Slot Cars Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am sorting out some of my 1/24th scale cars for a race meeting at The Southend Slot Racing Club later in the year.

I am currently working on my Lotus 40 and need to clean up the oxidised magnesium wheels. Has anyone a suggestion of the best method for doing this please.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,174 Posts
dear David , I give you the mail address of my friend Jean Michel , well known french Cox enthusiast , by private message .
He 'll give you hints and tips for this particular job and his english is much better than mine . Best regards .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
686 Posts
Calling Phillippe!! Everyone will say lemon juice, but Mr TSRF has definite opinions on how to do it the correct way.
 

·
Gerald Lambourn
Joined
·
998 Posts
Just to clarify the chemistry the acid in citrus fruits is citric acid which is less active than acetic, there are other organic acids used for cleaning kettles and scale removal. At the Hobby Show over the weekend I saw some small sand blasting guns, a bit like an airbrush, worth looking into.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the advice and thanks Eddie for the link, as there is vinegar immediately to hand I'll go with that option.

Thanks
David
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,640 Posts
David,

When I use vinegar, I dilute it, and keep on eye on the process - it can eat up the wheel as well as the oxidation if left in too long! I have found vinegar to be more effective than lemon juice.

The best option is probably bead-blasting, but you need a friend with the appropriate machine... anyway, I've done a lot of wheels, etc. with the vinegar method and it works well. After cleaning, you should probably use some kind of varnish to keep it from oxydizing again, but not sure what people use.

Don
 

·
Senior Slot Car Mechanic
Joined
·
2,230 Posts
Best method for cleaning Cox wheels is blasting with Baking Soda. Takes away the oxide, and, leaves the metal basically untouched. Not nearly as aggressive as Bead Blasting, which puts too coarse a finish on Magnesium, which, is very soft.

Best thing is, you can do it with an ordinary Airbrush, no big or exotic equipment required.

This method also works great for cleaning crudded up old brass chassis.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the extra info about diluting the vinegar Don and the baking soda suggestion Al. I got diverted today making up the screens for a Lotus Elite but I will tackle the Cox wheels tomorrow and see how it goes.

Thanks
David
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,887 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just to finish off this thread I can report that I put the wheels in a 35mm film canister lid with vinegar for 5 minutes and then scrubbed them with an old toothbrush and they came up nice and clean, they aren't brand new looking but this car is a racer so I didn't want it to look too squeaky clean.

Thanks for the help
David
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,640 Posts
If you add three parts of olive oil and a little mustard, you also get a mean vinaigrette that you can use on the evening salad ...

(sorry, I get that one out every few years, like to be faithful to my traditions)
Don
 

·
Tony Condon
Joined
·
3,044 Posts
hi eddie
dont know about french dressing ,but HP sauce certainly does the biz ,I know cos i,ve tried it
good on bacon butties too , but not after you,ve coated the wheels with it

cheers tony
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top