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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Here are a couple of pictures of some partially painted 1/32nd scale Ford GT40 vacuum-formed bodies, expertly made by Derick Thesnaar of Cape Town.

The poor quality of the pictures don't do Derick's superb workmanship any justice:-









From left to right, the 7-litre "experimental" Ford GT 40, chassis number 106, driven by Ken Miles and Bruce McLaren at Le Mans in 1965. The car qualified on pole and led the race for 2 hours, until retired with gearbox failure. The car sports a long nose, canard wings and tail-fins, to try to keep the monster glued to the road!



The body in the centre is the Ford X-1, chassis number 110, the McLaren-built car entered in the USRRC sports car races in 1965, the forerunner to the Can-Am series. The X-1 had four outings, driven by Chris Amon, but was too heavy to be competitive. It was dubbed ''Big Ed'', in reference to the Ford Edsel failure of the 50s.



During 1966 Ford rebuilt GT/110 into a Mk. II roadster and won the Sebring 12 Hours, driven by Ken Miles and Lloyd Ruby.



Kind regards

Russell
 

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Premium Member
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5,676 Posts
Anti-blob-snobs?

You couldn't have drawn me in any faster had you posted a title like "Liz Hurley Nude Photos Shocker"


Did you get your photo of the real deal from a book? If so, which?
 

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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Hi Wankel,

Actually, I thought that the blackened shut-lines would appeal to you more!

The pictures were scanned from the book "The Ford That Beat Ferrari" by Gordon Jones and John Allen. Unfortunately, it's out-of-print and highly collectable. Expect to pay a lot if you want one, I've seen them selling for more than $500 on eBay!

This website is a great resource for GT40 pictures. Scroll to the bottom of the page and you will find links to eight picture gallerys, showing a pictorial history of the GT40 in competition, from 1964 to 1970.

Kind regards,

Russell
 

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Premium Member
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5,676 Posts
Russell, well it was the dodgy grill on the rear deck of that No 71 that took my eye!


Indulge me with a genuine enquiry from a vac-hater but not some set-up for a quick retort, I'm curious, how do they stand up in use? Does the paint crack and peel?
 

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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Personally, I prefer Lexan (polycarbonate) vacuum-formed bodies for racing, as they are extremely light yet withstand heavy crashes. I like 10 thou thick bodies, which are also flexible, but they do split at sharply curved areas if not reinforced. 20 thou thick Lexan bodies can probably withstand even higher impact than injection-moulded plastic bodies but are obviously more rigid than 10 thou thick bodies.

The problem with Lexan is that it is a difficult material to vac-form and detail is often lost. Some vacuum-formers are better than others though, the nicest and most detailed Lexan bodies that I've ever seen are those produced by Victor Ferguson of Truescale Products.

PETG (polyethylene terephtalate glycol) is easier to mould and produces bodies with good definition but is not nearly as impact-proof as Lexan. Polystyrene is also light but needs to be painted on the outside, as you would paint a plastic body.

In terms of the paint adhering, as with any painting it is down to the proper preparation. I always wash the body in lukewarm water with dishwashing liquid soap (whether its a vac or injection moulded body), rinse it clean and thoroughly dry it with a lint free cloth prior to painting. I always paint clear bodies from the inside, for Lexan I use special paints made for polycarbonate such as Pactra's RC paint or Tamiya's polycarbonate paints. I use water-based acrylics on PETG bodies.

Details can be drawn onto the Lexan using a Rotring Isograph 'P' or similar pen with etching ink, from either the inside or the outside:-







It's best to use an airbrush and do a number of light passes. I've never had paint flaking. Using enamel paints on Lexan or PETG is a recipe for disaster as it peels off very easily, even with the best preparation.

Polystyrene bodies can be treated in the same way as you would paint and clear-coat a plastic body.



For fine examples of beautifully detailed vac-formed bodies, take a look at MTR32.

With kind regards,

Russell
 

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Russell Sheldon
Joined
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2,855 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
"Incidentally the X1 raced with the same nose as the MkII 1965 7 litres!!!"

In the first few races, they even used the nose complete with headlights, until they realised that lights weren't required and they were just carrying even more weight!



Kind regards,

Russell
 

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Alan Tadd
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4,039 Posts
Superb Russell, Derick does produce some excellent shells.

My "Pre production" X1 is still running very well , despite the Scaleauto motor threatening to launch it into orbit at the slightest depression of the throttle...


Regards

Alan
 

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Russell Sheldon
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2,855 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hoo-boy! No offense meant, just a bit of banter. Besides, it sounds more respectful than "slobs".


Snob
noun

One who affects an offensive air of self-satisfied superiority in matters of taste or intellect.

verb
Definition: avoid
Synonyms: cold-shoulder, disregard, evade, neglect, ostracize, skip, snub, spurn, stay away, turn aside.


Kind regards

Russell
 

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Administrator
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9,906 Posts
It was a very legitimate question and I don't think there was any offense meant anywhere guys.

There's a bit of a tongue in cheek historic subtext to Russell's remarks, if I'm not mistaken (and correct me if I'm wrong RS).

Starting in 64 or so, two columnists in Car Model magazine in the States had a knock-down, drag-out fight in their columns about many things, especially "blob" bodies, as Pete Hagenbuch, the Midwest columnist was was a 1/32 club guy, called them... He was opposed by Ben Millspaugh, from the Southwest, who was a real 1/24 commercial raceway guy, in favor of vac-formed bodies and lesser detail for the commercial raceways (although capable of concours level work himself). This became a sort of self-perputuating joke and running battle over the years, although things were attenuated as the vac bodies got better. Pete even did an article on building a concours vac-formed McLaren, with his own engineered sidewinder chassis - but given the amount of work he put into it, and the added reinforcement, he would have been better off doing a fiberglass body right from the start.

So any reference to "blob" bodies, snobs, etc. would seem to harken back to these old sagas, and are not to be taken very seriously (although Pete also got into it with his neighbor to the east, José Rodriguez Jr., about many other matters, and this degenerated into name-calling worthy of a couple 5 year olds.... ah the good old days!).

I personallly like both hard and vac-form - how's that for a wishy-washy attitude??? (but with a preference for the vac-forms, especially in 1/24, as a survivor of the golden era...)
Don
 

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Premium Member
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5,676 Posts
Snob. Yep, that's me alrighty! I know what I like, I know what I dislike and I don't mind sharing the information with the rest of you, dear readers, the great unwashed.


Although I don't mean to sound superior about it, I just like to point out something is carp when, in my humble opinion, something is carp.


I guess that isn't actually snobbery, just bloodymindedness. Yeah, and sometimes, sometimes, I put on airs and graces and use flowery language to wind you all up.

Looking forward to another good year on SF.
 

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Dennis Samson
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807 Posts
I think a lot depends on how you define yourself in our hobby.

If you are primarily a racer who likes good-looking cars (like I am), then well-presented vacuum-formed bodies are the way to go. Whether you paint them on the inside or the outside is a strategic decision based on the quality of the shell and the visual effect you are looking for.

If you are a modeller who likes cars that work as opposed to ones that decorate a shelf, then glass fiber or resin or plastic shells can provide the extra level of detail that you are looking for.

It is entirely possible to be both of course, just as it is entirely possible to create the most ghastly-looking models from resin, glass fiber or plastic shells, and just as it is entirely possible to produce exquisite models from vacuum-formed shells, as has been more than adequately demonstrated by Russell and others.

I think that there are many highly detailed vacuum-formed shells available (for example the jewels from TrueScale Products), just as there are "blobs" of resin or high-impact "Tupperware" available too.
 
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