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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A while back my son bought a Carrera Evolution Pontiac GTO (Flames). The back of the clear plastic case had a sticker stating "For use only with Max. 14.8v Carrera Evolution transformers".

We've run this on a large 'custom power' Scalextric track and our home Ninco wall wart powered track without any noticable issues.

What's the reason for the warning, and is it actually an issue?

pupkick
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
haha, now there's one way to replay "Back to the Future" and the "fire wheels down the street" on your home track.


pupkick
 

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QUOTE (pupkick @ 10 Jun 2004, 05:59)For use only with Max. 14.8v Carrera Evolution transformers
As one of the Carrera resellers in the UK Past comments are correct.

This sticker represents maximum running voltage or there is a chance of the engine life becoming shorter.

The other issue you are aware of is that the guide needs to be filed down to fit 1/32nd scale tracks like Scalextric and SCX.

As a service upon request we supply a Slot.It Guide FOC to assist clients who may not be confident to make the adjustment.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, the guide looks like it was taken from a 1:8th scale slot car, it's crazy big.. but seems to work just fine in my Ninco track.

I figured it was just a "recomendation" on the power, but figured I'd ask anyway. Thanks for the responses.

pupkick
 

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...there is also an original repalcement Carrera-guide available for other tracks with smaller slots - if you run these cars on Sclextric / SCX or on Ninco - the original guide is to thick for a smooth run on Ninco and to high for Scalextric-classic-track.
About the 14,8V of Carrera - -in Germany Scalextric-cars are sold with a sticker mentioning max 12V
 

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One can also point out that Carrera is also selling 1/24 cars which have another transfo with more volts.

As they use the same track, one could be tempted to use the 1/24 transfo for 1/32 cars, hence the caution.
 

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Hmmm... Stupid questin cometh!!

So what if you did run the smaller cars with the bigger pack? Would the thing explode? Also, are the motors in the 1/24s very different from the 1/32 cars?

-Maltese
 

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QUOTE (Maltese @ 10 Jun 2004, 20:46)Hmmm... Stupid questin cometh!!

So what if you did run the smaller cars with the bigger pack? Would the thing explode? Also, are the motors in the 1/24s very different from the 1/32 cars?

-Maltese
Yes, the 1:24 cars have different motors, they are running with 18 Volt.

And no, the smaller Evolution cars will not explode
just their motors will become really hot und maybe blow up if you run them with more than 15 Volts for a langer time.
 

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Hi

Hmmm

Are the motors different between 1/24 and 1/32, you bet. a LOT different. The 1/24 motors are long stack slow torquey motors and at 18 volts give about the same top speed as the 1/32s do on 10 volts.

The 1/32 cars use a 3ohm wind which is half again hotter than the similar looking scaley motor, but is geared all wrong. That wrong gearing means that the motor wants to draw more AMPs than otherwise(the "bigger" 1/24 pack does not supply more amps). And leaves you with no brakes and poor acceleration. If you run them on a track with a 20meter straight, however, they will run away from the other 1/32s...until you need brakes!

Anyway, mabuchi lists the 1/32 motor as a "6 volt" motor, but 12 is safe, 18 is pushing it.

Fate
 

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QUOTE (ProfFate @ 11 Jun 2004, 16:15)The 1/32 cars use a 3ohm wind which is half again hotter than the similar looking scaley motor, but is geared all wrong. That wrong gearing means that the motor wants to draw more AMPs than otherwise(the "bigger" 1/24 pack does not supply more amps). And leaves you with no brakes and poor acceleration. If you run them on a track with a 20meter straight, however, they will run away from the other 1/32s...until you need brakes!
I think you are talking about the "old" Evo cars with 10:26 gear ratio... the new ones have 9:27 (like Ninco, Fly etc.) and also a new motor, they brake well.

And the bigger 1/24 power supply pack does provide more amps, 2x 600 mA while the small Evolution power supply only has 2x 350 mA (but both is not enough).
 

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WOW!! I really appreciate the response, gentlemen. I figured the motors might be similar because I heard some guys saying they were putting Ninco NC5 and NC6 Crushers in their hard-body 1/24 cars. Aren't those motors too underpowered for that?

