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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Until this very day the ingenious Penelope Pitlane SMJ chassis has been the answer to all my prayers concerning early F1 cars from the fifties.

But just starting on some projects including David Sykes resin bodies a new challange has awaken.

Here everything seems OK



With a good help of the Dremel it might just be possible to squeeze it in to the Ferrari 555



But the Gordini T16 goes over my skills



Anybody knows of an even more tiny chassis then the PP type on the market?

/Holger
 

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Looks like you may have to modify the chassis rear to massage it into place, meaning narrow it. I would cut the bushing towers aft of the motor, move them in the desired amount, realign and silver solder into place. On the other hand you could scratchbuild a chassis from brass plate and rod. That way you get exactly what you need. Hope this helps, or gives you some ideas.
 

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Rich Dumas
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If it was me I would use oilite bearings that were turned so that the flange was on the inside of the chassis and solder them in place. Excess material on the outside of the chassis could be ground off if necessary. You could also narrow the chassis at the rear by making cuts in the pan with a Dremel, squeezing the chassis and soldering it back together.
 

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Johnny Fuglestad
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PP also have chassis that are narrower, with the FF motor rotated 90 degree.

At Pendle they are called PPSK1s. chassis width 13mm.
 

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You think youve got problems, ive got to squeeze that motor in a Watson Offy indy car. No way round it, its all gotta be scratchbuilt, inc the working steering. John
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Guys - thanks a lot. Many good ideas, but as my skills are really limited I will vote for the PP SK1s chassis solution.

I wonder why I have never seen this PP SK1s before? I have to improve my research.

/Holger
 

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How about modifying the existing chassis?
Looks like you needs to cut away quite a bit of the brass behind the back axle,
Bending up a piano wire brace to fit behind the axle - it needs to be the right shape to hide under the body, and of course it has to clear the gear - sort of U shaped 18 gauge / 1.2 mm should be sufficient.
Make it so it lays inside the brass chassis under the back axle, solder in place. Ordinary solder is more than adequate for this sort of use. The chassis is now strengthened so the brass can be cut away.
Ideally soldered in brass bearings rather than clip in plastic would be better, but if you find the plastic ones OK the use them.
 

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Hi Holger.

I built up one of Dave's excellent shells and used a PP chassis but as someone suggested earlier I used the SK1s chassis which I find very useful.



You have to shorten the front axle bearer and guide blade holder to allow them to slide further back. The pictures below may explain.





I hope that is of some help.

Kind regards

Eric
 

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Eric - it does - a lot! Thanks.

But what would interest me is how the chassis and the shell are connected. Could you please send one more photo of the innerside of the shell with the chassis removed?

NB! Glad to see how my Gordinis should turn out
Hope my skills can live up to the challange.

/Holger
 

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Hi Holger

If you look at the chassis you will see a hole drilled where the PP logo is. A small screw goes through there and into a nut fixed into a plastic tube that has
been trimmed to length and fixed to the body with epoxy glue. It is a little clearer in the picture below from another car I am building.



So:
Drill hole in chassis to allow screw through
Fix small nut in the end of some plastic tube that is the approximate length.
Srew this assembly to the chassis
Offer this up to the body and trim the end so the body sits on the chasssis correctly
Mix some two part epoxy up and put a small pool on the body where the post sits.
Make sure you 'key' the body so the glue will stick.
Allow to set.
Now undo the screw and the post will remain attached to the body.
Add some more glue to the base of the post if required.

You now have a body mounting post

Cheers
Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Eric - I fully understand your description and way of work. I roughly do it the same way myself.

But looking at your Gordini from beneath, I miss a second screw. I can only locate the one in the PP logo. Will one single srew ssecure the body in a satisfied way? I am missing one at the rear end of the car.

/Holger
 

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Holger, with a body that small a single screw will do it especially if its not subject to hard racing, do you race your cars?

If you want to put one in at the rear there's plenty of room either side of the motor shaft to drill another hole in the chassis and put another post in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
MAF - you may be right there, since as you say, I do only drive my cars for pleasure - not race them.

Just ordered some SK1s chassis´s from my favourite web dealer, so I will start having a go with a single screw.

/Holger
 

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Just remembered. Never solder oilite bushes. you wont get a very neat finish and you,ll bubble out all the oil thats held inside them. use a fast set epoxy and a quick wipe with acetone. john
 

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I seldom solder bushings in either. I usually cook off the oil that's in them with an old soldering iron, or a small butane torch, as the oil in them isn't of very good quality, then clean them with naptha, or lacquer thinner, let them air dry, and mount them with Loctite stud and bearing mount adhesive. The Loctite only works with metal surfaces. It will not set up on plastics. It is very effective, and I have never had any come loose, even when racing the cars. Use your favorite oil on them after it cures, normally overnight.
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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It is OK to solder oillite bushes in, BUT while they are still hot run some oil into them, the hot bush will absorb some of the oil. I tend to use Slick 7 brass bushes as they are very close tolerance.
 

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You are right phil, but to do it properly you have to soak the oilites in acetone to remove the oil. when you solder them on a lot of the oil matrix is filled with solder, sorta defeating the object of using oilites. thats a good tip, immersing the hot oilites in oil. funny i use slick sevens also, but i run a 3mm drill into them to leave a contact patch of 1&1/2mm to rub on the axle. john
 
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