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no1-once a track has been cleaned to 'new' status,using Peko rail track cleaner which i might add is the quickest way to get all the old crap off and the old rust,-what is the best way to stop it re-rusting over??-someone suggested(meccano magazine 1965 to be precise)rubbing a oily cloth just over the rails to stop it reforming....this i have just recently tried on a four lane pitstop 'x' section,but is there any other surefire way of rust eradication?
no2-
+on the subject of classic track,i've been informed that the old 'goodwoods chicane'track sections moulds are damaged,so there is no likelyhood of a 'sport track' goodwoods any time soon

with all the talk of a new sport pitstop i am wondering if scalex will remould old classics like the lemans start ...

rgds to all
 

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...try Nickel-plating - ask for a shop in your region. You've not to clean teh track pieces - and only metal is covered with the Nickel - I'm using thsi method for my garden-railwa-tracks - and it works fine - but is a little expensive.
 

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QUOTE ...but is there any other surefire way of rust eradication?

Of course there is -

Regular and spirited use!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wankel-thats fine,although it still seems to creep back in-i have found though that the lightly oiled cloth method works well,and has the added bonus of the cars going superfast as there is less resistance on the braids(i'd never seen a Lister Jag do a scale speed of 800mph b4!)
The drawback to this however is the braids will from time to time need a wipe with meth spirits to remove any excess oil that has built up,but i clean my braids spasmodically anyway so no real hassle,and care should be taken to wipe ONLY the rails and not the track surface.
Its amazing the amount of dirt that builds up over a seriousely short space of time on the rails,and i would recommend this method to anyone.
 

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re Rail cleaning
I don't know what others think but i use a lint frre cloth lightly doused with WD40 seems to work a treat.

Wayneslot
 

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Hi Everyone,
The comments about track cleaning reminded me of what I discovered
over the past 2 weeks and why I have changed how I clean my track.

A while back, based on a friend's experience and what I read on some web
sites, I decided to start cleaning my track rails with WD-40. Prior to that, I was using rubbing alcohol.

After I switched to the WD-40, I noticed that my braids seemed to get dirtier faster, picking up lots of grime and that I needed to clean the rails more often. I then had to start cleaning the braids as well, something I didn't have to do with rubbing alcohol. I also noticed that my friend uses some type of braid cleaner on his cars.
My impression was that while the WD-40 did indeed clean the track, some sort of residue was left on the rails.

Anyway, I asked one of our chemists here at work about how WD-40
works and he told me that the product is essentially a combination of
kerosene and oil. The kerosene acts as a penetrant and cleaner removing
dirt, rust, grime, etc., but the oil component remains on the surface of
the cleaned item, i.e. the rail. So you now have a metal rail with a thin oil
coating that acts as a magnet for any airborne dust, dirt, etc.

As a result, dirt builds up on the oil coating and then is "transferred" to the braids,
which in turn have oil "trapped" in them. It makes for a vicious circle of
dirt and constant cleaning!

Our chemist's recommendation was to use a fast evaporating,
non-residue cleaner like Electrical Contact Cleaner or other similar type
aerosol solvent. I am now using a CRC Heavy Duty Degreaser product sprayed
on a cloth and wiped on the rails. The dirt comes right off and unlike,
the WD-40 I can't feel any oiliness on the rails. I changed braids on my cars
and there is much less dirt build-up on them now.

I don't like to clean my track any more often than necessary, so
anything that makes it stay cleaner longer works for me! Just thought you
might be interested...

Regards,
Wayne

 

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Has anyone tried 'Plebys track cleaning products'?

It's always on ebay, and I believe they advertise in the NSCC aswell..

It seems to work well, but it is very expensive compared with WD40 etc..
 

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Pretty well all track cleaning methods work fairly well and all have their upsides and downsides. Like most things in life, it's a balancing act between what you gain and what it costs you to gain it and,as usual will come down to personal preference to quite large degree.

The upside of non-oily cleaners is undoubtedly that they don't leave a sticky residue to gunge up the braids - exactly as waydui says. But the upside of a very light oily residue is almost a guarantee of no corrosion. The other downside of oil based cleaners, besides a natural attraction for dust is a tendency to reduce the effectiveness of electrical contact.

It seems to me that the choice is likely to be dictated to a very large degree by the environment in which the track lives. If the atmosphere is humid and cold, then it's probably best to use an oil based cleaner such as WD40, but to wipe up thoroughly afterwards leaving as little residue as possible. This is the method my club uses and it works well on our ten year old SCX track which still shows virtually no sign of corrosion in spite of residing in a typically cool damp UK climate. Muck on the braids is really quite minimal though it does occur. When a dozen guys are racing, we simply wipe our braids with white spirit or similar, and after a surprisingly short time, they stay clean again.

