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Scott Brownlee
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I don't think anyone has, but doubtless someone will. Of course, why anyone should want to, given that you could buy and race an old one more competitively (in historics) for less, is another question.
 

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It isn't a race car, it's a daily driver. Most of them will end up stored in garages unused though


The 5.4L motor has a very poor rod ratio so it really isn't very good for racing. It's more of a low speed truck motor. In racing conditions you toss the original internals and put in all top notch aftermarket equipment and pray. The connecting rods fail first. The 4.6L motor is MUCH better for actual racing but there is no replacement for displacement so these modular motors will go the way of the dodo shortly. (You can check with Ford, it's true, the mod motor is being phased out. I don't remember what the upcoming motor is called though. If I remember I'll post it).

But then, where I come from a 500 HP motor is just a nice street piece. Maybe where you are that's considered powerful. Perhaps it falls under the "speed is relative" heading. Anyway you look at it, the motor is too fragile and the car too underpowered to be a race car. Nice street car though.

Uh, Scott, the old ones sell for $1 million + USD here in the States. You only see them come out for show and go, nobody actually runs them that hard. You'll hear otherwise but I can assure you, they aren't raced hard. You can buy 5 of the new GTs for one old GT40, not exactly cost effective.
 

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Apart from being a "concept" car the new Ford GT has absolutely nothing to do in terms of purpose with the original Ford GT40's which were built for racing initially. The MKIII road car only came into being in 1967 3 to 4 years after conception.
As for originals racing for real try getting to the Goodwood Revival meeting.
Regards Allan
 

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Scott Brownlee
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QUOTE You'll hear otherwise but I can assure you, they aren't raced hard. You can buy 5 of the new GTs for one old GT40, not exactly cost effective.

I saw first hand the differnce between how some owners drive them at the first Classic Le Mans in 2002 and again at Goodwood in 2003. Some poodle around, others go for it or even hire young hot shoes to do it for them.

Budget wise, historic racing is better value for the rich than modern GTs or touring cars. Look at the likes of Frank Sytner, Ray Bellm and Duncan Dayton.
 
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But then, where I come from a 500 HP motor is just a nice street piece. Maybe where you are that's considered powerful. Perhaps it falls under the "speed is relative" heading.

This part of your post a Bill, I find annoying.

500hp is completely meaningless unless you state a whole list of other factors a lot of diesel lorries have huge HP but it does not mean they are fast.

The fastest cars are beautifully balanced and can use every HP over a twisting mountain road.

So how heavy are these cars?
what compound tyres do they use?
what brakes?
What kind of suspension do they use?

Now many years a go I road tested for a newspaper GTD's sprint and hillclimb GT40 this was a really fast car that handled beautifully and had race brakes fitted. It did not have 500Hp but it sure was one of the fastest thing I have ever driven.

Jeff
 

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After having had the privilege of driving a 289ci GT40 with all the period upgrades including the wider rear wheel arches filled with some seriously wide 14" GY, then a 2005 Ford GT admittedly perfectly set up on the same test track in the desert of California, I can tell you that the new GT, road car or not, will smoke the wonderful old car even on street tires. The new GT is an exceptional vehicle with friendly manners, with performance very similar to that of a good Porsche GT3 racing car on slicks, that does clean the clock off the 1964-68 icon.
I believe that only two other currently available road cars presently out-perform the $150K (list price, but good luck to get one at this price) Ford: the Porsche Carrera V10 and the Ferrari Enzo. In either case, their cost is of a much higher magnitude and while the Porsche is just extraordinary in every respect, the Enzo is a much more difficult beast to tame for the average enthusiast.
Regards,

Dok Pea
 

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Hmmm, interesting spread of opinions.

Personally, I thought it amusing that the steering rack is nicked from a Focus. Sounds like the big bumpered gal might be a 'bitsa'.

Like that new 'vette, this one leaves me cold. But I'll keep me eyes and ears open for when Clarkson gets his - he lives just down the road.
 

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From the articles reviews in the motor press and TSFR's comments, it looks like Ford's new GT is very similar to the GT40: they have beaten Ferrari at their own game yet again; in 1966 it was on the lemans track, this time it is in the luxury performance car market...
 

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It makes me sad that you try and compare a 40 year old car with a modern one. There is no point. The GT40 when running in endurance racing ie Lemans was racing with detuned engines to survive a 24hour race. The Mclaren F1 was raced in detuned form at Lemans Its road counterpart was faster. The Ford GT is a concept road car with a bigger engine size. Apart from apearence and make it has nothing in common with the GT40!!
The New Ford GT is beening called back for a suspension problem . Its also £30000 or is that dollars dearer then when first quoted.

