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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, my first post here.

I have come up with a bit of a potentially nutty idea. I want to make my own micro scalextric track (1:64). I say it may be a nutty idea because I've not seen anyone else do it on micro stuff only on standard (1:32). My main reason is for space. I would like to make a portable track to use at charity fundraising events so I might have to make it in sections and connect it together, which is not a huge issue as it will be in "sets" so each setting can be a block and they can be connected with some straights if need be.

I've looked around and found that there is a fair amount of materials for 1:32 scale stuff but nothing for 1:64 stuff. I've bought some 5mm copper tape to experiment with but I'm worried about the sharp bends and kinking of the tape as I'm going to be doing some tighter bends as the scale is smaller.

I've heard mentioning of braid on here but not sure what it is and how easy it is to use as opposed to tape or the costs.

Any advice and thoughts welcome
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
HO ? is that another term for micro scalextric ?

Thank you for the link, I tried searching but was swamped with 1:32 stuff and nothing for 1:64
 

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Ting Tong
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hi
i am no 1:64 exp.ert but can say that magna braid is used because it allows for magna traction to still be used for cars as it would on standard rails.

Copper tape is much easier and quicker to lay as it does not require a rebate to be machined for the braid to sit in.
 

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QUOTE (Sparky Labs @ 10 Jul 2011, 09:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>HO ? is that another term for micro scalextric ?

Thank you for the link, I tried searching but was swamped with 1:32 stuff and nothing for 1:64
Micro Scalextric is one of many brands of HO size slot cars.
HO slot cars are nominally 1/64.
HO slot cars usually use one of the standard HO chassis under lots of different bodies. As there are considerable differences in the size of the real cars, in some cases 1/64 is very nominal
Scratch built HO tracks normally use rails rather than magnabraid to achieve magnet traction, although braid could be used.

Having build several tracks with both braid and tape, my experience is that it only takes slightly longer to build a track with braid than tape. The extra time is taken to rout the braid recess, but time is saved as laying braid in the recess is quicker than laying tape on the surface.
 

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Have you already invested in Micro Scalextric? The reason I ask is that 1/43 might be a good alternative for what you aim to do It's small, but not so small it's too difficult for small fingers. . You can get a lot of track in a small area, and there are several people on the forums that have delved into routed tracks in this scale. Carera Go is the most popular line in this scale, but there is also SCX Compact, and soon, Kyosho. Here is a brilliant example: Radiator Springs track This track used Magnabraid, but others use copper tape. The 1/43 cars have braid pickups like 1/32 and 1/24 slot cars.
 

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You'd be better off making a track from Tomy AFX track if you want to do a track in 1:64, have a word with Tony Stacey (slowracer on slotforum) he runs a 1:64 racing club at Yelling in Cambridgeshire which isn't far from Rushden, I think his next club meeting is Wednesday, go along and take a look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for the replies. My only investment in any equipment so far is a grand champions 1/64 set and two spare cars: quite expendable.

I've not seen anything in 1/42 scale advertised, where would I get cars for example ? I've noticed that even 1/32 is not that popular with scalextric themselves only carrying 1 piece of track but I'm certainly wiling to look into it.

I do not wish the track to be magnetic in any case as it removes any competition at all, I set up the set i bought and had a hard time getting a car off the track as the magnets held it in place. I'd be inclined to put some weight into the cars instead.

I have a dremel and i think you can get the appropriate attachment to make it into a router.

Unfortunately I'm busy wednesdays but I'll give it some thought after some ground work, seeing another setup will certainly help in understanding how it works
 

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Micro Scalextric cars without magnets are uncontrollable - you can push the magnets out of the chassis if you want to try it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (Julian_Boolean @ 10 Jul 2011, 15:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Micro Scalextric cars without magnets are uncontrollable - you can push the magnets out of the chassis if you want to try it.

even if I add some weight to the back ?
 

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The most reliable routed HO tracks I've seen use continuous wire for the power rails. Building an HO track using this method, because of the tolerances involved, is not a trivial task. I'd recommend building a simple oval first, for practice, before tackling a large layout.

Check out a builder named Brad Bowman of Brad's Tracks. IMHO, his HO tracks are the finest available. He used to sell a track routing guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
by continuos wire do you mean bare solid copper wire glued down to the board ? this had been my initial idea when I decided to make a track, my only wory was that I'd get glue over the wire and loose electrical contact but i suppose I can rub it off later
 

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Most continuous wire rails are I've seen are mild steel. I haven't seen copper wire rails, although I suppose it could be used. However, I suspect copper may be too soft and prone to oxidation.

For continuous wire rail, the wire doesn't lay on the surface of the track; the wire is laid down into its own routed channel that is cut into the surface. Only a small portion of the wire projects above the surface plane of the track. So you must route three (3) separate slots for each lane - one slot for the guide pin, and two smaller slots for the power rails.

The power rail is then anchored into the slot with a separate, plastic insulated wire, often color coded, that is inserted into the slot with the power rail. The insulated wire "locks", or "wedges", the power rail in the slot. Glue is also used. The glue adds strength, and yes, don't worry about the glue - you can clean it up.

There is actually a substantial body of knowledge regarding routed HO tracks, with several tried and tested methods. Check out the HO forums; those folks should have plenty of info for you. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
hm, gluing copper wire down sounds good to me, i was going to put something down under the wheels and outside of the base to lift the car body a bit as I want some steep ups and downs without pinning the the car on a high spot so maybe I'd not need to set the power rails in a slot.

My next mad bit is to build a lane changeover so that cars coming of a single lane can get back onto individual lanes (i have devised a way of running two cars on one lane and still having independent control)
 

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QUOTE (ThaiRacer @ 10 Jul 2011, 17:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Most continuous wire rails are I've seen are mild steel. I haven't seen copper wire rails, although I suppose it could be used. However, I suspect copper may be too soft and prone to oxidation.
Think you'll find the mild steel rails are plated, rust is a real problem with plain mild steel
Rust tends to appear sooner rather than latter unless the plating is decent quality.

Copper tape has provided good service on 1/32 and 1/24 tracks for well over 40 years so I wouldn't worry about that not being up to the job.
Of course copper doesn't give any magnet attraction which may or may not be an issue for Sparky Labs
 

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Sparky, you asked about a source of 1/43 cars. Here is a source that advertises here so I think it's okay to post a link On Tracks Carerra page. Though I do have to admit to being shocked at the prices. Most can be gotten in the US for less than $20.

That setting rails into the routed track sounds awfully fussy.
Copper tape is not bad at all to work with.
 

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Rich Dumas
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If HO slot cars were really 1/64th scale they would not fit on standard HO set type track. HO trains are 1/87th scale, only a few of the early HO scale slot cars were that small. The bulk of today's cars are 1/70ish. The only true 1/64th track is MaxTrax, which is sectional and made of Sintra (PVC). Four and six lane sections are available and the sections are joined with stainless steel keys that make both the electrical and mechanical connections. It would be very easy to make a portable track using MaxTrax, too bad that it is rather costly. The four lane sections are 10.5 inches (26.7 cm) wide.
 

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QUOTE (Sparky Labs @ 10 Jul 2011, 16:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Unfortunately I'm busy wednesdays but I'll give it some thought after some ground work, seeing another setup will certainly help in understanding how it works

Its a pity that your busy on Wednesdays, if you came along to SCHORC you would learn a lot about HO and quickly, pitfalls, plus points and non mag cars!!
 
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