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I've got about 10 thousand slot car pix in my photobucket; that document the last ten years of the modeling, restoration, and customization jag I've been on. I used to do a weekly schtick. Now-a-days I just post as I get time. We'll save the restoration side of things for another day/thread. I only choose cars that are broken or totaled for customization. The filler base is made in bulk from original scrap cars. "model murdering" is the ongoing story of working on Aurora HO cars with color matched liquid plastic, and a lot of other crazy things that happen along the way. We're just going to pick it up on a new Willys project I started a few weeks back, and fill in all the miscellaneous details as we get rolling.


Over the years, I had built some house runners for the grandkids and guests as time permits. They like the Aurora 41 Willys, and so does grandpa. The Willys is a great door banger, that can be made to handle reliably. With yellow, green, red versions completed, I needed a fourth. I like each model to be different, so for starters I adapted some Tyco TCR front wheels and stub axles to a modified T-jet chassis (We'll save the rear drop axle modification for another day too). Along with the drop axle mod, I used a 6 ohm green/green armature, a pair of Super Two magnets, Wizzard brushes, and some BSRT shoes. A beat up blue model was chosen from the bone yard. After a good scrubbing I repaired the front and rear screw posts. As you can see, the wheel wells were savagely violated as was the custom.


Once I can get a chassis mounted, I can get started on some fender repair. With no collector value to lose, and little to no point in restoring a common model; I chose mischief. I used to work pretty hard at flares, now we have the abridged version. Using junker Tyco 440 tires of the rubber sort as a form, I've been free forming my flares for a few years now. Here's the first pass of high solids filler. At this point your just building a base for the layers to follow ....

A "BRIGHT" BLUE WILLYS



After the first round of filler set up and shrunk back, I move the tires out a bit, and then add a second pass of high solids base to blend the transition between the parent and the flare. The inside edge near the body requires some viscosity adjustment. You dont want to create a hard edge that is difficult to sand near the body. A 50/50 premix of base and Testors 3502 bridges the base to the parent. A 3502 wash feathers it all to the parent and leaves no hard edge. The viscosity increases as the wash, premix, and the high solids fall away from the body. It requires a light touch with the brush. No need for delicacy on the outside edge! Right after the application, I hang the model upside down until the repair flashes off and sets the solids. Then I flip it back over and let the filler slough over the edge. The excess drooling over is no big deal. It actually speeds up the edge build.


After a coupla days, the excess is cut away with a used hobby blade. A freshie might shear in wildly or dive off course. Along with a more controllable blade the hardened old rubber Tyco tires tend to buck the blade, and keep you cutting on the outside of the plumb line where you're supposed to be. Most any mistake is fixable, and I tend to be pretty cavalier with the blade; but I always tip toe the important cuts.


The roof wasnt sprung down and holding any unusual preload from being lightly stomped. I carefully flame tickled the cracked and bent A-pillar. Once warmed the roof torsion pulled it back straight. sometimes ya get lucky. Again, high solids were added to the open crack at the base of the pillar. Premix was blended on, then pulled up and over the drip rail; and feathered down with 3502. The later Aurora Willys are bit short/low where the Driver A-pillar meets the leading edge of the roof. The driver's drip rail detail is often muddied. I always added a skim or two to flesh out the shortfall, to give me enough to work with later.



The exaggerated wide set Tyco tires are exchanged for the chosen silis. By design, this automatically provides some clearance. The arches get their first undercut using my sanding pencil.



After the first pass a coupla weeks ago, I wasnt happy with the color match. I ended up switching from my T-jet dark blue base to a Vibrator bright blue base. The off angle 3/4 rear view indicates the color match is back on track.


There still quite a bit of work to go. After the recent session sets up, the hood needs some attention before moving on to the finish stage.






