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No slight intended! Your machine like productivity can only be attributed to a dedicated organization scheme. Ya just dont see many mills that you can eat off of. I always enjoy seeing the nerve center of other builders.

I always lead with the silly tray disclaimer 'cuz springs going sproing. Those tiny pick up springs launch into the nuthen' with little provocation, and the motor brushes disappear to where the missing socks go, I assume. No one really knows.

Once upon a time on a Saturday morning, my old crew chief, one of those over grown long haired alley cats was gently pawing at my nose ... because the sun had cracked the horizon and I was still horizontal. He required my opposable thumbs for breakfast and a jingle of the door knob. I was pretending to ignore him, such that lazy humans do.

Sitting just inches from my head with his tail curled, I peaked one eye open to see if he really meant it, and spotted an brand new AFX pick up spring in his elegant tail. (I'd launched the dang thing earlier in the week, and he'd kindly dust mopped it from under my work table.

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A much needed nap after a long day of ...

napping.
Is that ol' Gus?
 

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Thank you very kindly, NTx.

I took care to wash the car so as not to wreck the vintage decals.

I'm thankful Bill prompted me to crack it open and check inside. It's a bit new to me yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #145 ·
Rich is right of course, the Dino is a vintage plum, AND we had some slot car fun! Made even better by Ken's absolutely killer macro pictures.

What we have is a later, open rivet Tuff Ones chassis. A later (relative) T-jet red/grey armature. Evident by the patent number, the T-jet gearplate wasnt original to the TO chassis. The final drive is standard t-jet 9 tooth. The hooked teeth on the pinion gear reveal that it has some serious enjoyment on it. No biggee though. The addition of the AFX axle and wheel sets surely improved the handling, a common thing from the land of yore.

Theres a bit more to investigate if you're game.

*******

Doba: Yessir that would be Gus on watch. Likely one the best natured critters I've ever known. He made 18 years. Funny, he never really chased slot cars, but immediately pounced and killed Aurora vibrators, making his preference known. I was not allowed to run them in his presence. LMAO
 

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Rich Dumas
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It looks like someone substituted A/FX wheels and motor brushes for the original T-Jet ones. T-Jets can be fussy about using the proper lubrication, especially where the lower end of the armature shaft goes through the chassis. I would avoid using grease. The wrong oil will not last very long in that location. If the end of the motor shaft goes dry you will soon hear the dreaded T-Jet squeak of death and if you persist in running the car the armature could burn up and the chassis could melt. I would replace the A/FX motor brushes with high quality aftermarket T-jet brushes.

See this tuning article: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1msYjFT2HVbaSxNC5g_QhEwM8cjBHyDNf/view?usp=sharing
 

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Freehand Tubular Willys: Letting go of the handrail.

On a RAOK, this black Willys arrived from drag racer and ambassador to the hobby, Al Pink. Ordinarily one of the rarer and desirable bodies, this one had wheel wells butchered up past the bikini line. A bit much as a restoration project, I still wanted something special for it. The back story is that I'd dogged out of a 'Tilt Nose Willys Contest' some years back, and our resident instigator and attendance taker Chris Chainsaw Johnson never let up on my absence. After all, what are slot buddys for? I finally lumped it all together into a build inside my head over the holidays a few years back. The result was a build that exploded off my work top.

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Only one stick/rod of brass is used here. The center point of the rod is found and the chassis is bent into submission from that point forward. Left and right sides are siamesed using draftsmans dividers. This removes transfer errors to and from a steel rule and back to the work piece. The trick of it is to triangulate off the rear mount and the project center line, by rotating the distance locked into the divider, over to the opposite side of the chassis. Cross measuring made easy, if you will. Each new point can be quickly checked with it's neighbor on the same side, it's mirror neighbor on the other side, or the centerline; as quickly as you can size the gap, then set and lock the points. Not only does this work for plotting on the X and Y axiis, but also on the occasional Z line aspects of a build, where many projects land in the dimensional ditch.

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I like to leave the rear axle tube whole, then cut the center out after all the lateral components are soldered. As the project moves forward, the individual 'working' components are slid on like a sishkabab, using captive joints . If you keep it tight, the components will hold their position until you are is ready to clamp and solder them.

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When loaded into an old Willys body, such that you can with long portions of yet to be used material, we see that I needed to yank things back towards center. After the motor bulkheads are soldered, the rudiments of a combination axle tube hanger and drop arm hanger are slid on.

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I like the double journal technique. They provide a near frictionless effect where only a light touch will do. Here the hanger, the axle carrier, the axle, and the drop arm pivot are all combined in a foursome on one horizonatal line, to keep things compact and maximize forward space; which is always at a premium on an H0 slot car.

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When all the bits are screwed together using the original front screw post, the frame horns are captured between the nose bracket and the nose itself. I snuck a piece of mesh in for giggles. The clear PTEG braid carrier is pert near invisible, which is kinda the point.

*******

More to follow!
 

