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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i know there is a thread about chassis jigs but it seems to be mainly us jigs.Is there anybody in the uk doing jigs or am i just as well building my own?
 

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build your own. a jig size piece of corian[any colour] is about £6 inc postage. all you need is a scriber, centre punch, rule and a set square. use silver steel for the location pins. you might have to buy a reamer for the size of pins you decide on. go for the cheapest reamer 1/8 and under because different sizes under 1/8 - 3mm are different in price. john
 

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QUOTE (martin yorkston @ 1 May 2012, 08:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>i know there is a thread about chassis jigs but it seems to be mainly us jigs.Is there anybody in the uk doing jigs or am i just as well building my own?
How much of a good idea is it to build your own jig? Depends how good are you at making things accurately.

The SCD jig is good if you don't want to build your own.

Some builders don't use a jig. Just a FLAT piece of something head resistant, squared paper to get everything square and in the right place and and a gear on either end of the axle to get that level. Works well for a builder with sufficient skill at doing things that way.

You can mail order stuff direct from the US, some have never had any problems with that, others have got caught with import duty and handling charges at the point of entry into the UK.
 

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Russell Sheldon
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I completely agree that the SCD chassis jig is excellent and I've used one for as long as Eddie has, but having replaced it with a Precision Slot Cars 1/32nd scale CSCRA spec jig, I can honestly say that the PSC jig is a worthwhile investment.



The jig is extremely versatile and covers just about all the specifications for the various CSCRA 1/32nd scale classes:-



Wheelbase:
From as short as 7' 4" (2.75" - 70mm scale) for 1960s Grand Prix and Sports/GT cars; to 10' 4" (3.87" - 98mm) for pre-war Grand Prix cars and late 1970s and 1980s NASCAR chassis, in 2mm increments. Additionally, the rear axle can be set at minus or plus 1mm, extending the wheelbase options even further.

Overall width:
50mm, 54mm, 58mm, 61mm, 63mm, 64mm

Motor orientation:
Anglewinder, sidewinder and inline chassis configuration are possible, for FC-130, FK-130, FK-180, FF-050 and FF-030 motors.

Axles:
3/32" or 2mm rear axles; 3/32" or 1/16" front axles.

Jig wheels:


For classes requiring a minimum of 1.5mm ground clearance, which covers Sports/GT, Saloon/Touring and F1 & Indy/CART/IRL car classes (including Sports Prototypes, Can-Am, Group C, IMSA, Group 2, Group 5, Trans Am, NASCAR, F1 and Indy cars) from 1963 to 1993:
4-sizes front jig wheels: 16mm, 17mm, 18mm, 19mm (for 1.5mm ground clearance - 3/32" axles / with sleeves for 1/16" axles)
4-sizes rear jig wheel: 19mm, 20mm, 21mm, 21.5mm (for 1.5mm ground clearance - 3/32" axles)
For classes requiring a minimum of 2mm ground clearance (1950s/60s Grand Prix, Indy and F1 cars, although it covers rules for cars from 1934 through 1988):
4-sizes of front wheel diameter: 19mm, 20mm, 21.5mm, 23mm (for 2mm ground clearance - 3/32" axles / with sleeves for 1/16" axles)
4-sizes of rear wheel diameter: 20mm, 21.5mm, 24mm, 26mm (for 2mm ground clearance - 3/32" axles)
Guide pivot:
Since many 1/32nd chassis designs incorporate a central spine or flexi hinge, the slot for the guide post only extends from 68mm ahead of the rear axle (or 67mm if the +1mm rear axle position is used.



This really is a top quality product. All lines and dimensions are engraved and precise.

There is also an "American" version available, with Imperial measurements.

With kind regards,

Russell
 

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QUOTE (stoner @ 3 May 2012, 11:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>a jig size piece of corian[any colour] is about £6 inc postage.
Please can you point me in the right direction to buy some?
After some googling all I've managed to find is jig size pieces at much higher prices - obviously I'm looking in the wrong places!
 

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David Farrow
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Hi Russell.

It looks like a very good piece of kit. I would love to have a set of the set-up blocks but there not listed, you must have some specials there that are not available to the general public.

There are so many things seen on this forum that are just too hard to get..No web site, not listed on websites, out of date web sites and so on. I know I have mentioned this before but if the stuff was easier to get then more would be sold.

