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Frank
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612 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the second one i want to scratch myself.

The work on my 212 Ferrari Export Fontana Barchetta needs so much bodywork. Ups why do i try to scratch a car like this.


So i decided to start this one, in the meantime.

The body is nearly finished and i´m waiting for the chassis and the wheels. Think this one will be faster completed than my Ferrari


The driver figure is nearly completed, but needs some modifications (pics follow)

but here are the first pics of the bodywork.

Hope you enjoy it.

I´ll try to use a lot of the kit parts (shockabsorbers etc) I only want to cut them of, where the chassis and the whells have to be placed.


the grill is opened

 

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Allan Wakefield
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5,857 Posts
Superb!
What did you use for the metal grill??
 

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Frank
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612 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you boys,

the grill vis made of a fat spraying protection what is normal used for a pan. I´ve bought it for 1,99€ at an 1 Euro shop. Normally you have to spend 9-10€.

So have a look in shops like that and you can find a lot of detailing pieces for less money.
 

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Peter Farrell
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2,114 Posts
I have done thesame with my Ulster. Difference being I bought a tea strainer from a charity shop for 25p, slightly finer mesh.
Alfetta
 

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Premium Member
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2,116 Posts
Wow, nice job Frank, but then, we would expect that from you.

I have been looking at my part-built Ulster for a year now and wondering what was wrong with it. Now I know! Out will come the existing grill and I shall replace it with mesh. Can I share this thread with you and show my progress? I've got a completely different approach.

I guess this will be one of your entries for next year's MMM?
 

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Slot King
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2,633 Posts
Hi Frank, nice car.

You did say we could post pictures.

So, here is one I built years ago for Geoff Spencer. Can't remember where the mesh came from though.


It represents the car driven by Nick Mason (or his daughter) in vintage events.

Joel
 

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Frank
Joined
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612 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@ Graham
Yes, everybody is welcome to post his photos in here and is allowed to share this thread. So everyone can see the different interpretations.

And give me some more inspire.


That will be one of the concourse cars for next year, yes
Can´t be that it will be called " Concourse d´ Allan" once more
and i´m the only one who don´t have any car built myself.
By the way, do you get the cd?

@Joel
fantastic, how do you make the starting number on the grill, is it painted? And do you took a piece of the original axle?
 

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Peter Seager-Thomas
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1,216 Posts
Hi Frank, it's always good to see another modeller making pre-war cars. I look forward to see further progress.

And here's yet another Aston.

The very fine (plastic) mesh is very difficult to work, so I will lay a piece over some styrene sheet, making sure the lines are straight, then apply a spot of satin black to actually stick the mesh to the sheet. The material was sourced at a 'craft shop' where my wife buys some of the materials for her greetings cards. 25mm wide and one metre long, it cost about a pound.



(A look at most Ulsters will show not the external stoneguard featured on the Matchbox model, but a simple integral stoneguard, which, like the radiator, tended to be painted, usually bodycolour.

The same mesh was used for the windscreen frame screen 'gauze'. No backing here, but I did have the brass frame to stick the mesh to.



The model is an almost accurate depiction of LM14 at Le Mans in 1935.

Peter
 

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Slot King
Joined
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2,633 Posts
Frank

The number is a transfer over a metal mesh. It was first softened by either Micro Sol or alcohol, the holes were made with a sharp needle, then the decal was softened again.
Front axle is piano wire with a brass tube running across (I think that's how I did it)

Joel
 

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Premium Member
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2,116 Posts
QUOTE (PeterSussex @ 29 May 2010, 09:57) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The model is an almost accurate depiction of LM14 at Le Mans in 1935.

Peter

Accurate enough for me!


Maybe the bonnet strap buckles are a little too rounded....maybe?
 

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Al Schwartz
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3,390 Posts
An alternate approach to the front axle:



0.0625" square steel bent to match the kit part with 1/16" piano wire stub axles soldered to the ends

This is an example of an "in process" part from another build:



The axle is bent up, a solid piece of piano wire is soldered across and then the inner section cut out and the stubs cut to length (patiently, I might add - it is easy to heat the part enough with an abrasive wheel in a Dremel to melt solder!)

Done this way, the axles slots nicely into the molded spring detail of the kit frame.

EM
 

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Registered
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973 Posts
Useful sources of cheap mesh are: tea strainers, either metal or nylon or Boots used to sell large amounts of mesh for wine straining, so d-i-y wine shops (which still exist) should be able to supply this cheaply. I really like your front axle treatment but I always find it difficult to bend piano wire symmetrically and in the right place. Is there a technique to this?
 

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Peter Seager-Thomas
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1,216 Posts
I might add - it is easy to heat the part enough with an abrasive wheel in a Dremel to melt solder!)

EM
[/quote]

EM, have you tried silver soldering? With the mass of the materials we work with, those little butane blow torches produce more than enough heat, your Dremel will never melt it and it is way stronger than soft solder.

I did my Bugatti headlamp/mudguard stays like this in stainless steel and it worked a treat.

Peter
 

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Al Schwartz
Joined
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3,390 Posts
QUOTE (aerodynamic @ 29 May 2010, 10:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Useful sources of cheap mesh are: tea strainers, either metal or nylon or Boots used to sell large amounts of mesh for wine straining, so d-i-y wine shops (which still exist) should be able to supply this cheaply. I really like your front axle treatment but I always find it difficult to bend piano wire symmetrically and in the right place. Is there a technique to this?

The axle body is bent up from 0.625" square steel - untempered and easy to bend

QUOTE (PeterSussex @ 29 May 2010, 10:43) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I might add - it is easy to heat the part enough with an abrasive wheel in a Dremel to melt solder!)

EM

EM, have you tried silver soldering? With the mass of the materials we work with, those little butane blow torches produce more than enough heat, your Dremel will never melt it and it is way stronger than soft solder.

I did my Bugatti headlamp/mudguard stays like this in stainless steel and it worked a treat.

Peter

In point of fact - both the axle/stub axle joint and the axle/chassis joints are silver soldered - I use either a small butane torch or a resistance soldering probe. I prefer the latter as the heating is so localized that it was simple to do the axle/chassis joints without losing the stub even though they are less than 1/4" apart. It is possible, as I learned to my chagrin, to generate enough heat with a too aggressive application of a cutting wheel, to heat the joint beyond the melting point (~1200F) of the silver solder that I use!

EM
 

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Registered
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1,180 Posts
these Ulsters are fantastic . Great jobs !

here is my Aston , made a few years ago with (Matchbox), and an International based on the pyro 's kit .
Both are very pleasant on the track .



 

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Premium Member
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2,116 Posts
Wow, Bigblock, with carskill like that you should be entering the MMM! Do you still have them? Have you done any others? Could you share your weathering/ageing techniques?
 

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Registered
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1,180 Posts
Hi Graham and thanks ... Yes I still have the two Aston ...
Was " out of slot" these last monthes and did not build any car .
Coming back slowly to my favourite hobby , some pre war cars in project .....
 
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