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GOGS...Grumpy Old Gits Society..

332350 Views 8266 Replies 133 Participants Last post by  StuBeeDoo
after all the years of suffering being called a miserable old bar-steward by mrs zz , I am finally rejoicing that she has come round to my way of thinking. the source of this wonderment?... a newly found joint loathing of the foul phenomenon of otherwise seemingly intelligent individuals starting a sentence with the word "so"!!!! if you have been asked , "how do you propose to re-attach that button"? , or , "what method would you use to distribute seed in your garden" , fair enough but otherwise , nooooooooooo! other current hot favourites are "yoofs" with their kecks hanging out the top of their trousers and newly qualified drivers with a green p plate (clearly designating pillock) who refuse to commit to crossing a roundabout without having received a written invitation at least a fortnight in advance! what gets your hackles up?
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Interesting topic, this. I have a small collection of original works, a few of my own and the balance by respected but essentially unknown artists. I don't have room to display them all so there is some rotation. The value of the collection is insignificant but the pleasure I derive from looking at them on a daily basis is hard to overstate. They are not "background" or "decorating" but rather part and parcel of my everyday life.

EM
Rotation seems a good idea. I have a few of my pics and drawings around along with a few prints. My problems is that whilst I take great care about colours, finish, design etc., the sad fact is that most things disappear into the woodwork and I find that we cease to be aware of them. The danger is that they do just become part of the background and all those tiny imperfections that bothered me so much when I was doing the decoration fade away and are never noticed.

Ronnie says they are not noticeable anyway but to me, at least when doing them, they scream out that I'm a careless twit, do it again!

I have my guitars and woodturnings on display as well but they too are only looked at properly very occasionally, normally when dusting and polishing.

Maybe an empty white room would do the job after all.
This is why the garden or landscape is so good , it's forever changing and we can see something different every day ( this is not sounding grumpy enough) !
Bought a new house in 88 and supplied the paint as the builder specced totally magnolia, peppermint lounge, pale grey kitchen, pale blue bathroom etc, the builder wanted to charge me extra as a result of having to wash out brushes and rollers so much!!!.
Hi
It's not considered bland, currently working on finishing high end houses and it's all painted in you know what, the reason is it opens the rooms out and gives the appearance of more space, darker colours give the effect of drawing the walls in.
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Grant

Hi
It's not considered bland, currently working on finishing high end houses and it's all painted in you know what, the reason is it opens the rooms out and gives the appearance of more space, darker colours give the effect of drawing the walls in.
Granted. But 'considered' bland is up for interpretation.

However, if rooms in the UK were made a decent size that allowed a human scale living area, such subterfuge wouldn't be necessary.

Our 'snug' which as one might guess is the smallest living room in the house, is 5 metres by 4.5 metres. Colour in such a space is no problem.

This is the one thing that I find more than a bit offputting about returning to the UK. We are probably looking at a self build because of this. I'd rather have one big room than the rat cages on offer in houses we can afford.
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Hi

subterfuge oh yes
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when potential clients visit the site agent comes in and puts the coffee machine on , it's not for drinking
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but the paint scheme is not subterfuge, the kitchen alone has bigger foot print than out entire downstairs.
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Self build is a good option but you are at the mercy of the council planning department, our application took seven years!!! and we had to change the style, orientation to the road and the room uses/ positions as we were told we couldn't have a chimney in the middle, it had to be on the end of the roof, also as we were in conservation area in the middle of the village, it wasn't dealt with by committee but by the chief conservation officer under delegated powers, so you were up against personal opinion. It made anything I'd ever dealt with in industry seem simple and logical.
We do the same when possible buyers come round, maybe even bake a loaf too!

