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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some help picking a chassis design. I would like to build a chassis for a 1/32 NASCAR. Do I build Torsion Bar Chassis, Pan or one that you guys think would be better. I really enjoyed reading Larry Geddes Chassis theory. All I can think about is building a chassis.

Thanks



Tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey Al,

Is the rear end of the chassis flexible enough to allow the inner tire to slip, & "plant" the outer tire? Reading Larry's article mentioned "To allow the rear of the chassis to twist easily, a "spine" pivot on the longitudinal centerline is used."

Tony
 

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Hi Tony

Any of the chassis that you mentioned will work fine..... The torsion bar chassis I make is a good deal more work to build.... But not that hard...... Al's chassis is also a good design.... I have make a couple like that..... They pans are allow the body to float and it isolates the body from the main chassis frame....

And it should be a good handling chassis.... The other nice thing about chassis like this is that they are fairly easy for a new builder to do....

Then pan chassis will also work well..... in my experiance the anglewinder pan chassis will give better performance over the inline..... But again you want to have you body floating to some extent to isolate the body from the chassis....

I have found with the body tightened down on the chassis you can tend to get some wheel hop out of the chassis.... And this will slow you down coming out of the turns......

What type of track are you building for?? Wood (routed) or plastic??

If you are new at this then I would start simple and then move on from there as your skills improve......

Chris.
 

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QUOTE Is the rear end of the chassis flexible enough to allow the inner tire to slip, & "plant" the outer tire? Reading Larry's article mentioned "To allow the rear of the chassis to twist easily, a "spine" pivot on the longitudinal centerline is used."
Er,don't know.All I know is the thing is a Bullet on both Commercial raceway tracks and my Vintage Revell home track.

The front wheels support the full weight of the front end of the Car/Chassis,and the guide only,well,guides.

There is a small amount of controlled movement in the front axle assembly,which probably does the same as Larry's "pivoting Spine" thingy.

It doesn't matter what you build,if you jam enough motor in it and can get it to Hook up,it will be fast.
 
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