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Peter Seager-Thomas
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1,216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another of George Turners little gems. More often modelled in the form with the fuel tanks faired in, George has opted for the version with unfaired tanks and surprisingly, stacked exhausts rather than the more usual close packed group.



The car, I am told, is based on the 1956 Argentine GP car of Fangio, though a look at various pictures shows a similar car at Monaco that year, presumably the one driven by Fangio again.



As usual, the kit comes with a resin chassis, not the GTM adjustable type, but a fixed wheelbase version made to take an FF motor and presumably Slot-It running gear.



It is being prepped for a winter build, but might be done before then...

Peter.
 

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Slot Car Racer and Builder
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1,742 Posts
Thanks Peter

I will follow this with interest, I am about to order one from George

Your photo shows the detail even better than on George's website - I am really looking forward to making mine now.

cheers
David
 

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Tony Condon
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3,044 Posts
Hi Peter
nice project ,but i think its already winter
I blame the discovery of the higgs boson particle

Cheers tony
 

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1,632 Posts
Peter - as a 1956 car it should correctly be called Lancia-Ferrari D50.

But it is still a very nice model


/Holger
 

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79 Posts
I like George's models, and would like to purchase a few, but alas he does not take PayPal, so I'll have to admire them on the forums.
 

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Slot Car Racer and Builder
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George takes paypal, just bought 3 kits from him.

Send him an email and let him know what you want. He will send an invoice.

cheers
David
 

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Peter Farrell
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2,114 Posts
I'm no expert on the Lancia D50 and I didn't know that they were still using the seperate side tanks after 1955. I thought that after Ferrari took them over in 55, during the off season they converted them to the faired in side tanks.
Peter
 

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Premium Member
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QUOTE (alfetta @ 11 Jul 2012, 12:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm no expert on the Lancia D50 and I didn't know that they were still using the seperate side tanks after 1955. I thought that after Ferrari took them over in 55, during the off season they converted them to the faired in side tanks.
Peter

Best picture I could find:



The Argentine GP was on January 20-22 so there wouldn't have been much of an off-season for development. I'm not sure if it was the first race with the cars under Scuderia Ferrari, but Mike Hawthorn drove a D50 with separate panniers at the 1955 Oulton Park Gold Cup... often been tempted to build my MacP example as that one.
 

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Peter Farrell
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2,114 Posts
QUOTE (driver#8 @ 11 Jul 2012, 14:29) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Best picture I could find:



The Argentine GP was on January 20-22 so there wouldn't have been much of an off-season for development. I'm not sure if it was the first race with the cars under Scuderia Ferrari, but Mike Hawthorn drove a D50 with separate panniers at the 1955 Oulton Park Gold Cup... often been tempted to build my MacP example as that one.

Thanks for the info.
 

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Driver #8 - Oulton Park Gold Cup was not the first appearance of the Ferrari-Lancia D50.

The Lancia-Ferrari D50 first entered motor sport history at the Italian GP on Monza September 11, 1955.

According to many sources the Scuderia Ferrari brought seven cars in total with them to Monza along with six drivers.

Three original Ferrari 555 Supersqualos (+ a spare) and three D50s.

#0 Lancia-Ferrari D50 - Eugenio Castellotti
#2 Lancia-Ferrari D50 - Dr. Guiseppe Farina
#4 Ferrari 555 - spare car/Eugenio Castellotti
#6 Ferrari 555 - Mike Hawthorn
#8 Ferrari 555 - Maurice Trintignant
#10 Lancia-Ferrari D50 - Luigi Villoresi
#12 Ferrari 555 - Umberto Maglioli

The story of how the D50s threw several treads on their Englebert tyres on the new bankings on the Monza circuit during practise, so they were forced to withdraw since the contract to the Belgian concern didn´t allow a switch of tyres, is well known.

So Dr. Farina and Luigi Villoresi ended up as non-starters and Eugenio Castellotti was given the old spare F555 for the race. Eugenio started the race from second row from a time sat in the D50 during practise, but nobody gave a dam. It was, after all, on Monza! He drove a fine race and ended third after two of the all conquering Mercedes W196s.

It is also well known, that Mike Hawthorn, disliking the new banking curves - and the F555, like a real gentleman offered his drive to both Dr. Farina and Villoresi. They both preferred to watch the race as spectators, so Hawthorn had to start.

/Holger
 

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Jon Grainger
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3,825 Posts
Hi guys,

Whilst I am no expert, I was today watching the season review of the 1956 Season, shown at the weekend on Sky Sports F1. The first race of the season was indeed held "in the Argentine", and all the three factory Ferrari's featured the pannier tanks.

At Monaco, as far as I can see, the Castellotti and Musso car had pannier tanks, and #20 driven by Fangio and then later Castellotti, and also the #26 car driven by Collins and Fangio had faired in tanks.

At Spa, they entered another four cars, Numbers 2, 4, 6 and 8. I know that #2, 6 and 8 all had faired tanks, making me 99% sure that the #4 Castellotti car had the faired tanks too

Reims- cars were numbered 10, 12, 14 and 16. All cars had the faired tanks, with the #16 car driven by de Portago had an 'aerodynamic' front nose, similar to the Buggati that made it's debut there.

Silverstone, again four cars, Numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4. All cars featured faired tanks

Germany, 5 cars, Numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. All cars had the faired in tanks

Monza, 6 cars, Numbers 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and 50 (which did not start). All cars featured the pannier tanks.

Hope thats of some use to you,
 

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A great set of photos in the Life magazine piece, Peter.
There are a couple of errors in the captions. The #24 car was Musso's, forced into the straw bales when Fangio spun #20 on lap 2.
Fangio launched an unusually aggressive recovery drive and hit a wall, damaging his rear suspension. He then took over #26 from Peter Collins and finished a close second to Moss (Maserati). The damaged #20 was not retired; Castellotti got in and wrestled it to 4th.
According to Alan Henry in Ferrari: The Grand Prix Cars (1984), two of the five cars Ferrari took to Monaco, for four drivers, still had the separate side-pods. The Collins-Fangio #26 may have been one of them. See the Life photo of it passing the pits. If so, George Turner's great shell could house Fangio in what he's reported as calling "possibly my greatest drive ... perhaps even better than the Nurburgring in 1957".

The change to faired-in bodywork was piecemeal early in 1956. The first such car appeared in the Syracuse GP on April 15 (one of four taken there). All cars had it by the Belgian GP in June.
Henry doesn't mention any reversion to separate panniers, and in a photo of the famous (or infamous) Castellotti-Musso duel at Monza both cars seem to have full-width bodywork.

The side-exiting exhausts first appeared on two of the three cars taken to Argentina in January, #30 & 34. They had a large tail fuel tank and only a small reserve supply in one or both panniers. Fangio started in #30 but a fuel line or pump failed and he took over Musso's #34, which is what most photos show him driving to victory.
Rob J
 

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Another photo of the Collins-Fangio #26 D50 at Monaco, in Great Marques: Ferrari, tends to confirm that it had separate panniers or pontoons. However, the exhaust outlets seem to be what Peter called the close-packed group, and different from those on the GTM Argentine GP shell.
Rob J
 
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