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Hi guys!
I know that I read something similar somewhere, but I can't find it right now so:
How are you breaking in a new motor? Do you run it on 5V for some time? Do you run it it petrol or any other liquid?
Thanks, Matevz
 

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Because threads will move around on the main page and so maybe make it a little harder to find what Diffy is talking about, here is the one he means.
 

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lotus03, put in a few resistors to knock the power down around 3v-5v instead of full power. At full power the brushes bounce a lot and don't break in properly. If you aren't so good with electrical stuff then just use your controller and tape the trigger to a slow slow speed. Make sure the motor is not under any load (not mounted in the car or the rear axle pulled out).
 

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I have read an article on breaking in new motors in which they said to run the motor without power but pulled by another motor with a long axle; in short : you have two chassis fixed on the bench and a long custom made axle that connects the two, with two trasmissions; one motor runs with power and the other ( the new one) will follow passively. Have you ever experienced this way?

I did, but I have not understood if it was good or a waste of time

Ciao
 

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My cars seem to be fast enough as they are. If the get any faster I think I might get disqualified... I'll stick to my method for the moment, but if I ever need to make a killer motor, I might give that a try. BTW. faster is definatly better when you are running in an SCX RX motor, those things are tight when you first get them.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Sprint, in theory, I think a "passive" break-in should be better since the brushes will bed in without power arcing also creating extra wear or pitting on the comm. In practice, I usually break in motors at a voltage that minimizes the arcing anyway so the difference may be small indeed. Using the under-water method, break-in occurs very quickly and might even be better than the "dry passive" method since far fewer rotations are needed to bed in the brushes. But... it's all theory...


Lotus, it's tough to argue with the success you are having with your method, but I would think that the comm would be better served with a lower voltage. New motors at high voltage produce a lot of arcing which pits the comm and deposits brush material in the pits, creating a dirty surface that isn't easily cleaned by conventional methods. Lower voltage will also generate less heat, which is never good for a motor. Then again... as I said.... tough to argue with success.... but I had to say it.
 

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Thanks for the comments. It may not affect me so much as I do not expect a motor to last more than a couple of months before it is replaced. I also use a lot of Comm drops with supposedly clean the comm and get rid of motor carp. They certainly do make an improvement to motor speed and torqe, but reduce braking (due to lubrication) and motor life. I also regularly squirt the motors with Duck Oil or lighter fluid. I know this knackers the motor, but it means I can have a super quick motor without having to buy 40 of them and test them all. Some say that it's not in the spirit of things, I say they are just bitter 'cos they lost...


Lotus
 
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