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Jon Grainger
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No doubt you have seen the recent pictures from Ricardo Bifulco (Nino Barlini) in his topic 'A Brazillian Maserati 300s' Here

His post has encouraged me to post pictures of my Maserati 300s (hence the 'English' title). I havnt posted details of this build, as it was finished just a handfull of days before the event, so now might be a good time! It is based on a George Turner kit, and is modelled as Chassis 3066, driven at the 1958 Le Mans 24hours, by Jo Bonnier, and Francisco Godia-Sales .

The car was built to race at the 2011 Colchester PCS Tourist Trophy. The rules stated that the chassis (as you may have guessed from the title) must be the PCS unit. After some work, the chassis fitted into the car nicely, using the original moulded body mounts. The car, against stiff opposition, won the concours at the event, which I was pleased with. It also ran very well too.


The model features full engine detailing,


The paintwork, as you will notice is a rather dull, almost satin finish. When I was building the car, I spoke to a freind who runs a car restoration workshop in my village, that specialises in (amongst other things) Italain classic car restorations. He assured me that Maserati's of the period had a very dull colour, and the colour could be very different between two cars prepared for the same race! So, I sprayed the car in a grey primer, and then instead of spraying enough paint on the car to get a the 'wet' finish, I sprayed just one pass at a time, left the car for a minute, picked it up again, did another pass, and so on. This means that the car really has about 20 'passes' worth of paint on, but gave the desired effect.



I have removed the moulded rivets, and replaced them with miniature rivets, available from Scale Hardware in the States, around the tonneau and windscreen seal. The driver figure had his pose adjusted, and now appears to be smoking a cigarette. Finally, the lamps on the front spotlights are courtesy of Graham Poulton of GP Miniatures, and add a little more detail than those included with the kit.






During concours judging at the PCS Tourist Trophy

Regards
Jon
 

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Premium Member
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Hi Jon, nice build with great detailing. How did you secure the bonnet for racing? I'm looking at adding gullwing doors to a merc but haven't thought of a way of keeping them shut yet.

PS. although I prefer the dull finish on my builds and yours looks great the story of the 1:1 cars of the period being dull just isn't true. Maybe during the race they lost their sheen but more often than not they wouldn't have started that way. Colours I agree, from car to car and race to race you could never pin down an exact colour, quite a lot of the time it would be mixed up there and then.
 

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Hi Jon! Beaultiful build! congratulations
. Very kind of you attach the link for my car either.

I think I'll buy at least 2 more of these Maseratis from George (one of them will be with this open bonnet version). There is a beaultiful yellow one which raced here in Brasil in the hands of Chico Landi which I want to build too.


The problem is that everything we look at George's site we want to buy


Cheers and congratulations again!

Ricardo Bifulco
 

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Great Job Jon, your modelling skills never cease to amaze me!

Just wish there were more teenagers with your passion for the hobby

Hope you dont move to boats or railways for a long time yet mate!

Simon
 

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Uauuuu.... very nice model! Rivets are top class. I agree with the matt-satin finish of the classic cars. It's disgusting those glossy finishes. In order to protect decals, i usually clear coat with gloss barnish and then a smooth water sanding to achieve that matt finish. Like this:



Congratulations.
 

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It depends - some old cars were virtually matt, some just as glossy as today. You've got to get hold of good original photos to be sure. Have a look at these examples -

1955 Le Mans scuteneering - semi-glossy


1961 Ricardo Rodriguez - nice & glossy


1953 Le Mans works healeys - matt


1955 British GP works Ferrari - semi-matt


1956 Le Mans Jag - nice & shiny!
 

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Hi Jon

fabulous! And thanks for the rivet tip?

What did you use to get the brass color in the motor. I am about to start the motor and have been puzzling over that .. and any other tips for the motor would be much appreciate.

all my very best,

Charles
 

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Nice job, Jon, but I don't like the matt finishes. They really don't look right any more than the ghastly two pack bucket of varnish jobs do. Well painted unpolished cellulose is the finish you want for the most part. These cars were all painted with gloss paints. Some, like those Healeys above wouldn't get any polishing, but they were NOT matt. For a start you can see reflections in the rear deck of the bloke standing by it. It's just not highly lacquered or polished.
Maseratis were most definitely shiny.
My son worked for a Maser restorer for years and he would never have reamed of using such dull paint and he had copious references from Maser themselves and period pictures.

Martin
 

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Regardless of 1:1 scale accuracy I find that any 1:32 car model from before the mid 60s tends to immediately look more "scale" with a top coat of matt varnish. Not an actual super-flat-all-light-in-vicinity-is-sucked-in-like-a-black-hole-varnish but the more usual modelling matt varnishes that have a hint of satin to them. I have no idea why this works and I'm fully aware of how "wrong" it should be.

It's perhaps why I can't stand the chromed parts on model kits or bare metal foil - bright silver washed with black always looks better.

Jon's car is a great example of a slotcar that looks more realistic for it's unrealistic finish.
 

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Gerald Lambourn
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In the model railway world the rule is that the smaller the scale the more appropriate it is to use satin finish paint, not high gloss. In our usual scales a satin finish with varnish is just right. Paint chemistry of the 50's and 60's was fairly rudimentary, and we are often talking about painting hand beaten aluminium, that's why this example is so good. Gerald
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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Gorgeous! I love the paintwork. Art!

I like the driver chatting on his mobile 'phone. Or did the wind just blow away his ice cream?

What was wrong with the existing rivets that made you go to so much effort?
 

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Screwneck, I was wondering the same thing. Rivets tend to get blended in with the paint after a couple of coats.

Matt paint paint was actually a rarity in those days. It was only the advent of modern emulsion paints that led to such a common use of matt. Otherwise it was a case of stir in French Chalk.

Martin
 
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