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I just made a winning Ebay bid on the AMT Sebring Series McKee ($56). This series of cars has been described as "ugly designs", and they don't seem to have much value. A Lotus 30 sold for about $20, quite a good deal I think for the technical parts alone?

I agree that the straight plastic side pieces make the bodies look a bit clumsy, but I don't know if they are that ugly. Judging from the photos the brass chassis seems pretty good, with what seems to be a low center of gravity. And I know that those 16D motors are hot. The plastic bearings & gear look a bit suspicious.

So, how are the Sebring Series cars on the track? Are the unconventional looks the only reason for their low popularity??
 

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Just ugly!

The chassis is indeed excellent and can be made to work very well, and the motor is also very good.

I think the ugly, undetailed bodies and weird body mount system are the two main reasons why these are not valued higher than they are.. Very strange that an outfit like AMT would do bodies like these, but that's slot racing!

Don
 

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Anyone seen the new Series AMT cars that are about to be released -supposedly this month in the USA ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now that I look at my subtitle for this topic, it makes no sense....thanks for the reply anyway! Another question is, how should a car like this be classified in vintage meetings: as a club racer or "regular" slot car....
 

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As a matter of fact Pertti, your subtitle was fine, and your question is a good one.

The answer is: both!

It's a "regular" commercial slot car inspired by Midwest pan plate designs (I believe according to our friend Prof. Fate/Rocky, it was designed by Dick Dobson from Rockford, Illinois, one of the early top club racers in the US, as a consultant to AMT).

However, it's still a commercial slot car design, and not a club racer in the sense that those are usually scratch built or semi-scratch built (ie, a Dynamic motor mount with brass pan and pin pickup in plexiglas block up front).

For many vintage events, in fact, this distinction doesn't really apply, in our experience. Assuming you're running on non-sponge tires, without moo, and plastic or short wood tracks, the advantage of pure BSCRA type slot cars is decreased, other things being equal.

However, something like these AMTs, if properly prepared, would still have a large advantage over the Scalextric, MRRC or similar models of the same period! (again, if properly prepared! just about all cars can be run pretty well, but not by everybody, especially me!)

Don

PS: having a quick think about this, the distinction is really between cars designed solely for home racing tracks, usually with plastic or very simple metal chassis and mostly RTR (Scalextric, Eldon, the Monogram/Revell set cars), and those designed as home, club or commercial racers, which are generally kits: Revell, Monogram, AMT, Cox, etc. (often later released as RTRs, but with same components).
 

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These AMT chassis were the hot ticket when I first discovered slot racing in the mid '60s. They certainly seemed fast and good handling back then.
My memory says that the body was glued to those ugly (in retrospect) side mounts and the body could be slipped on and off the chassis quickly simply by spreading the sides. Have I got that right?

That McKee body seems well enough detailed for the period ... if you can get past the silver painted windscreen.

Regards,
L.
 

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I think they were still screwed into the chassis Low, but maybe somebody can confirm...

And you're right, the McKee isn't bad, and was probably the best of the bunch! The Lotus 30 was pretty sad, the Ford GT scarcely better and... I forget the 4th model! (Chevette?)

On the positive side they're probably one of the more affordable MIB 60s slot cars!

Don
 

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Here is the McKee before and after. Notice that the sides/chassis were actually from a gold coloured Chevette. The size and shape matches the McKee OK, however. I painted the sides black, then partly covered them with Bare Metal Foil. Maybe someday I'll bother to mix a paint to better match the vacform body. Anyway, I think leaving the lower part of the sides black makes the think look less clumsy.

Removing the paint from inside the windscreen was pretty easy. I cut along the windscreen edges with a sharp knife, the paint then peeled off nicely. The driver body bits are Revell, head reproduction Russkit. Now the thing needs some decals and gloss for the helmet.

 
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