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QUOTE (slot32 @ 2 Aug 2011, 23:20) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>If power to the track and controllers is cut I assume that the braking effect is zero. Sometimes at the club we cut the power to the track/controllers if there is a problem and then the cars run on on their own so whatever the controller there is not braking or is there if there is a capacitor effect in the controller? I assume you do not want any braking in a power cut as you would want the car to travel it's max distance!
If power to the track and controllers is cut, full braking is available with simple brake contacts, simple resistor adjustment and some types of electronic brake adjustment.
If power to the track and controllers is cut, no braking is available with some types of controller with FET type electronic brakes.

By available I mean you get brakes if the controller trigger / plunger is in the brake position, otherwise you don't.
That is what you want.
If no brakes are available, when the power is turned off any cars that near the end of straights crash into the next corner. (The crashing does happen with some types of controller with FET type electronic brakes.)
 

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Turing off power at the end of a race is standard where races are run for a fixed length of time.
It was done that way because the result depends on measuring the stopping point.
Also it's needed for segmented racing to give the starting place on the next lane (segmented racing is normal at so many top level meetings these days).
These days there are several of computerised race management systems that can estimate the finishing position, although that's not practical in segmented racing. Even in single lane racing there are anomalies like what happens when a car deslots or is overtaken on the last lap.

Some controllers with FET type electronic brakes do continue to work after the power is turned off. I don't know why the others don't do it that way.
 
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