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Discussion Starter · #201 ·
Incredible work on that Lotus! Wow. That's art right there.

What mini motor is that? How does it run?
Thank you!


It was really a two stage build. I'm pretty quick with the brass work once I have my mind made up. The fussy body work always drags on into what seems like dog years

I wish I knew the motor re-order number. The darn things often have no identifying marks. During that period I tested and tinkered with a lot of them. I do know they are a rarely seen 9 ohm poly mag with copper metallic brushes, they run well on 18v, provided they have the drive train and chassis load. I accidentally grenaded an unloaded one during testing, so I had a test subject.

Due to the much lower CG, added width, and mass, the track manners are quite good; but you have to watch the understeer, which is sort of counterintuitive for it's weight and feel. When the time comes to replace the braids, I'll tinker the guide forward for a bit more over steer, and forgiveness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #202 · (Edited)
Rather than lose this in "Dummies for Guide for Airbrushing", I'll stash some more advanced theory here for now.

Giggle, define "ready to spray" ... a subject that came up this week in another thread. Here's more than most want to know, but find out that they may need to know after all.

Most people arent ready. I most surely wasnt, but I've been at it a while now. We endlessly dance around viscosity and pressure when it comes to the air brush. It's is the part you have to learn by doing. The same things that make a bomb can useful, but also limiting. Freedom from factory control can be intimidating for beginners when letting go of the "la bomba". For every mistake there is a correction. I'm talking DA here, because the DA put's it all together with respect to control. The trade off is that the control comes a few simple rules. Information often forgotten or never entered into the "instructions" in the first place.

Typically the number one mistake with the AB is mistakenly cranking up the air pressure, when there is trouble. Just because it is rated at 60 or 80 psi, doesnt mean that is the optimum operational range.

1. No amount of pressure will atomize overly viscous material into suitable liquid droplets, so that they can adequately form a uniform liquid film on the intended target. One has insufficient liquid in the fluid blend.

Consider that the blend point is just inside the nose cone where the nozzle(s) meet. A series/ring of air jets surround a single liquid nozzle. That defines "external mix". If the liquid is too thick, the air pressure cant create sufficient siphon to move the overly viscous fluid mixture; when the fluid lever pulls the needle back and opens the fluid nozzle. As though one had jello in a trigger spay bottle.

It'll look splasttery or thickly pebbled in appearance, but not to be confused with an overly extended shooting distance; where what would be adequate liquid is partially dried before it gets to the target. More dusty, but uniform in appearance.

Easy to confuse the two, but they are not the same.

2. The correction is to dump the load into your mixing cup, flush the brush, and incrementally add the appropriate thinner for the material. Visually your looking for consistency around skim milk. I typically strain all materials through a 200 mesh screen for the obvious reason, AND to check if the fluid mix flows through with ease. Ultimately the mix wont be able to move through the nozzle when prompted by the air stream. Thats a viscosity problem of the first order.

3. Too wet? Maybe. Over-thinned does happen. Characterized by the pigment flying outward on the work piece from the nozzle center and outward. One puff will appear like a 60's hippy flower with drooping petals.

a. Now turn the pressure down. If the spray pattern returns to normal the pressure was too high for the thinner viscosity. Where in #1 we had too much viscosity, here we have to much pressure over-atomizing the fluid. The result is an non-uniform liquid film. In this case assaulted by excessive pressure. You can always add paint/toner as a correction, if it isnt suitable for the use immediately at hand.

4. Pressure? With the DA, you push down on the fluid lever to create the air flow across the nozzle. I seldom run over 20 psi. 25 psi for heavier chunkier metallics. Some take a bit more pressure to move them. I may be as low as 6 -12 psi if Im sneaking around. An AB should hiss like a snake ssssssss, not PUHSHTTTTTTTTTT like a bomb can! So how does one know? See below.

5. The test shot basics. Dont wanna do one? Then dont blame the AB. I use any old hard surface thats clean. White or grey is nice, because it's easy to see the action/results. Although the DA has variable metering, you need to be able to adjust/waggle between 4 positions and hold them, in order to have basic proficiency.

a. At 15 psi, push the lever down to enable the air; then ease the fluid lever back (just open) you should be able to count the droplets. At 1/4 lever you should see light even coverage. At 1/2 lever, the fluid delivery should be sufficiently concentrated for a liquid film/sheen. At full lever (nozzle fully open), the delivered mix will flood and run if you dont stroke.

b. If at 15 psi there are no drops appearing with the lever just cracked open, you are too thick. When the fluid lever is fully engaged lever, and the fluid floods or runs off when you stroke, you are too thin. Most problems are obvious to see. The corrections become obvious after you get a few reps under your belt. What used to upset your apple cart, becomes rote soon enough. Always flush the brush first, and then make your correction(s).

c. Notably, the air pressure remains constant. We add fluid NOT air. The material's consistency delivered at the target is dryer or wetter, based on your lever position. Cut-in the work piece at 1/4 to 1/2 lever depending on size. Liquid coats to finish between 1/2 and full lever. Pressure is simply a method of transport. Whether or not the atomized micro droplets have a smooth or bumpy ride is up to you. A smooth ride results in a uniform liquid film. This is not an absolute. A bumpy drier ride is an exploitable effect that can be used.

