SlotForum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a record for me - I bought this last December and it's now restored. Stuff like this typically takes me several years before it starts, let alone finishes. Here it is as advertised for sale. A matt black Chaparral, why not?

1.jpg

2.jpg

As ever, I was hopelessly optimistic about the work needed. This started emerging after the strip-down and paint stripping. Biggest obvious problem was the glasswork - two big windows missing and the rest messed up by the usual liberal application of polystyrene cement in the 60s.

3.jpg

The stripped body revealed quite a lot of melt-damage, again from the floods of polystyrene cement. This typically leaves depressions in the body surface and you can also get stress fractures when dismantling the body - I got lots of both - every bit covered by grey filler below:

4.jpg

Still, the chassis was in nice shape, just needed dismantling, cleaning up the magnesium bits with steel wool then a light varnish spray, plus a general clean-up of the other bits and careful reassembly. You can see the result above - I think it came out with a nice antique retro feel to it but maybe that's just me!

OK, onto the glasswork and here's where the trouble started in earnest. I'd been here before of course on other cars so I knew the plan, chisel away at the fogged bits until you get to uncrazed plastic then sand smooth using progressively finer paper then polish to a perfect finish. This failed dismally with the windscreen, which was melted all the way through. Had to bite the bullet and make a new one. As the old screen was a write-off I used it to make a mould using Chemical Metal (a very fine, very strong type of body filler). Cox 2D afficianados will know that the windscreen fits butt-ended to the cockpit (no overhangs) but this wasn't going to work with a vac-formed screen so I build in an underhang into the mould (you can see this as a band of cream modelling clay.

5.jpg

After pouring the goop in (used a bit of grease to make sure everything would come apart after) and letting it set I had a crude windscreen mould. Lots of sanding down later . . . .

6.jpg

7.jpg

For almost all the rest of the glassware I decided to hunt through the Coides box of vac-formed blobs rescued from packaging. This was because all these items are simple shapes for the Cox 2D, with no complex curves in multiple directions - apart from the headlight covers (see later). I found reasonable likenesses for both sets of side screens and the rear engine cover. Here they are, together with their cruddy real equivalents.

8.jpg

Now those headlight covers (also shown above). They are a very complex shape and I could have gone the same route as for the windscreen but decided to give the clean-up a try too. Here are the three stages - before, gouge & sand, polish.

9.jpg

Not perfect but pretty good:

10.jpg

The sidescreens had their own problems. In the 60s, while the original polystyrene windows fitted OK, any glue was horribly obvious and ruined the joint by melting the plastic. Replacing these by vac-form fifty years later makes it virtually impossible to fit them neatly. For the big sidescreens I solved this by making my own mountings thus:

11.jpg

The white sheet in the middle is thin polystyrene sheet which bends nicely and can be glued in at the back. All you need to do then is trim out the middle to leave a narrow edge that the screen can sit on. For the rear sidescreens this was too fiddly for me so I just stuck in my new vacforms . . . and it looked a real mess! I eventually resorted to making a decal to simulate the edging with its rivets - not perfect but OK without a magnifying glass!

12.jpg

The rest of the build was pretty much straight-forward. Here's the outcome:

13.jpg

15.jpg

17.jpg

16.jpg

Now I have three Chaparral 2D in three different scales - and I love them all!

18.jpg

Andy

Andy's Builds

1967 1/24 Cox Lola T70

1/24 Cox Lotus 40

Porsche 917LH 1971

Porsche 917LH 'Psychedelic'

1970 Alfa 33 1968-1971

Alfa 33/2 Nurburgring

Alfa 33/3 1970 Monza 1000km

Alfa 33/2 Spyder, 1970 Targa Florio

Alfa 33/3 1969

1967 Porsche 907 BOAC 500

1967 Porsche 910 BOAC 500

Porsche 907LH Daytona 1968

Ford GT Roadster, 1965 Targa Florio

Two Ferrari 312Ps

A "Revell" Aston Martin DP214

Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato, Le Mans 1963

Revell AC Cobra, Le Mans 1963

1967 Lola T70 Mk3 GT

1931 Mercedes SSKL

Two 1960s Monogram F1s

Chaparral 2F BOAC 500 1967

Chaparral 2D Le Mans 1966

Talbot T26, Le Mans 1953

Mercedes 300SL
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
Well done Andy , Awesome ! And thanks for adding rebuild tips ! I will definitely try some of your methods . Zig
 

·
re member
Joined
·
4,096 Posts
Love it, very nice work, especially the clear parts.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
An excellent restoration and great work in progress pictures. I dread to think how many hours you spent on the car...

David
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
939 Posts
Really enjoyed seeing above how it evolved, Andy.

At Bordeaux recently I took an easier route. A Cox Chaparral 2 won in an after dinner auction at a very reasonable cost I saw was missing just one headlamp cover. Brad Blohm of Professor Motor was there to race and sell stuff; he does replacement clear plastic parts for these models. Sorted!

Richard
 

·
Pete Shepherd
Joined
·
1,694 Posts
Great work as usual Andy, some very useful techniques shown here, thanks very much for sharing.

Pete

PS, I have a Monogram Ferrari 250LM from the same seller which was painted in the same horrible grey! I've got as far as stripping the paint fortunately my body faired better than yours and doesn't have any melt marks from the glue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,363 Posts
A veritable master class in making your own glassware!
thumbsup.gif


And I love the pukka elastic band to keep the guide straight, very much of the period.

I vividly recall inverting numerous Cox GT40s and Chap 2Ds when marshalling cars that just WOULDN'T go back in the slot, only to find they'd omitted to fit the dreaded elastic band!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I dread to think how many hours you spent on the car...
This was a middling one David - all over in a few weeks, part time.

I vividly recall inverting numerous Cox GT40s and Chap 2Ds when marshalling cars that just WOULDN'T go back in the slot, only to find they'd omitted to fit the dreaded elastic band!
Ah yes, the elastic band. Eventually found a shortish one with the correct square cross-section - but it was too long. Had to cut a bit out then tie it together (using a bit of knot know-how inherited from 60s boys comics!). The knot's hiding behind the metal plate.

The really weird thing is that the rubber band somehow has transmitted a bit of extra drop-down to the drop guide, a bit like the Monogram brass chassis. This may actually help on our club track because it's bumpy. I wonder if Cox actually planned for this?

Andy
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top