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WRP World Champ 2015/2016
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, the idea behind this thread:

I'm relatively new back to modelling and to be perfectly honest, don't have an artistic bone in my body.
I've been overwhelmed by some of the models and the work of modelmakers on this forum and wanted to have a stab myself.

Due to aforementioned lack of talent, I thought my first attempt at a build would be better trying to copy one of the simpler builds of one of the experts. I wanted to help others like myself see that it is worth having a go.
The experimenting is a bit of fun and hopefully I'm picking up some new skills and reawakening my old skill set.

Try not to laugh at my efforts!

I'll put a link to the post that inspired this building at the end, cos if I put it here, you'll just go straight to Don's thread and get wrapped up in it.

So I copied the dimensions Don kindly sent me and cut them out of some posterboard we had lying around in work. I just used masking tape to hold the sides together, and following on from threads, saw the roof may be better made from weetabix boxes and masking taped into position to give it a tired shape.





Then I got some DAS, rolled it out - nowhere near enough, got some more and rolled out a more realistic size (200 grams in this case) and plonked it on the side that looked easiest to start on (the rear - nice oblong shape, only one little window). Notice the bit of card I used as a rough guide to size and shape! Talk about confidence






Realised at this point I hadn't put any diluted PVA on the posterboard, so had to get creative with a big old paintbrush and slop some on! I left this bit for ages to dry, later found out about 20 minutes is ample, before moving onto the next application of DAS.

Next, I laid into it with the non-business end of a teaspoon to mark the grouting/blockwork. I tried not to be too regular, and just tried a few different methods as I went. On completion of the spoonwork, I decided there were too many bits of clay flicked up off the surface, so waited a few minutes and got the trusty old brush out, got it quite wet , then smoothed in the edges so it didn't look like it had been pointed in the last few days!





The best bit came next, putting wall 2 in place, then matching up the blockwork on the corners.

A bit of trimming of the new DAS as it laid across the existing blocks (I had laid these around the corner a little, to give a better effect). Simply a a case of getting your fingers wet and prodding, kneading and cajoling the DAS into shape. I'd forgotten just how versatile this stuff is. As long as you don't bake it, it's pretty lively for a few hours after application, as long as you give it enough water to get it "slipping"



And here she is, with all the DAS on board.





Next, I've got the tiles cut and ready to stick on, but I can't decide whether to colour the walls first. I may get a pop at it tomorrow evening, but tonight is daughter's 18th, Thursday is club night, and I'm off to IoM for SRGB this weekend!

Don's original here Much better all around, but after all, it is my first stab!
 

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WRP World Champ 2015/2016
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys! I need to practice the blockwork Happy - I went a little bigger on this model as it's my first go, my hand needs a bit of practice to be as well defined as Don's work on the original. I think I can get away with this size block, which I reckon is about 18 to 20 inches scale, as it's an agricultural building.

I'm looking at every stone building I pass now to work out the shading and colouring I'm going to use! Will try and get the roof going tomorrow.
Have painted it slate grey before I cut them out, so the edges will need blending in as they look like the cut white card that they are! Will take lots of photos as I go.
Hope not to get as much paint wash on the camera as I did with the DAS - though DAS came off very easily.

Do you know? I'd forgotten the gorgeous smell of that stuff. :0)
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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Good job Snurf.
Glad you finally decided to get your hands dirty.

QUOTE (snurfen @ 17 Apr 2012, 23:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I wanted to help others like myself see that it is worth having a go.

Of course it's worth having a go. Like anything else, until you give it a try you just don't know what you can do.

QUOTE (snurfen)Do you know? I'd forgotten the gorgeous smell of that stuff. :0)

Ahh yes. Mmmmmm. I too had forgotten the smell. Hadn't used it since childhood. Not quite like good clean smell of ordinary clay.

