SlotForum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Lenny Broke
Joined
·
318 Posts
Evenin' All

I was having a think about a chassis for my proxy F1 car. It seems a lot of guys are going for the traditional brass and piano wire type.

Just to add a bit of variety I thought I might try an aluminium sheet chassis bonded together with 2 part epoxy resin (aryldite).

I thought I would use the good old popsicle stick chassis layout as a basis for construction around an ex CD-rom drive motor.

For transmission I am planning to use a slotit crown wheel and pinion set 8:24.

Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers
Lenny
 

·
Dennis Samson
Joined
·
807 Posts
I guess as long as you have space to add lead where you need it, then carbon fiber or aluminum will work. The brass and piano wire construction has two major advantages:

1. Soldering is still the most effective way of joining pieces together and popsicle sticks, aluminum and carbon fiber don't solder too well!
2. Brass is inherently heavy, so the weight is built in, and the weight is low. Lead weights placed on top of other materials might be heavier, but will also be higher.
 

·
Brian Ferguson
Joined
·
3,652 Posts
Lenny, if you have an idea, go for it! That's what scratchbuilding is all about. Experiment. Try different designs and different materials. Especially if you feel comfortable with a particular method!


QUOTE You must get really cheap brass

aBill, if you can buy carbon fibre cheaper, let me know the source!
I have less than two dollars invested in my brass-based F1 chassis, including piano wire and tubing.
Time, yes... money, no.
...story of my life....
 

·
Lenny Broke
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mornin' All
Thanks for your replies guy's
My main concern is the strength of the bond with the 2 part epoxy resin.
I'll build one anyway, just to try it.
Cost is not a factor, a quick visit to the scrap bin in the sheet metal shop at work should take care of materials.
The use of aluminiun is sort of appropriate I reckon as well, some of the late 60's cars being aluminium monocoques from memory (lotus 49????)
Cheers Lenny
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
hi, Lenny
about the 2 part resin bond...make sure you clean the aluminum with fine sandpaper immediately before bonding and you'll be fine (you could also use a Liguid Aluminum type glue which may bond better and actually be more rugged). as for aluminum versus other materials...lightness (in my opinion) only works to your advantage if you want to put the weights you will then have to add, somewhere other than where the chassis structure is. So...if you want to concentrate the weight in specific locations, aluminum (or carbon fiber which is even stiffer for its weight as I recall) are a great idea.

good luck with it!!

John
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
QUOTE (lenny broke @ 26 Sep 2004, 00:04)The use of aluminiun is sort of appropriate I reckon as well, some of the late 60's cars being aluminium monocoques from memory (lotus 49????)
Lenny - You're right, they used aluminium, steel and magnesium skinned chassis in the F1 cars of the 1960s. There was also a material with the trade name "Mallite" that was a sandwich of aluminium and another material (which I can't remember) possibly foam styrene or similar and these sheets were bonded together so your idea is very much in the spirit of the period. It will be good to see your results.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
QUOTE Soldering is still the most effective way of joining pieces together

Can't say I agree with that. I'd take epoxy anyday. It's easier, more permanent, and stronger. What more could you want?

QUOTE I have less than two dollars invested in my brass-based F1 chassis, including piano wire and tubing

Can't beat that, but I bet it would surprise you to know that it would cost just £1.50 for the amount of CF that you would need to make the 60's F1 chassis... tehe... bet you want to know where I get it from now, eh?

McLaren
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
A sheet of 1.397mm x 280mm x 203mm, (.055" x 11" x 8") = $30.00 from my supplier, and I'm sure he's not the cheapest. I don't know what an equivalant sheet of brass would cost. Grade 2 Titanium would be $48.00 for a 0.05" x 12" x 12" sheet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,457 Posts
I think "Grade 2 Titanium" might be a bit overboard, but CF is perfect for making chassis out of. It's easy to manipulate, it's light, strong and looks cool
.

Russell is close, remember I went to Spa this year...


Seriously though, I'm not too sure if I want the board flooded with CF chassis... I like the exclusivity!

But I'm sure you guys can knock out some great examples so here's the link.

McLaren
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
QUOTE (David Lawson @ 26 Sep 2004, 09:30)QUOTE (lenny broke @ 26 Sep 2004, 00:04) The use of aluminiun is sort of appropriate I reckon as well, some of the late 60's cars being aluminium monocoques from memory (lotus 49????)
Lenny - You're right, they used aluminium, steel and magnesium skinned chassis in the F1 cars of the 1960s. There was also a material with the trade name "Mallite" that was a sandwich of aluminium and another material (which I can't remember) possibly foam styrene or similar and these sheets were bonded together so your idea is very much in the spirit of the period. It will be good to see your results.

David
I think Mallite was used by Bruce McLaren for his first F1 car, it being a sandwich of Aluminium and end grain balsa wood.

Regards
Mark
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Thanks Mark, I didn't realise it was balsa. That reminds me that Brian Hart raced a plywood chassis F2 car in the 1960s.

David
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top