The Willys wheel well project needs several days to gas off residual 3502. When free sculpting with base and premix, the cure time must be extended. At the end of a session, I frequently check back to other projects when the plastic is flowing good. (read: when I'm flowing good). A sneak peak at Black Beauty. A quick cut back with 600, and a complete re-float of the rear door and the quarters. A thicker premix goes on the sides to flesh things out, and a medium wash along upper side molding in order to maintain the factory transition/step as styled. I'm debating whether to model the rear fender skirt or not. Unlike the Willys, where the premix serves to blend a transition between the parent and the filler base; the premix is omitted so that there IS a pronounced transition. Based on the obligatory picture study I do, the modern rendition is lowered considerably and loses the fender skirt. After this stage cures a bit, I'll get the rear doors scribed in and rocker detail extended.

 

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Always enjoy reading some model murdering. The photos as the car transitions from horror show to show room beauty are always very detailed and are needed so you can see it really is the same car! Nice to have you here Bill.
 

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QUOTE (abie321 @ 7 Apr 2016, 11:23) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Great looking builds!!!

The biggest issue I have had against HO is stance and wheel size - that one looks really great.


When you say the stance, could you expand on what you mean by that? Not always up on my terms especially having just got over the flu!

I'd say HO like all the scales is a mixed bag. Some of the production cars were total blobs and look very wrong. And others look very right. Bill's work is reminiscent of a watchmaker at work. Some very fine detail indeed.
 

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Great work and a very interesting "how to", thanks for posting it.

When I have repaired areas of a bodyshell I have mixed very small scraps of styrene into liquid poly and applied it as a paste. What type of liquid plastic are you using please?

David
 

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Thanks for rolling out the Welcome mat and all the kind words guys!

Yeah Al, I guess my name would be important after all. Fortunately Gareth has my back. We've corresponded for a coupla years now so you can blame him for my presence here.

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David: Making "Goop" is easier than falling down. The application takes PPP. Practice-Patience and Persistence. I snip up clean scrap cars using ***** into 1/8"-1/4" chunks, the size isnt all that important. Small enough that it can get in the mouth of a Testors 3502 bottle and have the chips settle somewhat uniformly in the bottom of the jar. The chips are just barely covered with the 3502 (solvent). Walk away! 24 hrs later you'll have a sticky colloid about the consistency of mayonnaise. Adjusting the viscosity of the base with 3502 allows one to exploit the material's tendencies for application. I use common artist brushes around 00 or 000 for application, colorblending, and to tease it around in general. Working from a bottle of base, I used to count drops to keep track of the dilution ratio; but with time served, you can tell where your at simply by color and consistency. "Base" is roughly 1:1. "Premix" is somewhere between 2:1 and 4:1 depending on what consistency is required. "Wash" (primer) is over 4:1. "Sprayable" is around 5 or 6:1 and produces a show car shine. It can go higher depending on the color. Ordinarily, color sanding with 600 and 1200, then buffing; produces the correct factory finish.

It should be noted that this particular Willys project uses the free form sculpting technique. Schlobber on and start whittling. Transplanting hard stock donor grafts and sectioning whole panels provide a way to execute precision repairs. Properly done the repairs are indistinguishable from the original, depending on what kind of day we're having - LOL!

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Abie: Stance is ALWAYS my first consideration. A carry over from a career spent doing the same thing to 1:1 cars. Save for Racemasters, Compared to the ROW large scale manufacturers, the H0 manufacturers have been phoning it in for years. If it doesnt look right or sit right, it aint right ....period. I'm not a rivet counter, in fact quite the opposite. I've been a fugitive from the Livery Police since the golden age. I just try to pick/find the complimentary line, angle, or curve; and keep it simple. If I cant find the look, I just set them aside until such time a I do; which is not to say that I dont push a bit on occasion.

For example, I already know that just finishing the Black Beauty wont be enough to satisfy. Like so many, Aurora's Imperial sits herdy gerdy, and handles like it! It was broken clean in half so I couldnt get a good look at it. Now that the core model is structurally stabilized and approaching the finish stages; there WILL be some adjustments. Ordinarily I try to get the stance/line sorted out early.


This very early XKE roadster project is filled with lots of tricks to get it to sit right and wrap the body around the chassis. Conversely, it was all planned from the get go. All the body work was done in the original bright Olive plastic. When judgement day finally came, I couldnt bring myself to cut and rub it as Olive. The stance (personality) screamed for something less mundane. Thats an overspray using T-jet standard Green. I just wing it for the most part.