But that doesn't change the fact that it's the most boring non colour on earth
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Self build is a good option but you are at the mercy of the council planning department, our application took seven years!!! and we had to change the style, orientation to the road and the room uses/ positions as we were told we couldn't have a chimney in the middle, it had to be on the end of the roof, also as we were in conservation area in the middle of the village, it wasn't dealt with by committee but by the chief conservation officer under delegated powers, so you were up against personal opinion. It made anything I'd ever dealt with in industry seem simple and logical.
We are looking at a wooden frame house in Scotland or the Islands. The company that makes them seem to have the system sorted but we may see! The plots we have been looking at are pretty remote so we hope that the planning system is reasonably sympathetic.

I'm 71 now so I hope the house here sells before I get too old to cope.
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Hi

did suggest a bread making machine
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and the high asking price don't get you quality skirting or architrave, yep mdf all round and 7 inch with a bull nose
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You do get decent room space a excellent motorway access, the latter has probably added a few £££...
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Whilst I'm having a whinge about decoration.....paint!! Not just colour but quality. I understand and approve of the move to water based paint but surely it's not beyond the capability of the paint scientists to make water based gloss.

Went to buy some white paint to finish the skirting in Ronnie's sewing room yesterday. What do they have? Satin, satin, satin and satin. Shades of Python come to mind.

Satin, like Magnolia, is just another cop out. It's dead easy to get a reasonable finish and satin, almost as much as matt, hides imperfections nicely. It takes skill to put on a good coat of gloss with no brushmarks (don't like rollers). Satin also softens the colour. If I use white on woodwork, I want it to be crisp...and shiny. Had to buy some exterior grade for metal finishing. Even that is really only semi gloss.

I used some varnish on the floor in the bathroom. On the tin it said "brilliant". Well it wasn't actually very good and it wasn't very shiny either
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! Gloss has become satin and satin almost matt.

Whilst oil has it's disadvantages, some of the price we pay for trying to avoid using it is a bit high. OK, I know in the great scheme of things, decoration doesn't exactly sit up there with global warming and the population explosion but to someone like me whose working life has revolved around design and decoration and artistic endeavours in general, it's very frustrating to see the reduction in quality.

I guess once my generation is gone, the new norm will mean less whinging on about this particular subject. My parents went on about manners, etiquete, belief in the hereafter and the importance of being white and middle class.

Everything must change.
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If I use white on woodwork, I want it to be crisp...and shiny.
Most definitely!
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I love the way varnishes bring out the grain and knots in woodwork, but there are places for it. Skirtings and architraves are not that place.

...........And panelled doors painted the same colour as adjacent walls.........? What on earth is that all about???
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Most definitely!
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I love the way varnishes bring out the grain and knots in woodwork, but there are places for it. Skirtings and architraves are not that place.

...........And panelled doors painted the same colour as adjacent walls.........? What on earth is that all about???
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er....blandness
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Quite agree about paint quality! "Back in the day" I could "hang" an even coat of alkyd enamel with a good brush and have it dry to a smooth, glossy finish.. The best of current acrylic enamels can't match it nor do the flats dry to the same "velvet-like" finish that one could achieve with an alkyd flat.

One trick I picked up during my dinghy racing days when painting was an annual affair: I used an alkyd marine enamel. Painting was a two-handed affair - a foam roller in one hand to deliver paint quickly and a brush in the other to "tip off" the slightly pebbled surface left by the roller. This allowed me to maintain a "wet edge" while painting the (inverted) hull of a 17' dinghy. Of course, the area below the water line was sanded flat after drying - a wettable surface is faster. Other sailors in the club assumed that I had trucked the hull to an auto body shop to be sprayed.

EM
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I like the roller and brush idea.

When doing kitchens in MDF I always sprayed them but if touching up or awkward bits after construction were involved, I would challenge anyone to see the brushwork. Not sure that would be the case now.

Interesting that the hull would be faster after sanding. Such things wouldn't normally cross my consciousness
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The island unit has sprayed doors, all the rest is brushed.

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You are missing at least 6 bottles of wine Gordon... pitiful... :-D
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You are missing at least 6 bottles of wine Gordon... pitiful... :-D
After paying me for that, it was all she could afford
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