I appreciate your bearing with me on one last question which I think will solve it for me:

My Scaley power supply says 16 volts and 13VA... well, from my recent education that means the power supply is giving just under an amp...maybe .60-75. Why in the world do the cars say (as well as everyone) keep referring to 12 volts?


If 16 volts is only 2 volts from 18 should not that be enough to make the mabuchi smoke ... or...do those two volts make that much of a difference? I am trying to figure out what the power supply is saying versus what is posted on the car and why they do not match.

This will help me a lot...I will graduate after this (I think)
I WILL be an expert!!

Thanks,

Maltese
 

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Unfortunately the voltage figures mentioned on motors and power supplies of cheap mass-produced equipment are of limited value. Not meaningless but close to it in many cases!

1. They vary quite a lot due to production tolerances
2. A safety margin is built in to at least partially cover the tendency of power maniacs to push things to the limit and beyond!

Prof Fate and others are absolutely acknowledged masters in this field and Fate has already correctly pointed out that many Mabuchi motors are manufacturer rated at only 3-6 volts. One takes this as allowing an ample safety margin as mentioned previously.

The figure of 12 volts is historic, being based on the nominal voltage of a standard car battery. (Although a freshly charged '12 volt' battery actually achieves around 13.2 volts which quickly falls to 12 volts shortly after completion of charging). Many early model train power supplies were rated at 12 volt nominal for this this specific reason, making the transformers, batteries and battery chargers pretty much interchangeable - this made a lot of sense then and still does now. I am an absolute believer in using 12 volts as THE standard by which all our equipment should be compared. A fixed and agreed standard is absolutely essential if comparisons are to be meaningful or useful. Once there is an establishe baseline, then it is easier to make sense of subsequent variations from that baseline. In fact, without, it, almost nothing makes sense.

ALL motors will inevitably deteriorate with use and the higher the voltage applied, the faster this will happen, due to both higher temperatures and increased mechanical fatigue from increased rotational velocity. Unfortunately it's a form of quick (and very cheap) fix to make a motor run faster by application of increased voltage, but it WILL reduce its life. The trick is to obtain an acceptable balance of price/performance/durability and, unfortunately, different manufacturers set their sights in slightly different areas of this area.

A comment on that Scalextric PSU figure of "16 volts"
This is a nominal figure which, just like any other quoted figure, will vary some due to manufacturing tolerances. You can expect +/- around 1 volt on that. Then you must also realise that in the Scalextric case, this is AC, not DC. This is converted (rectified) to DC in the Scalextric power base and that process loses something around another volt or two.
WARNING: This Scalextric peculiarity in taking AC current to the track is what dictates that Scalextric PSUs are NOT interchangeable with most other slot manufacturers' PSUs. This is a damned nuisance but is a fact and must not be forgotten.
 

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QUOTE (Tropi @ 13 Jun 2004, 12:06)Prof Fate and others are absolutely acknowledged masters in this field and Fate has already correctly pointed out that many Mabuchi motors are manufacturer rated at only 3-6 volts. One takes this as allowing an ample safety margin as mentioned previously.
Are you sure ?
As I know, there are many Mabuchi motors that look identical, but are different inside. That means, you cannot decide wehether it's a 6 Volt motor (e.g. for a small non-slotracing toy) or a 12 Volt motor.
In addition to that, Mabuchi and other manufacturers produce motors according to the needs of their customers (Carrera, Scalextric etc.). And I cannot believe that the big slotcar labels just ignore a specification of 3-6 Volts and give them 12 instead.
 

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Yes, I am sure.
This alone doesn't necessarily mean I am right of course!

However, I trust the immense depth of knowledge available from our REAL motor experts and, in slightly different phraseology, I think we will find that they all say much the same things.

Technically, there is no such thing as a '6 volt' motor or a '12 volt' motor'. They are simply motors that the manufacturers are reasonably confident will give a satisfactory combination of performance and durability at those nominal figures and therefore onto which they feel safe in attaching a label that describes them (very approximately) in terms of that nominal voltage.
 

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Well, I know that manufacturers like Fly or Carrera have motors that are especially produced for them... maybe it's the same with Scalextric etc.
So it would make no sense that e.g. Carrera gives more power to the cars than the motors are declared with.
 
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