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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi ,

Just bought my first fibreglass sports car body from betta and am wondering what's the best way to get the wheel arches cut out? I've not done any kind of modelling and it's my first scratch build project. If it goes well I will definitely do some more.

Thanks
 

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Jon Grainger
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3,825 Posts
Hi Ryan,

I would use a Dremmel with the sanding disk attachment to get a really smooth finish. You can use a high speed to get it started and remove the excess material, then use the lowest speed you can (1 or 2 on the dial) to finish off, going slowly and following the moulded line.

I try and do this in good light, preferably outside, so I can see the line as clearly as possible, and then just take a tiny bit off at a time, and then go around in one smooth motion to shape it so that it looks right.

Take it easy and it will be fine,
Regards
Jon
 

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...and protect yourself. Wear a mask. I even can't stand touching this stuff without gloves. Tiny little invisible splitter which will go through your skin into your body.
Awful material and it looks like I am reacting allergic. Close the same with resine.
I stopped working with it before I really began.

Don't panic. Most people don't react like me.
They just die earlier..........ouch bad boy!

As a conclusion - please take care.


It's good to have the chassis and may a separate wheel just to compare roundings after every working step. Mark carefully before you start.
 

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Jan Groosmuller
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I also would use a Dremel or similar, but instead of a disc I would use various drums.
Big drum high speed for the excess material, small drum and low speed for the final shaping.

Since you're working with fibreglass WEAR A DUST MASK (even outside) !
 

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Mike Newns
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629 Posts
A convenient way to finish off after having removed to main waste with a Dremel is to use sandpaper wrapped round an old wine bottle cork.

Mike
 

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I have a tile saw with a round, multi directional, blade which I find useful for little jobs such as this - you can get tile saw blades for a junior hacksaw from B&Q.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys,

As I don't have a dremel the other options look more feasible at this moment in time.

Will revert this evening and let you know how it goes

Thanks again

Ryan
 

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I also use a dremel and a sanding drum, works great. If you are going to be doing this a few times, it's worth investing in a dremel, it's very handy for all sorts of things.

Randy
 

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I also use a dremel with a sanding drum (ditto
). It's quite handy but for the finish. To finish off, I'm used to sand by hand, but next time I'll have a try with Mike's very good tip :

QUOTE (Mike Newns @ 19 Jul 2011, 15:38) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>A convenient way to finish off after having removed to main waste with a Dremel is to use sandpaper wrapped round an old wine bottle cork.
Mike
 

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A good alternative to a wine bottle cork for manual sanding is a socket spanner handle. Not a ratchet handle but the type you insert and use vertically (like a screwdriver). Use the stem as your handle. That gives you much more to grip than with a cork.
I'm talking about an all-metal handle, not one with a plastic grip, which would have ridges or whatever.
The metal grip part of mine is just under an inch in diam and has only very shallow criss-cross serrations.
Rob J
 
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