Embs
 

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QUOTE (snurfen @ 17 Apr 2012, 21:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks guys! I need to practice the blockwork Happy - I went a little bigger on this model as it's my first go, my hand needs a bit of practice to be as well defined as Don's work on the original. I think I can get away with this size block, which I reckon is about 18 to 20 inches scale, as it's an agricultural building.

I'm looking at every stone building I pass now to work out the shading and colouring I'm going to use! Will try and get the roof going tomorrow.
Have painted it slate grey before I cut them out, so the edges will need blending in as they look like the cut white card that they are! Will take lots of photos as I go.

Wish I'd thought of the paintbrush trick to get rid of the "flicks" of DAS. I seem to remember painstakingly smoothing off each brick with the spoon - took ages!

Not sure where you are with the tiles. If you've not cut them out yet, the trick is to cut a strip a tile''s length wide then paint the edges. When you lay the tiles, it's only really the bottom edge that shows so I didn't bother painting each edge of each tile. When they're in place, you can always go round and touch up any bits where there's still white showing.

My wife was getting concerned about my apparent barn fetish. For her 40th birthday, we rented a farmhouse with some friends on the North Yorks moors. When we got home, half the photos I'd taken were of old farm buildings
. One thing you realise is that there is no standard size of stone, or style of building, which is great for us - we can do what we want and still claim it's wholly authentic
.

Keep up the good work. It's so satisfying when you start to get the colour on.

Don

P.S. Have fun in IoM!
 

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Circuit Owner
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Nice barn Snurfen!

A thought for future roofing projects. You could try 0.5mm black plasticard (styrene sheet). 15 sheets of A4 size costs about £9 on ebay. It's very dark grey rather than deep black and would work well as roofing tiles. Easy to cut, easy to stick on and no fiddling around painting edges.

Once on - a grey wash to weather it in and it's done.

If you wanted a less precise rustic tile effect you could even round the corners with wet 'n' dry.
 

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WRP World Champ 2015/2016
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Good ideas there - what I've done so far is paint the inside of a weetabix box with slate-ish grey watercolour, then cut a whole row of cardboard, two tiles deep. So I've got from left eve to right eve, two deep. Then cut one row of tiles in by making vertical cuts from the mid point downwards. They've flicked up nicely and will just need a quick run of wash to blend the edges a bit.

I like the idea of plasticard, may well be a good way of inserting the odd "dropped"tile, and making a stack of tiles propped up against a wall (as you see a lot around old buildings).

Don, it's funny how our little ways can be misconstrued by others sometimes - as long as you haven't called your youngest "Barney", I think you may just get away with it.
 

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I love that, I've got a whole box full of packs of DAS I never got round to using, now I know what to do with it all
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Plenty of inspiration about, check Cab77's "three year itch" thread as well as doncatwalkers "under the bed" thread.

Tonight's efforts:

The tiles cut in strips as I mangled the description of earlier!



and here's the first few rows going on each side - slopping plenty of Wilco's finest PVA glue around as I go.



t'other side



So here's all the tiles added, including the ridge tiles



and here's a low shot showing the rickety, slightly collapsing, aspect of the roof.



So the tiles have gone on, but have not really settled yet. When the glue has dried, I'll go back and re-glue here and there, especially at the eves and the ridge tiles, as they aren't sitting properly yet.

I don't think I'll go more than a very very thin wash for the tile edges, as in the flesh, the little cut of the off white card doesn't look too bad. It's the weathering of the tiles that is going to be a bit of a challenge for me. I'll do that after I've painted the walls, I think, as that will add to overall weathering if it runs off the roof and onto the finished walls.

Off to bed to dream of glory in the IoM. Nos da, cariadon!
 

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Why didn't I think of that???? I glued every bl**dy tile on one by one - it took me hours!!! I think I'm going to ask YOUR advice next time


Beware of a problem I had. Once the PVA dries, the Weetabix card can distort. It left me with a gap between roof and wall. I had to resort to some no more nails and a heavy weight to stick it back down. Came out alright though and had no problems since.

ATB

Don
 
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