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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of Repete digified Parma controllers that I bought a few years ago. They don't have a brake button, only the lane change button.

I would like to add a brake button so I can take advantage of the various functions (aside from braking) that use the button - in particular, the car programming.

Can someone tell me what it would take to add a brake button and how to wire it in?

Cheers

Andrew
 

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David K Phillipson
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I have a repete parma that had a brake button, it had one on the front and one on the back
Unfortunately the wiring for the brake button broke off and we couldnt see where it had broken off from so it was removed
But to part answer your question Yes you can add the brake button but cant tell you how
 

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Living the Life!
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In theory, all you need to do is add an additional resistance into the circuit which is attached to a non-latching switch. Without measuring a scaley controller, I believe the value to be around the 8k mark.

The throttle is from 0-5k, pressing the LC adds another discreet amount and the brakes yet another amount. The PB can detect what combination of things are pressed by the total value of the resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Greg

I'll stick an ohmmeter across the scaley controller to see what it should be. It all seems so simple.

Cheers

Andrew
 

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Greg Gaub
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As I recall, the resistor values are printed on the PCB that the buttons are connected to. Just take a controller apart to see the intended values.
 

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Jumping the gun as ususal, but if it works can you give us dertail,s a new controller and wireless from SSDC would be great and perhaps a short term alternative to OXYGEN
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, that all worked nicely.

It was a pretty simple process (I managed to make it appear difficult though). I checked the PCB and the resistor value is 18K, which I also confirmed with the ohmmeter.

After purchasing a lovely domed momentary switch and drilling the side of the case to hold it, it then occurred to me that I had purchased a "normally open" SDST switch, but what I needed was a "normally closed" switch. [insert emoticon for "you bloody idiot" here]

I was amazed at how difficult it is to find a NC momentary switch of the right sort of size. I found one that was too big (long) to fit without fouling one thing or another, but ended up using a DPDT mom switch and just cut off the excess terminals. The only place I could find to fit it was in the base of the handle - which is no drama, as I only want to use it for programming cars and track calls.

As for the wiring, thath part was easy - simply desoldered the 'return' wire and soldered it to one of the switch terminals, then inserted a wire from the PCB to the other terminal, and soldered the 18K resistor across teh two terminals. So when the switch is closed (normal) the current flows freely, and when the button is pushed and the switch opens, the current is forced to travel through the resistor.

Thanks to all for your assistance.

Cheers

Andrew
 
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