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715 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen (and ladies...lurking, of course)

This may be a dumb question, but have you noticed that your braking is not as crisp at the far end of a VERY long track? It us up to you what you consider a LONG track.

I know you would see the effect on a shorter track, but is there much braking degradation at the far point of such large tracks like the Kings and such? Or even on those long gym-sized race tracks we see them run in Europe?


I appreciate the feedback!

Thanks

-Maltese
 

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Allan Wakefield
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5,857 Posts
Not if you ensure even power distribution around the entire track, the degradation you are seeing is either power drop (easy to fix) or simply perspective changing your point of reference, in other words it feels like loss of braking but is, in reality, just you braking late because you are not reading the distant corner properly.
We had this for quite awhile here in Egg at the end of the far straight, it took many weeks of driving before we were not constantly walking to the far end of the track to recover cars.
 

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Graham Windle
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4,445 Posts
another point often overlooked when wiring tracks is that every lane should have seperate positive and negative feeds .Some people seem to think that all you need is one negative between however many lanes you have , We had this problem at pendle when the track was first built (taking into account this track has mega battery power about 200 available amps) and it showed up as apparent lack of braking what it was really was power surges when some one else came off you got a bit more power pushing you on down the long straights causing you to misjudge your braking point and no doubt ending up coming off .I cured this simply by adding seperate negatives for each lane as well as the extra positive feeds.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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3,652 Posts
Grah and Swiss have both hit on the keys. Multiple power feeds (from controller stations) to several points around the track, and separate leads from the power source to each controller station, are absolutely necessary on long tracks. A common mistake (no pun intended) is to use a common ground return - this is as much a no-no as using a common positive feed. Also, the longer the track, the heavier the wiring should be. Don't try to save money on wire - it is false economy and isn't that expensive anyway.
 
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