Regards Allan

 

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don't be sad - I agree that it is a completely different vehicle, but as said above it has been designed with ferrari in mind. Plus I have seen video of some of the drivers who won at le-mans who have also driven the new car compare the 2. If they feel that the two cars can be compared, then so can anyone including fans of the original like me!
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Comparisons are unavoidable when a company releases a vehicle with such strong visual and identity links to an earlier product. But automobiles, like all other forms of technology, have advanced so far in 40 years that if the new GT wasn't better than the GT40 it would have quickly been labelled as a complete failure. Rather than viewing comparisons as detrimental to the GT40's history, I see Ford's release of the GT as a clear statement of pride in the original, awareness of the public's fondness for the fabeled GT40, and a determination to produce a new car worthy of the Ford GT badge.

@ Wankel: If you think a Focus steering rack is out-of-place, you would have had a field day with my Formula 4.... steering rack from an Austin America.... oil filter element in the dry sump system from an Austin A40 (find that on the shelf of your local stockist!)... etc. !!
 

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QUOTE The New Ford GT is beening called back for a suspension problem

More Focus bits? Tee, hee.

Worthy of the Ford badge? Well if they are recalling 'em then it must be living up to scratch. (Runs away to hide)

Austin America? Never heard of it. Had to go look-see on Gongle.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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QUOTE Well if they are recalling 'em then it must be living up to scratch.

Wankel, really! I expected you to quote some of the FORD acronym expansions..... like "Found On Road Dead", or "Fix Or Repair Daily".... you let me down... you must be losing your "focus"....
 

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I agree with Mr Pea that new cars whoop up on the old ones, but that's to be expected. The technological advances over the years are really paying off in the automotive field. Now if only tire companies could keep up


But then, where I come from a 500 HP motor is just a nice street piece. Maybe where you are that's considered powerful. Perhaps it falls under the "speed is relative" heading.

This part of your post a Bill, I find annoying.

500hp is completely meaningless unless you state a whole list of other factors a lot of diesel lorries have huge HP but it does not mean they are fast.


Well, we were speaking in terms of horsepower available to gasoline powered motor cars such as that advertised by Ford for the GT but you can throw in diesels if you like. My point was simply that 500 HP isn't that much power by todays standards on street cars. 20 years ago, yeah, it was good power and barely streetable, but today? Any race car worth its salt needs way more than 500 HP to get anywhere. But as I also stated, perhaps it's relative as I'm used to higher powered street cars. I wouldn't even consider a car making 500 HP, whether it be diesel or gasoline, truck or automobile, to be competitive in racing, any racing.

Here's an American diesel to look at. I stopped knocking diesels about two years ago when I saw a 6000+ lbs F350 Super Duty Ford Pickup truck on street tires run the 1/4 faster than a Cobra street car
Diesels are torque motors, not HP, but that doesn't mean they're pigs. You just approach them from a different angle.

Cars are my vice.
 

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Fellows! Kool down.

Someone here offered the comparison, and of course it is not a fair one. But truth is, many modern road cars could run circles around older potent racing cars. It is just called...technical progress. It is by no means demeaning to the older cars, which have an aura of their own that they will never lose. Indeed i would rather have a period GT40 than a mere 2005 Ford GT, but I would rather have a 2005 GT than a GT40 replica, regardless of how well it would be done.
As far as using Focus bits, more power to them since the Focus is one of the nicest little cars ever built, with wonderful and fun handling and manners for very little money.
I don't know what they found wrong with the rear suspension on the GT to warrant a recall, but the one I drove was wonderful and had no vices of any kind, so I assume that it has to do with a safety (read legal liability, because no one REALLY cares about people's safety nowadays anyway...) issue. May be they found that the heim joints rust after 200000 miles of winter driving in salt around Detroit or something like that...

All I know is that it takes a seriously good driver to go fast with a period GT40, while an average driver CAN go very fast indeed with the Ford GT because as many modern cars do, it forgives most of the mistaskes from lack of serious driving education. Whatever it is a plus or a minus becomes a matter of personal preference, but let me say that it is a bit like working two computers, and one of them is in MS-DOS while the other is running XP.
Regards,

Dok Pea
 

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Well said Dok Pea.

My communications skills are sorely lacking, probably due to my lack of education, so perhaps I should point out that at no time do I take anything posted on a forum seriously. Conversely, nothing I say should be taken seriously either
 

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MG Brown
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I agree that the new Ford GT seems to be the opposite of the previous GT-40.

The GT40 being a race car that was adapted to road service.

The Ford GT being a "retro" road car that with some luck might end up on the track.

Not knowing what the future might hold... but wouldn't it be interesting if Ford chose to develop the new car for GT class racing...ideally against the Corvettes and Ferrari 550's in IMSA GTS racing?

As Carly Simon once sang... "These are the good old days"
 

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Kinda seems sad that whilst Ferrari (another marque I'm no big fan of) produce modern cars with references and styling cues from their glorious past, i.e. sharknose 430, Ford, missing in any recent glory choose to hark back to a bygone era, live a little in the past and leave the field of modern GT racing to others.

I doubt very much that you will ever see this new GT-40 at Le Mans or any other race track.
 
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