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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well here I go, this is my first attempt at a scratch build slot car. Please go easy on me and do point out if there is anything I have stupidly not thought about.
I've done a fair bit of modeling in the past with a lot of Warhammer40k painting and customising, so I'm not a total novice with this sort of stuff.

I've ordered
an Arii Supra static kit which is currently in transit from OZ.

I've already got
a PCS 32 chassis kit from www.pendleslotracing.co.uk
Inc:
guide blade + wires
18,000 Mabuchi S motor
5 spoke chrome wheels

This little lot


Still to sort out
Paint / varnish
Graphics - i'll be ordering handy art paper to print my own graphics.
Possible new set of wheels

So far I've put the Chassis bits together, not soldered yet as you can see.

Now I have a couple of questions.

In several picture of other cars I've seen there is some sort of resistor attached to the motor is this essential, do I have to get one of these before connecting the power cables to the motor?

The wire from the guide blade isn't actually long enough to reach the motor.
I'm thinking is would be easiest just to get some new wire and run longer wires from the blade. does this sound reasonable or would ti be better to add wire to whats there?

I'll post more pics as it comes together.

Any advice would be greatly received.
 

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Circuit Owner
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The resistor you asked about is actually called the "ferrite man" and is a capacitor and ferrite core designed to clean electrical signal "noise" (interference feedback caused by the motor) into the track. This makes no difference whatsoever with analogue so, as Julian says, it is not needed.

BUT if you do ever move to digital you will need the ferrite man either across the motor or across the guide - it is supplied with digital chips so you don't have to buy it separately. Its function is to make sure the digital signal carried alongside the power is not corrupted and so avoids cars going haywire.

If you acquire more cars and they have the ferrite man - leave it in place as it doesn't adversely affect analogue running.

Good luck with the Supra.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the helpful info guys.
I have now ordered some new brass ferrules, and i'll keep in mind the ferrite man for once my boys are old enough to want new track for christmas. then i'll venture in to digital. For now i'm just running on some classic track I recently got out of the loft.

Thanks again guys. All help / advice is gratefully received.

Dan
 

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I've found a little time this weekend and the early build stages of my Supra are underway.
Cassis all running nicely. Length set, engine gears and bearings oiled.



I wanted to try and use as much of the kits interior as possible but as you can see I needed to cut a fair amount for the engine to fit thorough. Rear seats are pretty much cut out. Front seats are going to sit either side of the engine. which I will be painting black to try and hide it.



If I were starting again I would get a side winder chassis. so I could have saved more of the interior.

Still to work the mounting posts, to attached the Shell.

Really enjoyed working on this so far.
Looking forward to spray painting test, practice run will be done on an old Metro shell.
 

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David J
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Hard to tell from the photo angles but I think I'd like to see it sitting a bit lower to the ground.
5 spokes wheels in earlier photo will suit it.

Good luck with the paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
QUOTE (petestrike @ 10 Apr 2012, 18:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>coming on there!...are you sticking with the scaley dtm wheels?

Thanks Pete
I quite like the size of the DTM Wheels. They are larger than the 5 spokes that came with the PCS Chassis. and the axles are a good length.
But not sure yet. I also have a set of Drift 350z axles I might try on it.
Where can I get other wheels from? thought about looking through Scaley spares for some high detail wheels. But they only sell the front set with the chassis. this little car is starting to cost me a lot more money than I originally thought it would


QUOTE (DJ @ 10 Apr 2012, 19:02) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hard to tell from the photo angles but I think I'd like to see it sitting a bit lower to the ground.
5 spokes wheels in earlier photo will suit it.

Good luck with the paint.

Totally agree DJ.

The shell is just resting on the Chassis at the moment so the back is sitting a little high. this will be lower once the shell is all fixed together and the mounting posts are in place and screwed down.

I'm thinking street racer. Fast and the furious kind of look. I'll be trying to get the shell to sit as close to the ground as I can with out any body modification.
 

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Good start.
It's probably due to the photographic angle, but the wheels seem to stick out the wheel arches. Slightly Shortening the axles could be a solution if necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE (HAPPY @ 11 Apr 2012, 10:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Good start.
It's probably due to the photographic angle, but the wheels seem to stick out the wheel arches. Slightly Shortening the axles could be a solution if necessary.

I think you might be right Happy.
I did shorten the front a little as that was out by quite a bit. I used a pair of wire cutters as I couldn't think what else to cut them down with. Once the shell is fixed I'll look at the rears which are a little more tricky as I need to shave a little off each end with the gear in the middle of the axle.

Any advice on axle shortening would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Hello Dantaylor,

Axle's steel is usually quite strong


In order to remove some millimeters at each end, I use a mini-electric drill on which a truncating disk is mounted (corindon disk).
By using Wire cutters, there's a little risk to buckle the rear axle.
If you don't own any mini drill, you should use a small hacksaw specially made for modellers.
Regards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
QUOTE (HAPPY @ 11 Apr 2012, 12:27) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hello Dantaylor,

Axle's steel is usually quite strong


In order to remove some millimeters at each end, I use a mini-electric drill on which a truncating disk is mounted (corindon disk).
By using Wire cutters, there's a little risk to buckle the rear axle.
If you don't own any mini drill, you should use a small hacksaw specially made for modellers.
Regards.

I do have a mini drill. think i just need the correct bit for cutting / filing the axle.
and yes the wire cutters did leave a slightly chewed end to the axle
 

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Circuit Owner
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A bench grinder is good if you only need to take a small amount off. If you use one; dip the axle in cold water straight after grinding as this will retain the steel's hardness, if you let it cool down slowly it will soften (through the process of annealing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
QUOTE (pace1970uk @ 11 Apr 2012, 13:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Pendles also do steel axles of various lengths for £1.75 a pair if you don't fancy cutting the axles

might give these a try.
Thanks for the info guys.
 
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