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I was wondering what method people had devised for attaching resin or other bodies to their choice of chassis?
I realise some bodies do come with a mounting post cast in position but recently I have been working on some
bodes with no mounting posts cast in.I was thinking of using a tube and screw arrangement but there are no
doubt subtle variations on this.
A while ago a good friend of mine TimR posted this method on here and it is an excellent solution:

http://www.slotforum.com/forums/index.php?...c=37121&hl=

I am interested though to see any alternative methods.

Cheers
Eric
 

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Dave Capelen
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2,768 Posts
Hi Eric

A plastic tube with brass end to take the screw works fine. I superglue my tube into a small hole in a small chunk of balsa, itself already shaped to sit flush against the underside of the body and previously superglued to the body. This has worked fine.

I can also supply single and double resin mounting posts, which can again be superglued or araldited to the underside of the body to accept a screw or screws. PM me if you want details of the latter.

Cheers
Dave
 

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Ey Up,

I have covered this topic before.

Take a length of alli tube available from the model shop, strip a length of insulation from 3 core mains cable, which fits inside the tube, mount to the chassis using one's preferred mounting screw, "oo er missus", screw a long 2mm set screw into the other end of each mounting tube.

Apply to body, and adjust the set screws untill sitting as required.

Mix some rapid araldite, or similar brand, and apply to mounting points in bodyshell and end of chassis mounts.

Invert the assembly, making sure that all is OK, and await the result.

Voila, vbe Chris A.
 

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I use a simplified version of what CJA does. I also like my chassis' to be able to rock a bit so usually only mount them with one tube in the front, near the guide, and one at the back, behind the pod.

Randy
 

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I use a small block of basswood (bought in various sizes at hardware/hobby stores), coat with super glue to seal it. I then attach it to the body with adhesive silicone calk-again available in hardware stores. Place a hole(s) in the chassis and simply attach the chassis using the common chassis mounting screws from RTR cars. One can also attach the sized block to the chassis and then use the calk to hold both in the desired position. Works for me.
 

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If you have a late you can drill a bras bar, aluminium or what ever soft metal, even Teflon, out and tap wire into it, for any screw size you prefer and just how long you want it to be. Providing of course you have the tap size of the preferred screw.

Cheers,
Danny
 

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Another method I've used - tubing screwed to the chassis, cut down to be slightly shorter than required. Then mix up a ball of two-part epoxy putty (Milliput or anything sold in the hardware shop for emergency plumbing repairs) and push the ball into the bodyshell where the tubing lines up. (One per mounting post). Offer up the bodyshell ensuring that the tubing gets pushed into the putty. Manipulate until happy with the final placing, temporarily space out between tyre and wheelarch if required.

Leave until solid, carefully remove the screws (helpful to not overtighten in the first place so that backing them out doesn't break the seal between putty and bodyshell) and disassemble, reinforce the putty where it meets the bodyshell and where it holds the tubing with Araldite or similar two part epoxy glue.

I find this quite easy because you don't need to be amazingly precise with your trimming of the bodypost tubing (just add more two part putty) whereas if you are Aralditing the bodypost straight to the bodyshell you do need to be.

Coop
 

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Further to that (because I forgot a paragraph in my rush to leave the office), diagonally scoring the inside of the bodyshell helps the adhesion of the putty and the method is really helpful when it comes to trying to mount a bodyshell that doesn't have a nice flat surface where you want to put a post - such as on the sloping rear deck of a Porsche 911 or similar - the putty can then effectively make a flat surface for your post to sit in.
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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There's absolutely no need to overcomplicate such a simple job with mixtures of metal and other materials.

You just need two diameters of styrene tubing glued with epoxy resin inside each other. This reinforces the screw thread. Cut to approximate length but a few mm longer (file down after glue has set) if you need to. Screw to chassis and epoxy to resin bodyshell after scoring your screwpost base and bodyshell anchor point with a sharp knife. Leave for a couple of hours. Remove screws, add a bit more epoxy if needed, and file down post.

Otherwise glue balsawood sidebars to the inside of your bodyshell and screw to these.
 

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Alexis Gaitanis
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Sorry i didnt post earlier but majhost site that hosts my photos was down
This is how i make body post regardless of material.
Evergreen produces plastic(polystyrene) tubes in various sizes that you can find in many model shops, among them 4,71 and 3,18 mm ext diameter(marked in inches 1/8 and 3/16 respectively),3/16 goes into 1/8 just right .
I cut for each body post a piece from each size shorter than the requiered total length.I screw the 3/16 pieces tight on the chassis paying attention to keep them vertical to the chassis.Then i put the 1/8 pieces over the 3/16 ones,i glue nothing at this stage.


Then i rest the chassis on the reversed body paying attention that the 1/8 pieces touch the body and the 3/16 not,if they do i shorten the 3/16 pieces.A good method to center the chassis into the body is to use tires bigger and larger than needed so that they touch the edges of the fenders,they will keep the wheels centered in the wells.
Then i secure the chassis on the body with masking tape.


Then,using a tooth pick i lay some epoxy glue(i use Bisons epoxy metall,it is slow setting but has never let me down)
just enough to glue the 1/8 pieces on the body.


When the epoxy has set i remove the chassis and secure the posts with more epoxy.


When the additional epoxy has set i reposition the chassis under the body with the correct tires this time,at the correct distance, and after having filled the 1/8 pieces with modelling cement.After the cement has set ready to race.
This is my GT entry at the SCI Can Am proxy.
 
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