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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With lane changes you need to mix up your approach to the course because you are not always in the same lane. This takes additional skill, its not just memorization.

Additionally, cars in your lane may affect your acceleration and deceleration points.

I think these are huge benefits of digital.
 

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from my brief goes at demos, it seemed as if i would have to develope skills of watching the road (track) ahead of the car - to see if there was a slow/crashed car ahead etc. I haven't had enough time to try to developw that skill - do you find yourself doing that, or watching your own car as per analogue?
 

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QUOTE (astro @ 6 Dec 2004, 23:23)from my brief goes at demos, it seemed as if i would have to develope skills of watching the road (track) ahead of the car - to see if there was a slow/crashed car ahead etc. I haven't had enough time to try to developw that skill - do you find yourself doing that, or watching your own car as per analogue?
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I have been practicing by myself and against the ghost car. Yes, when racing against the ghost car, I need to look ahead in my peripheral vision and plan for other traffic.

If I am behind the ghost car, I'll slow down and wait for a passing opprotunity. However, if I follow directly behind, there isnt enough time to react, so there is some spacing(planning) that needs to go on and then reacting to the opposite of what the other car does. This takes lightning reaction.

If I folow directly behind, then its 50/50 whether i make it around because I am shifting blindly. The ghost car changes randomly, and this makes it good practice.

I wired the power taps in my road course and am quite happy with the action. I will suggest that a course needs a good balance of LCs, probably about one every 10 feet or less, because if you get stuck behind a car, you are stuck until the next LC. However, the action goes so fast that if you have them more frequently you cant reasonably use them.

There are other cool perks of digital. Remember with analog, the car deslots and you decide you want to run in the other lane? You would pick up the other control and put the car in the other lane. Now, you can put the car ANYWHERE and use the same control. I cant stress enough how much this adds to the experience.

Also, when the car jumps lanes, the action still goes on. No "rider" or anyhing like that.

I'm 99% certain that most slotting in the future will be digital. There are still kinks to be worked out, but as the chips get smaller and the aftermarket takes hold, there will be no reason to run analog.
 

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I too think digital is going to be the future but I can also see the point of people with some nice and expensive cars not wanting to take the chance of damage. Even with careful drivers cars are going to collide sooner or later. As a newbie I don't have any cars like that so I'm not affected but what of the people with nice collections? I love my pro x and I don't think I would be happy with analog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (indianasteve @ 7 Dec 2004, 00:14)I too think digital is going to be the future but I can also see the point of people with some nice and expensive cars not wanting to take the chance of damage. Even with careful drivers cars are going to collide sooner or later. As a newbie I don't have any cars like that so I'm not affected but what of the people with nice collections? I love my pro x and I don't think I would be happy with analog.
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I think the reason the digital crashes are so "collosal" is that the pro-x nascars are so heavy, I dont think it has anything to do with it being digital, although i havent raced with a full field yet. Of course, four cars on 28' feet of oval is only 7' of track for each car. With that kind of density there will be alot of crashes but that is more a course design issue.

Rear end collisions dont really do that much damage. The WORST collisions I have witnessed are in analog racing where a car jumps lanes and then goes full throttle into an MDF wall under the control of an unsuspecting opponent. No more of this with digital!

I dont know any analog racecars that arent missing parts or have been glued back together. I could see racing against noobs as a problem because they are so much slower, but expect that experienced racers on a well known course will look much like real racing, with multiple cars following on the same line lap after lap, waiting for the leader to make a mistake.
 

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Fast Co.
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QUOTE expect that experienced racers on a well known course will look much like real racing, with multiple cars following on the same line lap after lap, waiting for the leader to make a mistake.

I don't really know all that much about digital racing. It seems like it takes traditional analog much further in terms of it's similarities to real racing. But it seems to me that one would only be able to take advantage of a lead car's mistake if that mistake occured in the vicinity of one of the LC tracks. Unlike real racing cars following the same race line of the leader will not have an opportunity to pass until arrival at the LC.

Steve
 

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Allan Wakefield
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QUOTE I think the reason the digital crashes are so "collosal" is that the pro-x nascars are so heavy, I dont think it has anything to do with it being digital, although i havent raced with a full field yet. Of course, four cars on 28' feet of oval is only 7' of track for each car. With that kind of density there will be alot of crashes but that is more a course design issue.

The F1 carts are alot lighter but still crash hard and fall apart (front wing designed to come away so it gets left off and looks nasty, t<res too big for rims and are always coming partly off causing the cars to run badly). I put this down almost completely to the lack of brakes on Pro X.
To my mind a huge oversight on Carreras part.
With Digital comes the need for fast reactions combined with 'road sense' AND hard braking so why oh why did they not give braking???
 

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QUOTE (sacesta @ 7 Dec 2004, 02:41)But it seems to me that one would only be able to take advantage of a lead car's mistake if that mistake occured in the vicinity of one of the LC tracks. Unlike real racing cars following the same race line of the leader will not have an opportunity to pass until arrival at the LC.

Steve
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on a real rave track, there are only a few real overtaking oportunites anyway. u get stuck behind people until a good moment anyway. therfore, digital is realistic!
 

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Unfortunately, although in a (debatable) sense that might be considered 'realistic', for the majority of slottists, it's one of the less desirable attributes. No matter how 'realistic' it might seem at first glance, it is simply no fun being stuck in that position, none at all. It's a really good way to ensure that people lose interest and it's already quite hard to maintain it on a regular basis.
 

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Cars go so fast that lane change opportunities present themselves every 1-2s. If there are only 2 LCs, then you get fewer chances.

With more LCs, the number of paths thru the course increase exponentially and the chance of getting stuck is less. I currently have 6LCs and am planning for 8 or 10. (Street price of Carrera LCs is $25)

Also, I have developed a ruleset that will keep cars from getting locked behind. After all a faster car can ram a slower one off the track. Its more a question of what slower traffic must do to AVOID being run over.
 

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I have been doing a serious amount of testing on my layout.

Typically, when you are catching up to a car, you can see in your periphery where it is on track, but its much more difficult to tell which lane it is in as well, until you get close.

However. . . I have found that using your ears will give you the information you need.

First, iff you are trailing a car and want to get around it, if you are very close behind, it is 50/50 whether you will still be trailing after the LC. If you are too close, there is not enough time to choose the opposite lane. If you use your ears to tell you what the opponent is doing, you can respond MUCH faster than trying to visually determine what he did. Trust me on this. If you hear the click, dont change lanes. No click, hit your button.

Second, your ears really help to develop a picture in your mind of what is really going on and to form strategy. Sometimes you need to choose a LC well in advance of the immediate traffic. Knowing which direction the LCs lead, using your ears is the only way to tell the path other cars are taking, but like a bat, you can develop a surprisingly accurate picture of what other cars are doing and where you need to be. (I doubt this works for double LCs ala SCX)
 

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Jim Moyes
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Perhaps then, the Carrera LCs are deliberately noisy. We did remark on how much noise they made at Toyfair almost a year ago.

Trouble is, will they still be heard in a noisy clubroom.

But a good tip for people in your situation, Darainbow.

Mr.M
 
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