Thanks for playing along guys!

 

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*** Leo A Capaldi ***
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Great stuff M-M,
I read the title then started to read the topic and then when I saw the picture with the scalpel blade I was reminded that the car is HO size !! Nice work, the body is nicely detailed, so well worth restoring properly.

Leo
 

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Alan Paterson
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Nice one Bill, I experimented with arb plastic "chips" and Thinners, or nail varnish, but never got it to work properly. I might need to give this a go again, however the Smoothon Im using now kind of does the same thing, except it's a little more running, until it starts to cure..

Nonetheless, great tutorial there. I'm sure a bunch of people can benefit from that technique..

regards

Al
 

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Thanks MM for your reply regarding "goop" or "high solids" - the terms you used threw me but in fact you make it in the same way that I do, thanks for the clarification.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Big Al: "Cool, don't think thats available down south on the Planet tho.. ;-)"

No worries Al, I imagine one could get equal results with whatever plastic welder solvent is available to you. Additionally, we have a guy at the Slot Lodge, "Slider", who has made great strides in formulating his own at substantial savings. Definitely worth a look!

David: "Thanks MM for your reply regarding "goop" or "high solids" - the terms you used threw me but in fact you make it in the same way that I do, thanks for the clarification."

Yes, cooking it chemically is really the only way for the average Joe to do it, but the trade off is that unlike catalyzed fillers, it requires the extended cure time; which can be off putting for patience challenged modelers. The beauty is that, it lends itself readily to color-blending on the work piece; so that your color-matches are spot on. Personally, I also love the fact that because it IS the same material; the parent and the donor cut, file, and sand at the same rate.

I spent a lot of years in a high end chop shop. Adding some actual autobody techniques and terminology; then combining it with my horendous shop slang doesnt translate very well, even in our own language LOLOLOL. Sorry, we'll work through the dialect and idiom issues together! I'm always happy to compare notes.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·


THE CHAPPASAURUS

One of our regulars at the Slotlodge, Rob aka "Chappy", is a talented machinist. Shown below is a T-jet interchange, brass chassis; that uses the Tyco Pro box motor.




Im a fusser of ride heights. Generally I just drill new axle locations where I want them. I couldnt bring myself to butcher Robs beautiful work. Rather than re-drilling the bores to raise the axle centers, I set the model aside to think about it. I came back to it sometime later and lo and behold the Shoemaker's Elves had dropped by and lowered the chassis for me. D'oh! (I had inadvertently set the chassis upside down and presto!)

The disclaimer being that motor saddles had to be raised/lowered, depending on your perspective.


Over the years, discussion about ugly ducklings pops up from time to time. The 2D Spyder has been on my list of "to dos" for years. I chose a Chappy to commemorate Chappy's chassis. With hacked wheel wells, both the screw posts missing and holed through the body, and all the necessary bits had gone awol; There was nowhere but up ... and out.


The first pass on the fenders always goes on a bit fugly. I dont sweat it.


After a cut backs in 220 and 320 grit, the second pass is more representative of what you want to see. You can see where filler is still a bit thin, out toward the lip. The tire shines through.




Substantial lowering took the missing front screw post out of the equation; so I dispensed with replacing the front screw post altogether, and opted for a tongue and groove arrangement. The chassis just slides in neatly, and the rear screw keeps things together nicely.






Due to the low slung mid engine layout, There werent too many pick up options. Rather than a drop arm, a "drop plate" was used. The above pix show the over and under of how it worked out.




After all the mayhem, the original styling now appeared short up front. I frenched in an Aurora Mako Shark chin spoiler under the front end, to pull the styling together.


Although I've been working in red and the match is good, I havent picked a color yet. An absolute joy to drive. Low slung, mid engine balance, makes for great handling. Using a Tyco 440 armature and magnets in the old Tyco pro box provides plenty of grunt.


Much still up in the air. Although it would be a bit "Dino-esque", I havent ruled out a Leman's version. (Using the Mako shark roof as a base.)

Thanks for riding along!

 
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