Df
 

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John Roche
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Hi David,

I have one of the Precision slot cars jigs, it came with the set up blocks. E-mail Dave, he's really helpful. He adapted one for me one suitable for 1/32 and 1/8 axles to suit the vintage type stuff I build.

I still have my trusty old SCD jig too.

Cheers

John
 

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John Roche
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Hi Martin,

Maybe I PM'd him over on Slotblog then, it was a while ago so I'm not sure.
 

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I tend to make my own jig each time I build a car. Draw round the bodyshell on a piece of paper - measure back 7.5mm from the front edge - that'll be the centre of the guide if you're going to use a Slot-it trailing guide. Mark the centre point of the wheel arches for the axle lines, then transfer axle lines and guide centre onto a piece of MDF or similar. Make sure the axle lines are parallel, then evostick a 1/32 axle on each line. When firm, drill 4 1/32 holes up against each axle (either side and each end). Now pull off the axles and clean up the glue residue with lighter fuel. Drill a 9/64 hole where the guide centre is and hey presto - you've got a jig.
Mark
 

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I'd be interested to hear more about experiences with jigs made with Corian

Corian is made by DuPont, their data sheet says it can be thermoformed into new shapes at 160 degrees C
The ordinary 60/40 solder starts melting at more than 20 degrees C above that, and some builders use higher melting point solder.
Soldering irons have to be some way above the melting point of solder to work properly, tip temperatures of 260 degrees C are typical
I tried putting a hot soldering iron on a Corian off cut, and the Corian melted.
A hot soldering iron makes no differance to an SCD jig even if left there all day.
 

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Hello from PSC,
All emails and questions have been answered.
I had problems with my account here on slotforum, seems to be good now.
If you have questions please PM me.

300SLR.
Corian from Dupont is a thermoformed material for ease of fabrication.
PSC stopped using Corian over a year ago,the new material is a non thermoformable solid surface material,
and is unaffected by the heat from your soldering iron. The combination of acid flux
and heat for the soldering iron will stain the surface very slightly. Thousands of scratch built
chassis's have been built on this material by hundreds of builders with no warping of the fixture
or cracking between the holes. Our material is the thickest available with two choices.
.800 thick or 1.200 thick.

Thanks Russell Sheldon for your help.

Dave Mountz
 

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300 slr have,nt read this thread for a while. i got my pieces from the corian man on ebay. just search for corian and he,ll pop up with offcuts. you can email him for a specific size-colour and he,ll cut it for you. ivory is dearer than other colours because knife makers use it for handles. you can get white and any other colour. corian is the material of choice for most jig manufactures. john
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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Usually with a visit to a local joinery shop that does kitchen renovations, they often have bench top off cuts in various materials that is suitable for jigs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
QUOTE (Dave M @ 24 May 2012, 13:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello from PSC,
All emails and questions have been answered.
I had problems with my account here on slotforum, seems to be good now.
If you have questions please PM me.

300SLR.
Corian from Dupont is a thermoformed material for ease of fabrication.
PSC stopped using Corian over a year ago,the new material is a non thermoformable solid surface material,
and is unaffected by the heat from your soldering iron. The combination of acid flux
and heat for the soldering iron will stain the surface very slightly. Thousands of scratch built
chassis's have been built on this material by hundreds of builders with no warping of the fixture
or cracking between the holes. Our material is the thickest available with two choices.
.800 thick or 1.200 thick.

Thanks Russell Sheldon for your help.

Dave Mountz
dave thanks for all your help,i will be in touch in the next few weeks to order a jig.
martin
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
QUOTE (Dave M @ 24 May 2012, 13:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello from PSC,
All emails and questions have been answered.
I had problems with my account here on slotforum, seems to be good now.
If you have questions please PM me.

300SLR.
Corian from Dupont is a thermoformed material for ease of fabrication.
PSC stopped using Corian over a year ago,the new material is a non thermoformable solid surface material,
and is unaffected by the heat from your soldering iron. The combination of acid flux
and heat for the soldering iron will stain the surface very slightly. Thousands of scratch built
chassis's have been built on this material by hundreds of builders with no warping of the fixture
or cracking between the holes. Our material is the thickest available with two choices.
.800 thick or 1.200 thick.

Thanks Russell Sheldon for your help.

Dave Mountz
dave thanks for all your help,i will be in touch in the next few weeks to order a jig.
martin
 
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