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boLHauG.jpg


One laced up, the PTEG braid carrier is pert near invisible, and thats kinda the point.

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After slicing the nose off, a mere sliver is all that separates the two body sides from pigeon toeing. A much needed firewall was constructed from the rear deck of an AFX Shadow, with very little alteration.

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After years of hassling with wheel well repairs, I developed a new method. With the chassis mounted in the body, a couple of old Tyco rubber tires are not fully installed.

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Liquid plastic is applied and allowed to seek it's own level.

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After a few passes have cured the chassis is removed, the fenders are under cut for clearance. The outboard excess is pared away. Both the interior and exterior are reskimmed and contoured to profile.

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Baby's got back! I leave them just a hair chubbier than stock.

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The grandyuns latched onto this one right after contour sanding and a brush out with 3502 for smoothing. I never got to polish it. Maybe some day! The slung down 440 box motor is a wicked flux monster. This chassis works a lot like a Drop Through Riggen. Glide into the entrance under control, crush the throttle and growl through the corner under acceleration.

A bit plain, but all smiles by the end of the back straight!
 

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Sybil began on a whacky, but really cool experimental steering chassis made from a lamination of a steel Tycopro 1 pan, and a brass Tycopro pan. I just couldnt get into a body for it, so the mechanism was deleted.

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The remnants of wrecked barf green AFX panel are sliced and diced accordingly.

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The connective tissue is whittled up from various donor bit with the right shape.

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I always have a pile of prospective bits that move in or out of the build as things progress.

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The header bow of an AFX Baja made a good dash. The rear valence of a pinto funny car provides the parcel shelf, and the roof panel made a dandy deck lid.

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A spindle set was bent up to adapt to the pan configuration.

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T-jet idlers are bored to mimic vintage finned drums.

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A paper clip windshield frame and back to the donor Pinto for mounts

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A windshield from a cassette box, heated over my iron to get the curve.

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A jail bar grill soldered up from sewing pins

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Headers from brass tube stock. I'd grown weary of making due with Hot Wheels hand me downs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #153 ·
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Hugger orange with a gold frost sealed in clear. Emerald green metallic flames, also frosted and sealed in clear.

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I ham handedly broke the off one of the sweet Strombergs, and had to substitute injector horns

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The laminated pan was a bit rickety after clean up, so I knicked a new pan out of 033 sheet.
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The dash pod is an etched bit off a gang sheet of instrumentation I snagged at our local hobby store before it closed it's doors

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I snifed the headlamps off and AFX Model A grill that had tossed it's plating.

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A fun little car. Even on a short build triangle, it has plenty of grunt to push through the apex, whichever way it's spun ... LOL
 

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Bill. If having too much fun was against the law. The slot car police would be on the lookout for you!

That's another amazing build. Love the car, the colour, and the flames.
 

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Bill,

I have run out of superlatives, but beautiful work. That stuff should be in a museum eventually.

On the paint jobs I have done I find the corners knock off the paint upon "usage". Any tips for that?
 

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Ken: The slot car Five Oh ? They tried to take my flexible template away in grade school, and I've been running ever since. What is the statute of limitations on non conformism? Maybe they finally gave up ... LOL.

Bob: Oh yes, a few tips that you can employ, but they involve my near psychotic prep ritual.

1. A sharp 90 degree edge is bad juju, and thus verbotten. If you look at pert near everything Ive done over the years there wont be many sharp/hard edges. It doesnt mean that one goes to ridiculous proportions to radius the edges, simply a stroke or two so that the liquid film can roll over uniformly; instead of hanging thinly on a raggity ungroomed edge. Consider that the film shrinks as it cures, so any edge becomes stress loaded and the material is thin. I'll do the inside edges as well. Many failures start from a neglected inside edge, because the attitude is that it doesnt show, so why do it? Ya cant fix that mindset.

Typically I wait until the finish work in the 1200 or 1500 stage to relieve those potential paint crackers. I always long stroke those lines longitudinally. On the microscopic level the paint film adheres better to a long striated pattern, than the short ringlet pattern, if one were to roll the strokes over perpendicular to the edge.

2. Seams, shuts, and blind corners where you just cant get are problematic. Coarse compound is worked in to clean and scuff the crannies during the finish stage, using hard toothpicks, and or one of those rubber tipped dental tools for ones gums. When the pick blunts off, trim it clean with your hobby blade and carry on.

Yeah it takes a coupla extra minutes, but it's H0, tiny, and theres no excuse.

3. On the day of painting. Cleanser. Old school. Comet Ajax **** n Span ...whatever, so long as you can make it into a gritty rouge. A tooth brush with the bristles trimmed back a snip, so that they have some attitude is used. I scritch and scratch the work piece carefully. More strokes, less pressure, so you dont break anything. Rinse thoroughly and blow it dry with compressed air.

4. Using good light and my readers, I inspect for anything that might interrupt the flow of the liquid paint film. Whatever flaw it might be, will appear 800 times larger when painted. Foreign objects will always flip up via back draft onto one of the main planar surfaces like the hood, roof , or trunk. Bank on it. If the inspection and minor corrections get too long and involved with greazy finger touching, I'll repeat step 3.

