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Jeeez!

I don't know what to say. Either I was too dumb to cheat or my damn cars were too fast!


Or there was no need because all of you guys were TOO SLOW!


 

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QUOTE Philippe, you tell your stories and I'll tell mine! :cool:

Greg, really, I never even thought of it the whole time I ran pro racing. The car had to pass tech, and they were impounded after, so if they did not fit the Champion tech tool, I would be out. As far as "group" racing, we only had the Group-20 with the horrible Champion soft-steel pile, and I did nothing more than what was allowed. Since I was not a motor builder but an assembler, my G-20 arms were given to me first by Bob Green (MURA) then by Bill Steube (Team Checkpoint). Did they cheat? I remember my cars to be no faster than anyone's in a straight line, but I also remember that from the next corner, I would edge the other guys slightly and build on this lap after lap. I believe that I had a genuinely better setup, better understanding of aero at a time when it was in primary stages, and generally my cars were better built with more understanding of the mechanical necessities and function. Cheating? HOW or WHY?

When I quit pro-racing in the middle of 1973 after two hectic racing years, I returned to motorcycle road racing and bought a pair of Yamaha TZ production racers. These things were so bad and so un-reliable, I just built my own bikes (engines et all!) just like I did with the slot cars, and began winning big, beating the works entries of youngster Randy Mamola or the vastly experioenced and blindingly fast Jody Nicholas! I won the CMC championship in 1975 and the AFM's in 1977 on aggregate points. My bikes were featured in magazines of the period as "not your usual home-built scooters". Just like for the slot cars, I chose the right people (All American Racers...!), the right engineering and tried to do what mechanically made sense. My 125 and 250 were often unbeatable until 1977 when I got a factory ride with the Italian Morbidelli factory, then I did not even have to think, just ride their world-beater to a string of easy wins with incredible mechanical reliability.
Cheating really never entered my mind because I was just trying another method of winning, that of having BETTER machinery than the opposition.
I must say that I did cheat in the following manner: by writing LOTS of well illustrated stories about my slot cars for period magazines, I think that I psyched out my opposition (from Lee Gilbert to John Cukras to Mike Steube to Joel Montague etc.) which never believed anything I wrote. It was THEIR loss as I correctly represented everything as I saw it, and from the results on the track, they would have been better inspired to read it again... I also had a serious edge in controller technology with my one-offs "Ice Box" controllers, later sold to Parma as the basis for their Turbo line that laster until today.
My private paying customers did like my cars very much and I kept some of the testimonial letters received from them, some of them very funny. I sold a complete RTR car once to Bernd Mobus (now prez of Kyosho in Germany) and he promptly won the 1974 European championship with it. No cheating there either.
Regards,

Dr. Pea
 

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QUOTE In my fading memory, wasn't there a ridged and inversely tapered guide flag commercially available at some point, the rationale being exactly as you describe, Cheater?

T-guides were made by AMR for their rental cars and only worked on their tracks. You put one on a Pro Car and you are in the wall real quick because these guides were junk and their design awful.
In the early 1970's , Associated produced a ribbed guide called "Steube" for more retention inside the slot. It worked OK but I personally improved on it: My own pro cars had a standard "Jet" flag, cut with a Dremel disk into 6 small sections about 1/8" tall from the guide's bottom, and then sprayed lightly to each side. The purpose: having the BOTTOM of the guide riding the BOTTOM of the slot. Then I would boil them in hot water with a color die (green) for strenght. The new TSRF metal pin guide has a taper for the same reason. How is this cheating and not standard prep when the slot is straight up, and even if it was not? "Use you brain, Luke..."
Regards,

Dr. Pea
 

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QUOTE Looking forward to meeting you in Vegas next week. Philippe said he's buying all the beer all weekend. Right, Philippe? :cool:

Yes it's true, but you have to pay for the girls. That's the deal.
 
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