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Alan Tadd
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been waiting a long time to use one of Pendle's superb new PCS32 chassis. They are ideal for the scratchbuilder and especially useful for those of us who prefer to model older cars. They have a narrow cross section, short front guide and can suit both very short and long wheelbase cars.

I also like to sometimes use some of the extensive range of lexan shells available from many suppliers around the Globe. Most of these shells are finished in both scale size and "handling" width, i.e 2.5". The normal method to mount these shells to a chassis is to use mounting pins through the base of the shell which fit into small diameter tubing either soldered or glued to the side pans of the receiving chassis. This is not really possible with this chassis as the side pans are located not at the base of the chassis but some way up the side. I'm not really sure why Pendle chose to construct the chassis with this arrangement for the side pans perhaps someone could explain.

The method I have used is to mount the shell via mounting posts :-

The picture below shows stage one (Apologise for the quality, but do you realise how difficult it is to photograph clear shells?)



Lexan shells should be painted on the inside so mounting posts to the shell directly is not possible as it would ruin the appearance of the paint finish. The method I use is to attach the posts to the chassis and roughly set the posts to the correct height so that the body sits squarely on the posts.
Next when you have noted where the posts touch the shell paint that area with your top coat, in my case Revell Enamel (yes enamel) British Green. Leave this to dry for at least a day.
Next cut to length two pieces of wooden coffee stirrer,, (thin balsa would be as good) and attach to the shell with a PVA based adhesive, you must make sure that no adhesive finds it's way onto an unpainted section of the shell.
When this is dry place the shell on the chassis and complete your final levelling work to ensure the body fits correctly.
Next, apply two part resin epoxy adhesive to the wooden plates and carefully place your body and tighten the fixing screws. Again it is essential not to allow the epoxy to touch any of your paintwork. Allow one day for this to set.

Picture two shows the shell with the mounting posts attached :-



I construct my mounting posts from Plastistrut in two parts. The inner section is of the same diameter as the mounting screw. The outer casing is made up of slightly larger diameter Plastistrut superglued to the inner post.

Next complete the painting of the interior of the shell.

The finished car :-





This is a very easy way to use this excellent chassis with a much wider variety of bodies than those available from kits or the major manufacturers. It is also a very inexpensive way of building a slot car.

Regards

Alan
 

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Superb Alan
, love those Bristols, great wheels, where are they from?
 

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QUOTE (BEEJAY7 @ 22 Nov 2004, 21:51)Revell Enamel (yes enamel) British Green.<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Raised eyebrow here!

Does that really stick? I remember painting a 1:24 Ford MkIV lexan in enamel spraypaint and it shed paint faster than.. than.... well my old 1:1 Ford Puma in fact. I evantually stripped it for a proper repaint by applying tape to the paint then lifting it all off. If brushpainting I only now use craft acrylics or Parma Faskolor.

Or do you just not crash very often?

Coop
 

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Alan Tadd
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Marlon

As you know the wheels on the 450 were somewhat unique to say the least.. and I spent ages trying to find something suitable. The ones I used in the end, although not 100% accurate were a fair match for the originals, (at least they had 5 spokes!), and are repainted MRRC Cobra wheels.

Coop, I wondered if anyone would question the use of enamel..
. I used this paint on my lexan cars in the 60's, which had a lot more hard use than any of my cars today, and yes it did chip but was very easy to patch up, and to be honest the shells used to break up long before the paint started to look really tatty. Nowadays I use two coats of enamel, hand painted,to acheived the required paint density, followed by a coat or two of Klear to seal the paintwork.It seems to work well.

As for my driving improving...well I think it's more a case of these cars being a lot slower than my Group 20 equiped brass X-framed cars of the 60's, so the crashes tend to be a lot less, shall we say. spectacular!.

REgards

Alan
 

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QUOTE (JohnP @ 23 Nov 2004, 11:17)Nicely done Alan. I havn't seen Pendle's chassis up close but I'm just wondering if it would be practical to fit the pin tubes either under the pans or maybe cut a slot for them?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The pans themselves aren't that wide so unless you were mounting a wide body with a gap twixt body and pan I don't think you'd have enough length to get the required flex in the pin.

Something I've thought of trying for lexan mounting but never got around to is to glue balsa onto the chassis and then stick the (slightly bent) pins into that. I've generally thought about this when trying to stick pins into pin holes while the body sides were already painted as then the problem of lining up pin and hole sort of vanishes. For metal chassis (obviously not the PCS32) it would be a no-solder option as well. Anyone tried this as an alternative to brass/aluminium tubing?

Coop
 

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Alan Tadd
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
John....Suggest the Hot Chocolate with marshmallows. Of course you will need more than one cup!. These chassis are very good. Sean recommends the Ninco guide, but I tend to replace that with the TSRF one.

Coop.....My initial thoughts were the same as yours and I actually tried it first of all. In fact the balsa sections are still attached to the underside of this chassis. I'm afraid it wasn't very successful. The difficulty being keeping the tubing in one position after fixing it to the balsa. It tended to wobble about a lot and the holes in the balsa just got larger, even after using two part epoxy to fit the tubes. A hardwood might be a better choice. Using pins only was even worse as the balsa is too soft to stop the holes elongating.

I must admit even if the pin system had worked I much prefer this method as it does get rid of those pin heads which would always show.

Phil...I got it from Bruce Patterson......You could nip over a get one....
. It would make a decent Proxy car.

Regards

Alan
 
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