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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think my track is not.

I did a little test, I ran 10 laps with F22 tires then ran 10 laps with S2 tires then ran 10 laps with the F22 tires again(A B A). The 3rd set of laps with the F22 tires were a little faster then the first set of laps with the F22 tires. I did this test twice on 2 different lanes with the same results.

So my conclusion, at least on my track is that it is not taking rubber and most likely never will. Tire compound, either rubber or silicone does not seem to matter as long as the track is clean. I don't think the tracks really get rubber built up unless you use something on the tires like tire glue.

Now for the specs I used a Slot.It Nissan for the test. The tires were cleaned before each set of laps. The paint on the track is satin. My son and I have been running on the track every night and weekends for the last 2 months with F15 or F22 tires. About 2000 laps.

I would think that the track would've taken rubber by now if at all.

I know this is opening up a can of worms but it is something I had to test for my self.

Jim
 

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Ian
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Jim help me out here you are running rubber for ten laps then silicon for ten laps then rubber again?
From what I understand, it is not working, I believe that what you are doing is removing any good you are doing by using both. This is why Silicones are banned at most UK clubs one works against the other. Try using just rubber for a weekend and see how that goes.

Sorry just reread that last bit and you've done that
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (Gash @ 29 Mar 2012, 11:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Doing 10 laps round a track and checking for laid down rubber is the equivalent of rolling an f1 car down the pit lane and checking for tyre wear.

Gash,

I guess you didn't read the whole post. We have run at least 2000 laps on the track with Slot.It F15 & F22 tires.
The test was just 10 laps each.

Jim
 

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do you clean your track? how do you clean your track? why do you desire to switch back & forth between compounds?

a friend of mine has had several wood tracks, the latest of which is well rubbered-in. he has decided he doesn't want to get into urethane tires, so it is rubber or silicone. my experience leads towards "one or the other", & my performance on his tracks has been like driving on ice. I have driven on another wood track that is rubber & urethane only; we have from time-to-time thrown a car out there w/ sillies on it & found that it takes about 2 weeks for the grip level to come back. now, the grip level on this latest track is fairly good & here's why: he started cleaning tires w/ WD-40. the track developed rubber grooves much more quickly & overall grip improved greatly.
i believe that the solvents in WD-40 break down the rubber tires when it makes them soft & the oils gather dust & lay down the rubber. people have soaked tires in Simple Green to make them softer, so this makes sense to me.
on my track (when completed) will have a no-silicone rule.
 

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My general point being that you cannot do a test of 30 laps, on different compounds, and come to the conclusion that your track doesn't rubber up. Your point about 2000 laps I accept however i bet you run different compounds. but u concluded after your test of 10 Laps 3 times over, plus if your taping your tyres I bet the tape has more rubber on it than the track.

Besides some tracks are quicker clean anyway
 

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QUOTE (martini917k @ 29 Mar 2012, 12:52) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>do you clean your track? how do you clean your track? why do you desire to switch back & forth between compounds?

a friend of mine has had several wood tracks, the latest of which is well rubbered-in. he has decided he doesn't want to get into urethane tires, so it is rubber or silicone. my experience leads towards "one or the other", & my performance on his tracks has been like driving on ice. I have driven on another wood track that is rubber & urethane only; we have from time-to-time thrown a car out there w/ sillies on it & found that it takes about 2 weeks for the grip level to come back. now, the grip level on this latest track is fairly good & here's why: he started cleaning tires w/ WD-40. the track developed rubber grooves much more quickly & overall grip improved greatly.
i believe that the solvents in WD-40 break down the rubber tires when it makes them soft & the oils gather dust & lay down the rubber. people have soaked tires in Simple Green to make them softer, so this makes sense to me.
on my track (when completed) will have a no-silicone rule.

Martini917K

I'm not switching between rubber & silicone just wanted to try a test that people say if you run silicones it removes all the rubber. If you are talking about switching between F15 & F22 I've found some cars run better than aothers with the different tires.
I don't clean the track just the tires with tape or a lint roller. My track is in the garage and gets extremely dirty.

QUOTE (Gash @ 29 Mar 2012, 13:13) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>My general point being that you cannot do a test of 30 laps, on different compounds, and come to the conclusion that your track doesn't rubber up. Your point about 2000 laps I accept however i bet you run different compounds. but u concluded after your test of 10 Laps 3 times over, plus if your taping your tyres I bet the tape has more rubber on it than the track.

Besides some tracks are quicker clean anyway

Gash,

The only rubber compounds we've run are the F15 & F22. My understanding is that these tires are just different hardness.

Jim
 

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Hi Guys.
It comes down to 'Rubber'!
Rubber tyres uesd to be made mostly of 'rubber'. New multi compound mixes are much more complex. Forget silicone for the moment, but even they are no longer just 'silicone'.
The F series tyres in the Slot it range are not laying down 'rubber' on our newly resurfaced Wolverhampton SCC 'International' track. Their 'P' range tyres over a fairly short time did so. With the F tyres, we are getting in the braking area a rather nasty, sticky, goop type deposit, this is a problem as front tyres pick up on this giving rough 'juddering' under braking.
This can be minimized by using very hard and varnished front tyres, but is best if removed from the track using lighter fluid.
It comes down to how 'rubber' tyres acheive their grip...through soft, with 'bubble', real rubber texture or sticky, hard base, 'chemist compound' grip (F tyres).
As has been worked out many years ago, run similar compounds and there is no problem...mix them at your peril!
Regards Bill
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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We only use rubber tyres and our tracks are well rubbered in. I tested some F15 tyres and found that with 10 to 15 laps they would loose grip because they appear to be lifting rubber from the track surface. I would clean them and they would be OK for another 10 to 15 laps. This does not happen with other "rubber" tyres. We use NSR Ultras which are ver soft with no problems.
So it may be that the Slot It F compounds will simply not rubber up a track, as you track is subject to dust I would try some NSR, Ninco, Sloting Plus etc soft tyres to see if they will lay down some rubber. Silicones require a very clean track for good grip. Eurethanes are a good compromise But again still don,t mix well with other types of tyres.
This conclusion is made for our routed painted track, after years of constant testing,each time a new tyres appears on the market.
 

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As your track gets dirty, an even better reason to stay away from silicones, which need clean conditions to really work well. The "F" series tires are pretty good & the 22's are my fav; the new C1's are very good; I think we mix in some P6's as well. We've been having good luck w/ NSR Ultra & Super. I have run some old Ortmann's & they hook up well. Yellowdog urethanes tend to behave like sillies, they work better on a clean track.
I prefer a track w/ a clean line, but marbles where they should be; I love seeing tracks through them when a car goes off. I started out w/ Indy Grips, I like them because they scrub clean, but that was also when I ran w/ mags.
Ninco, BRM, & the "F" series by Slot.it use the "Shore" scale of rubber hardness, the lower the #, the softer the rubber. My guess is that NSR Ultra's are about 22, Super's closer to 30. Slot.it S2's seem to be about the mid 20's, S1's around 30+. Yellowdogs are vacuum cast, which makes them denser than their resin would normally be, I'm guessing they start w/ Shore 35 material.
 
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