5. Cut in. Typically the body is flipped over so one can spray the back side. The pressure is reduced to ten psi or even lower. Im looking for the minimum workable spray pattern, and still have it liquid, so that it can be delivered precisely around the inside edges, as well as up and under the green house. I'll doodle around maybe twice, focusing on only coverage of the areas that always let loose and spoil a job down the road.

6. Following the cut in and still during flash, I'll raise the pressure back up somewhere between 10 and 20 psi depending on the material and begin two good liquid coats in succession; so that the liquid coat can get a wet bite on the unflashed cut in coat.

Probably more that you wanted to hear Bob. I get away with a lot, because my prep regimen is neurotic, I only use lacquers, and can deliver the films with a fair amount of precision using the airbrush.

oAlzk0A.jpg


Bad Apple
 

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is the above english ?

well what ever language it is , the results are .... well just awesome

the flames on a HO body have just blown me away

great work ... keep it up and please continue to display here

all scales can surely gain from this

thanks

kev
 

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Thank you sir. Paint 1:1 stuff (no Charlie Hutton, or even his assistant, for sure) from time to time (sometimes lots of time), so I followed right along and am there on most of it.

And already go to great pains to remove casting flash and typically other "blems" (like door handles and whatnot).

But the paint, per se... Used to spray 1:1 lacquer and loved it. Typically use spray bombs and probably tend to use too much of the stuff.

Thin paint = mo betta methinks.

ps--Usually work outdoors. One of my favorite experiences is when a bug starts doing the backstroke in one of my final clearcoats. Thank goodness for prep-sol.
 

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is the above english ?

well what ever language it is , the results are .... well just awesome

the flames on a HO body have just blown me away

great work ... keep it up and please continue to display here

all scales can surely gain from this

thanks

kev
Kev, Kinda sorta in Hinklish. Bob and I have been jabbering back and forth for years across the slot forums, and admittedly we massacre the English lankwich into a devolved form.

The secret(s) to the flame work above are vinyl masks from Flamemasks Inc. I like to lay a coat of clear over the area where the mask will lay. Combined with the vinyl's inherent flexibility it ensures a smooth base and thus a tight seal at the masks edges. There's nothing worse than a mask that lifts or moves.

The flame body should be shot perpendicular to the work piece at minimum pressure, with the thought being: If you dont aim pressurized liquid paint under the edge of a mask, it wont go under there! A good rule for graphics in general. Ideally one only shoots enough paint to cover and establish the effect. It's a mask, not a paint dam, dammit. (A choice quote from one of my grizzled mentors)

The masks are lifted after the paint has flashed off (not sticky), but isnt hardened off. Importantly, it should still take a nail print. I run the back of my finger nail around the edges of the licks to knock down any overly proud areas that might be a little ragged or sticking up; which would mess up the coming clear coats. As the art work is quite thin, it's good practice to dust a pair of light clear coats over the area and let them cure. This important sealing step ensures that ensuing coats of liquid clear, wont bite through and wash your work away. A painful occurrence, indeed!

All this really means, is that we drop a minimum of color on, rather than sealing that color onto the work piece as a heavy liquid coat/puddle, which would leave a monstrous tape edge. The light seal comes after the mask has been lifted. The trick of it is that the light seal coats of clear are supposed to overspray across the art and onto the workpiece's base coat. This minor overspray is swallowed up by the final clear coats and disappears.

The point of it is to create a non permeable protective layer over the graphic with zero tape edge, so the hot liquid clear can go down as a uniform film.

Thanks for the kind thoughts. I always hope that I can encourage hobbyists to pull the trigger in a relaxed prepared way, with a measure of confidence, and the certainty that there will be success.

Bill

The Orange car's flames from above were applied after painting the base color. On this green example the flames were reserved from the get go. Slightly different procedures. Either way looks fine.

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Light touch with a perpendicular shooting angle. Note: full color with a minimum of material running up the the mask edge.

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Lime Ice final color coats. The mask is quite visible, not drowned.

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Mask peeled, but not nailed. there will always be a crispy or two after you lift the mask.

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Now nailed, you can see that I dont go crazy here. Just massage the edge to knock it down and remove any crispys that are loose. NEVER pick at it!

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Clear lightly puffed over the art work to seal the edges. I doodle around once, and then lightly down the side once.

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The light passes at proper angles ensures that we dont have huge tide lines at the color breaks.

Clear is a matter of taste and another chapter for another day. Regardless of the type or amount of sheen, it's important to get it down evenly and wait for it to flash. When it looks uniform after flashing, maybe even an insurance pass or two. When gloss is used, you know your close to right when you can pick up subtle reflections, like the back of the radius rod reflected across the cowling.

As you can see, flames are not hard at all, merely extra steps on the usual list.
 

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thankyou for the explanation

think i might try something similar with the next body

kev
 
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