can spend more, and get more, but for a beginner....I'd have to recommend this $15 beauty . Even if you want more airbrush later, the 150 will always have a place on the shelf.
John

PS it is not that I am unfamiliar with other products....I have used many spray guns and airbrushes. My latest have been a $850 3 stage turbine HVLP and $100 VLS Paashe double action. But the fuzzy round pattern of the 150 and it's simplicity still come in handy.
 
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