On the other hand - if the track resides in a warm, dry atmosphere, then corrosion can be more or less discounted unless liquid is spilled directly on the track. This includes carbonated drinks and sweat, which are both quite corrosive in their own right!

As a matter of casual comparison, I have had bits of Scalextric track lying all over my house for around four years. In the main living area, which is always at a reasonable temperature and never damp, there is no sign of corrosion whatsoever and this track has never been cleaned with anything, not ever. However, a couple of sections in the bathroom, which is also at a sensible temperature, have spots of deep corrosion which are entirely due to the humidity. It's worth commenting that a section of Carrera track, also in the bathroom, shows not a single sign of any kind of marking - a function of the stainless rails. I believe Artin track uses the same or very similar steel for its rails and this material difference is something that is not often taken great cognizance of. If corrosion could be a problem, then choosing one of these track sytems could eliminate it.
 

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Hi Guys
I use marvel mystery oil in an old oiler and comutator oil one drop each on the braids and place it in the straight section of my track and run a couple of laps. to spread out the oils, and if the cars is a bit slippery just wipe down the track with a dry clean terrycloth rag and no rust! I live at the beach here in So. Cal. and get alot of salty air and if you do not protect metals with some kind of rust inhibitor any metal rusts over night! But not my track!!!


"my two cents worth!"

Marty
 

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Alan Tadd
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Tropi

One has to ask the question.........

Why have you got slot track in your bathroom?

Is it to practice waterspashes, as in WRC?

or is it your equivilent of playing "battleships" in the bath?

I'm sure we all are dying to know.!

Regards

Alan
 

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D'oh! You beat me to it Beejay!

Our Classic track must be close to ten years old now. It has taken nine years of being assembled and disassmebled and spending its down time between weekly meetings stored in firstly; an unheated storage room attached to the outside of a cricket pavillion; and secondly, an unheated but integral cupboard in a community hall.

It had a year out of use, stored in a barn before coming to Oxford and during this time the rust took a gentle hold. To counter this, I took a Plebys to all six lanes but being a slacker by choice I declined to buff it until it shone, merely doing sufficient to get a car to be capable of doing a circuit with out recourse to a big stick. Since then, continuous use has finished the polishing job and kept the nasty red stuff at bay.

Your atmospherics may vary.
 

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On an equally light note, it is common knowledge among some of the more elderly farmers and car restorers of The Sunshine state (Queensland) that a mixture of molasses and water in the ratio of 5 parts water to one part molasses is an ideal rust remover. Although I suggest you dont put it on your braids or rails, it is an ideal track restorer for those bits that have crossed the threshold.
The chemical processes triggered by this concoctiion have been known to shift even the most stubborn of surface rust from Tractors and Model A Fords alike!
The remedy would be to steep the track in this solution for several hours, after which the track is removed and rinsed in clean cold water for a little while, then, the application of a moisture dispersant like Duck oil or WD40 would finish the process. Not only does this clean the surface of the rails but also gets into the joining tags which are a vital but often overlooked part of the whole continuity!

Finally, I have to add that I have never tried this as I am a committed board track racer and I can except no responsibility for damage to part or the whole of track sections due to the use or misapplication of this process!!

I Seen it but I don't believe it!!

BUT,

If any one tries it it would be nice to know if it works!!

Wixwacing
 

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That's a new one on me and I am curious as to how molasses works. A bit of research might be interesting.

My understanding of the 'Coca Cola Process' is that any carbonated drink will do the same job, as it is the carbonic acid that eats the rust and they all contain it - H2CO3 if I remember correctly. Of course, the acid will also eat the metal as well as the rust, but I think it is such a weak acid solution that it's fairly easy to select the right moment to cease treatment at the point the rust has been removed and before it gets a good grip on the metal.
 

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EXCELLENT, Tropi, your most valuable post for 2003, if not ever.

"No dear, I'm not JUST playing toy cars, I'm working on my Ph.D. See, Uni of Queensland."

I just read your post, showed 'she who must be obeyed' the site at the link and it bloody well worked! If I play my cards right, it will lead to more cars for research purposes. I wonder if the guy with the paper got a goverment grant or a tax break?

Arise, Sir Tropi, for services to married slot car racers !!


 

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G'day Monaro,
We are Q32 based in Brisbane! we are racing most makes in 1/32 scale on a variety of tracks. Mostly box standard though. We have guys come from the north and south coast to race once a fortnight. We race on several tracks, varying from craftwood to Ninco and Carrera. All the tracks are 4 lane with electronic race management systems.
Will have our own website in early 2004 so if you want to be on the mailing list for race events, send me your email address and I'll add you to my bulk mailing folder. I'm at [email protected]
In the meantime have a look at this link for some of the tracks we use. Q32
 
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