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DT
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Perhaps I'm preaching to the converted, but I developed a method of cleaning braids that doesn't mess up a car with a front in-line motor.

Dirty braids are a real pain, preventing good electrical contact thus slowing the car down.


You don't have to replace braids. If they are kept relatively clean and looked after, they sould last years. The trouble with cleaning cars with front in-line motos is that the cleaning product gets in the motor and mucks things up. So I took a piece of plactic, cut a groove in the front to slip under the guide flag and now it protects the whole of the underside of the car.


You see all the muck that comes off using WD-40 brushed on with a toothbrush. Some use lighter fluid, but WD-40 works fine. It also helps the electrical contuctivity when back on the track.


This is how I hold it whilst brushing:


This is the result. Comes out fine. If there are a few drops of cleaner on the car, just rub off with a cloth.
 

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i must admit I prefer lighter fluid or isopropynol to clean braids, as whilst the residue wd40 grease aids cconductivity, it also picks up dirt and dust quicker.

But the plasitc card thing is still a great idea
 

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I have to agree with Monaro!! But this applies to non new braids. Even when cleaned, some soft braids will have slag inclusions on the track face side from the arcing process. Although the car appears to be running ok it will be slightly down on top end. Shortening the braids seems to increase the contact pressure and usually adds a tenth to straight line speed. The only problem is that shorter braids can be more of a problem in corners with uneven rails so there's a bit of a trade off.

I have observed this phenomenon on plastic tracks only. Copper tape tracks seem to polish copper braids and prevent the problem from occuring in the first place.
 
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