6. Frequently forgotten are all the gol darned widgets that one finds they need. Ya gotta be a Boy Scout, prepared. I keep a cat whisker in my kit, LOL! It's taped to a small bit of dowel. For quickly extracting the occasional mustache hair or eye brow hair from an otherwise perfect film.

Extra O-rings for the AB. When it happens you'll know! Disposable gloves. Graduated specimen cups for mixing are indispensable. A suitable instrument to use as a pipette for pouring liquids. Empty bottles at the ready for storage of blends of bulk paint. Roll towels, there will be spills. Cleaning brushes for service after spraying. Cleaning solvent if needed. Spend the extra coin for a nice cloth hose of good length! Just because you can get away with filling up an inner tube for an air storage doesnt mean you should.

**

So much more than a fancy bomb can, the critical part, and most often overlooked aspect is the bottom end of the DA's range. It marks the exact point in time where I finally had the light bulb came on (albeit 20 watts). For this reason, I always encourage new users to find/start at the bottom of an AB's operational range. Learning to minimize the viscosity enables the user to work at minimum pressures. What the tool was actually designed for. The end result is absolute control with pinpoint accuracy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #203 ·
Tyco Day


I piece together Tyco-pros as I find the bits and pieces. Im not that hung up on originality, so I ditch the foils. This TP-1 (drop arm) version runs fast and quiet on braids all the way up to 24 volts. Because of the drop arm travel they arent as sensitive to front tire sizing.


Need a wing, a head, and a decal set to finish this one. The gooseneck versions will get braided too.


Here's a 440 project I've been massaging. Conversion to AFX Ansens, along with a fully independent front end.


I built this today. A neo magnet N 30 mini-motor in a light wieght concept using just the 440 frame. 4 or 5 years back, I gathered up the parts, but ended up pushing this project aside for whatever reason.


The stock rear bulkhead is removed and a new brass carrier and adapter plate were fabbed; then installed more rearward for traction. Uses a reverse pinion and a shaved crown.


No traction magnets, no weights. Good balance and track manners; fast, smooth and quiet at 18v. I havent picked a body out yet. hmmmmm ... ?
 

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I've been reading your posts for a while now. Thanks for all the inspiration, Bill. Your fabrication skills are amazing.
I got inspired to go for my first repaint. An HP2 Porsche that I had murdered out all black as a teenager. It could have done with some pillar repair work first but eh, it is what it is. I will build on those skills later.
GM Bahama Blue Metallic BGM0533

Did you decide on a body for your latest 440 chassis build yet?

 

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I'm never in a hurry, but I do push hard when things are working. I even managed to save the weird factory flaw on the driver A pillar


Turns out the crusty T-Bird hood was just big enough (length and thickness) to pull off some rear fender grafts.


What ya dont see are a coupla hundred little daubs t of filler that occur between bonding the major sections and grafts. They add up quickly, IF ya stay after it.


The models are pretty small. Over the years, I've learned to work the filler from both sides. This way you get a full thickness fusion through the cross section of the bond area. All you have to do is turn the model over and float it in while the top application is still hot/active. A little fugly yet, the underside needs a thorough sanding and brush out.



Somehow I came up with a spare Faller wheel. Coincidentally almost identical to the factory offering of the time, with a little wash for contrast





This mashed Mako has been lurking here for ages. I kinda avoid working in white because it's hard to keep your work inclusion free. Little bits of this n that that disappear in the standard colors, pop right out. I only work in white white when things are flowing well and I have a few hours under my belt.


The glass was a glue wad that included the bottom side of the cowl !!! Where in the hell did they think it was going? I worked the roof and cowl clear of acrylic trash, sanded, recoated in standard white. A little 1200 behind the index pegs should do it.


Mako pillars are often bent or broken. All prep and very little goop. Four small daubs and a little feather work is all it really takes. The trick is to drop the bottom of the graft all the way to the base molding/seam, and get a good angle cut on the top.
What is the goop you are referring to? I successfully repaired some bodies but I'm grade school compared to your PhD level work.

To repair wells and pillars, I inside glued thin 1/2mm Evergreen polystyrene sheet with very thin brush on glue from Hobby Lobby (Mr Cement Deluxe). I'm happy with that technique.

For bigger fills, I use JBKwik or use Testors Contour Putty but neither seems to fully fit the bill. So hopefully your goop is better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #207 · (Edited)
Thanx for stopping buy guys!

