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Targa Freak
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Hi freaks!

Step 15: Some more scenery and coloring the road.

Next step is to color the road. I have chosen a relatively light matt grey. The lighter the grey is the better you can add darker nouances later. Black or dark cars can be seen better, too. Further more you will get some weathering by the rubbermarks of the tyres while driving the cars arround. I added some darker grey here and there to get some old and worn look. Some little olive matt and light brown here and there and the road looks good. Some cobblestone to be added here and there maybe later. Color is applied with a brush first and partly washed off with a dry kittchen paper. White lines were done with white paintmarker and a lexan-stripe.


The reverseloop is thought to be made look like sand, stones and earth. Additionally the surface should be kept smooth. A little bit brown here and there was added to the lightbrown base. Then I added some dark brown, dark grey and white spots. They were applied with a toothbrush and give some nice look that nearly cant be devided from the surrounding optically.

The fence in the foreground is just some new-years-rocket and thin copperwire. The 'trees' are just a test-version to get some idea where to put them later.

Costs for today: 6Euro for the light grey acrylic color mixed at the colorshop. Sum: 40,85Euro so far.

@rallyP: Heki does 3 kind of colors for 6mm static grass, this one is called "Savanna".

Hope you enjoy. Regards Jens
 

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Premium Member
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Hi Jens,

I like the sandy marks on the road surface at the reverse loop.
Thanks for your clearly explanation.

rallyhub
 

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Targa Freak
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Hi fellows, thanks for your interest and your comments.

@Zook: Yes, I thought about that, too. Lets see.

Step 16: Cobblestones

Some cobblestones as scenery detail for the roadside today:
First step is to mark the area where you want to have the cobble.


Second step is to work out the the gaps. I am sure there are several ways to do, but I did the cobble with an engraver. Several others here did it with a Dremel. A cutterknife or something like that will do the job, too. Best look is when cobble is arranged rightangular to the sideline in my opinion.


The gaps are brushed with a darkbrown and the lighter brown (used as underground for the rest of the track). Overflow is soaked with a kittchentowel before drying.


Then every single cobblestone is colored with some grey; I used two different types: a lighter one and a darker. When first coat of paint dryed the light stones get some dark-grey drybrush for more 3D, the dark ones are drybrushed with the lighter grey.


For now it looks like a freshly layed down tile-floor and some weathering is needed. I just brushed and dabed some little light brown here and there.
Here is the result and a picture of the materials used.



The very light areas are just because of some undryed colors. They look better later. Watch next picture for result after they were dryed.



Engraving or cutting out cobblestone is a bloody damned job but I guess it is the only way to do it most realistic. I tryed some potatostamps earlier, too. They might be used for areas of cobble more then 1m away from the viewer. Here is an old photo of this:

Next time stamping I would do darker Base (later gaps) and lighter stones. I guess that would look better. We had a nice discussion about the cobblestones in that time. You might watch the 'Targa Strada Del Vino'-thread starting arround post #50 for that.

Hope you enjoy. Regards Jens
 

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Mr. Olufsen
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Nice job, Jens, and a mighty fine tutorial.

Christian
 

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That is excellent and timely too as I will be building some into the hillclimb.
 

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Hi Jens

I tried carving cobbles with a Dremel but with fairly "average" results. In the end, I rolled out a thin (3-4 mm) sheet of DAS clay, which I stuck down with PVA glue, and then created the cobbles by pressing a ruler into the clay to create the lines, and then used a spoon handle to define the individual cobbles.

Initial attempt at engraving cobbles




New version made from modelling clay.


With a bit more colour applied


The end result also added a more different road surface.

I suspect that when I tried Dremelling the cobbles, I didn't carve deep enough. Had I done so, I might have been happier with them


Continuing to enjoy this thread.

Don
 

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Jens,
You never stop surprising me! Have followed some great builds of yours, but that you where such a good teacher was new to me. I can only praise you for this simple but excellent ABC, that clearly will take all fears away for a novice builder (and semi experienced ones) and their first build. Great job Jens, looking forward to see more.
Per
 

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Targa Freak
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936 Posts
Hello everybody,

Step 17: A simple stonewall

This is the area that is thought to become a stonewall.


First of all I scewed a piece of ply (found some of about 1,2mm thickness in my woodbox) to get some stiff base.


Second some sheets of polystyrene (6mm thick each) glued on from both sides. Note that I didnt take care for their height untill now.


Using a piece of wood as a guide I marked the later height of the wall as my next step.


Cutting along this line with a knife gives the later height of the wall.
Started to carve some bricks. I simply used a pencil for that. A nail, little screwdriver or whatever you may find in your toolbox might do the job, too.

(Sorry bad quality picture) Note scale: These bricks look too big for 1/32. Deviding them into smaller stones (next picture) looks better.

Finished. All bricks from both sides of the wall carved out. Break out a stone here and there or press the styrene with the fingers here and there to get some old and rough character. Shaping the scenery with a bit plaster can be one of the next steps.


Next is a simple base with a light brown. When using the brown you took for your scenery before the connection between color of scenery and color of wall simply is done. I didnt take care for the gaps this time because the grey of the polystytrne will do a good job in imitating some concretefilled gaps. Otherwise you might treat the gaps with a dark brown before applying the lightbrown (see the cobblestones in step 16 for example).


Like the cobbles the stones of the stonewall are colored one after the other with some different types of grey, sandy color, brown...
Only use little color to avoid filling the gaps and loosing structure that way.


Last but not least everything gets a (very) dry brusch of white to get some highlights.
Here we go:





To avoid damage caused by cars crashing into the wall you simply might glue a little strip of wood onto the wall from the streets side. Colored white with some weathering it will look nice.

Hope you like it. Regards Jens
 

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Premium Member
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Excellent Jens. I have to say you are a master painter. The stone wall looks great. I did mine with a mold and hydrocal but that is messy.
 

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Targa Freak
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Hi freaks, thanks for your kind words.

dont want to nerve you. But just added two little sections of wall and had fun to take photos...



Regards Jens
 

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Hi Jens ,
Fantastic work what exactly is the foam you are using?
I don't think it is the white polystyrene we get in packaging here
Fairly brittle, breaks up to make a lot of mess and as used for beans in bean bags
It looks like something softer and a bit more flexible but obviously will be deformed by the pencil
Cheers
Mike
 

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Targa Freak
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Hi Mike,

thanks for your reply. The stuff used is called 'Climapor' and is an energy-saving insulation tile (100x50x0,7cm) made from polystyrene (XPS), primed white from one side. Producer is www.saarpor.eu. Maybe the link helps.

Regards Jens
 

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Hi Jens

That wall's quite stunning.

I wanted to ask about the foam you used, but was beaten to it
. However, I have another question. Were you able to paint directly onto the foam or did you put some joint compound or plaster over it first? If you can paint straight on and get that effect, I'll be buying some !!

Keep up the excellent work

Don
 

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Ian
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Jens,
You make it all look too simple, I'm sure there is some code that you must be breaking, aren't magicians supposed to keep their tricks secret


 
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