If I've understood correctly, "goop" is chopped up body wreckage dissolved in a solvent so that the filler is the same material as the work piece.
No decision on a body for the gravity 440, yet!

Yessir, in a nut shell thats it. It's actually long and involved to produce undetectable, color matched, restoration work. It isnt a catalyzed product, so the extended cure window and inevitable shrinkage is off putting for folks in a big hurry. You cant force it to take tooling, it has to be dry. Rather than whittling a single lump of filler down; various viscosities are applied in layers, until the repair surface matches the parent. Wet sanding and polishing are a given.

The unique benefit is a full fusion of parent and donor, rather than a topical bond.

CB: I never use the inert fillers that dont fuse to the workpiece. I just use goop as filler for models that will be painted conventionally, as I have most of the Aurora pallete on hand. Secondly, I'm a proponent of working in similar materials. Dissimilar materials is where the problems begin. Ideally you want the parent and the repair to cut, file, and sand at the same rate. Too hard and you kite off, too soft and you dive in.
 

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Wheel Tire Land vehicle Car Vehicle

I noticed this as well: "Too hard and you kite off, too soft and you dive in."

In the image upon such magnification, you can see where the so-so bond between jbkwik and the body make a line. I don't see it when I hold it. I still enjoy my repair (progress over perfection) since the prior state was so badly scarred. Too me it looks like a car with butt welded in rear quarters due to rust repair from salted winter roads. So I'm strangely fond of the repair for that reason. (Reminds me of the numerous shade tree auto body work that was common when I was a kid. Nowadays, I don't see rusted cars or welded repairs anymore. )
Luckily behind the jbweld "Bondo" there is solid polystyrene lap welded in for a solid substructure.

Unfortunately for my GT40 I didn't have red polystyrene donor but I have tons of white to make goop. So for the next body to be repaired, I'll give your technique a try.

Thank you for the advice.
 

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your repair dont look bad , i like it. i have several aurora cut tjet and vibrator cars in the process of color match goop repairs . some look great now some ok .
but the cool thing is that they are no longer junkers anymore thanks to the goop repairs.😁👍👍👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #210 ·
510 Wagon



After a long hiatus from the slot cave, the monsoons drove me inside. I broke the shop rule and took a consignment from a club member. Not something I'd ordinarily do, but it has it's intrigue. AFX? Always thin and delicate as molded. All the cuts are razor scribed by hand. The fitment is hand filed, so very little filler is used.

While it might seem far fetched on the surface, this seemed like a good warm up for an AFX 57 hardtop from mashing their 55 Post and 57 Nomad together.




The hatch was scribed out an moved back first. Clamped to match the front height, once hardened up, the additional roof section was added easily.




The donor was a bit light, but the owner intends to paint this project in the end; so I didnt chase the color match. Rather than subjecting a thin model to a lengthy chemical strip, the tampos were buffed off after the roof was rough buffed. This way a minimum amount of chem strip is used for the embedded remains, and I get an early look at how the paint will lay down in the graft zone.
 

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MM--Absolutely stunning as usual.

As that is a customer car, time constraints come into play I am sure.

But as you say...good practice, so... for the sake of discussion does that look like it needs the front of the roof dropped a tick and/or both ends to you?

Easy for me to say, difficult to do, close to impossible for me to do. Don't get me wrong, it looks great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #215 · (Edited)
Thanx for riding along guys. Yer all very kind!

Change the #46 to a convertible as well? :)
Dunno CB, I was careful with the donor, and gave it a glance right after harvesting the roof section. We see a convertible, a Targa, maybe a Baja ... naaaaw !

The secret plan has always been a Sugar Daddy version.


... for the sake of discussion does that look like it needs the front of the roof dropped a tick and/or both ends to you? ...
Aurora took some liberties, it's too wide, the chassis is deeply channeled, so we're already starting out a bit Disneyesque (the Movie Cars). If we pull back and honestly look at the entire AFX line, we see that it is "stylized" in an slightly aggressive, but very appealing manner; all of which proved to be extremely successful. More than one mans opinion. We didnt see a push back towards scale realism and accuracy until the striking G-plus line.

You'll note that when I go off the menu, my style is to work by subtraction; but when I have to stay on the menu, I try to color within the lines (a problem I had in second grade). I often ask, "at what point do I quit creating more problems, and just work with what is there. Twiddling the X line in roof work is no great shakes. Toss in the Y and Z lines, and the glass gets tricky by default. o_O
 

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Bill that thing is too cool , that's something i do a bunch of making ho slot car wagons out of non wagons ,
i did the AW thunderbolt 64 fairlane into a 2dr wagon i used a aurora Ferrari roof to extend the roof.
i did a aurora Riviera 2 dr wagon i used a camaro roof . and i did a MEV edsel 2dr wagon and way more .
i have a real 60 chevy brookwood 2dr wagon too. have a great weekend 😎
 
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