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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, so now you all think I'm crazy.
Hornby Warts. C912
PRI 230V ~ 50Hz
SEC 16V ~ 13VA

If ~ = AC, then I understand.

I have a car rigged with a diode on the + side of the motor. I have just removed the PCB plug from the main board on a Hornby power track. Connected two wires to the connectors, and the wires to my track. (Pucker) Plugged the Wart into the SKT, put a car on the rails, and it just does not know which way to go. Place the Diode car on the rails, she runs both ways. Put a MM across the rails and I get 15V AC. So the PCB in the power track is converting AC to DC.
How mad is that. Why do Hornby sell an AC adaptor to run DC cars. The cost of the power track could be cheaper, if it was not for a converter in there.

OH, why am I playing with this.
Story. Our home track did have the Hornby set-up. but I thought as I have a Computer PSU, 400W I would use that instead and get the volts down to 12V. Wired it up to the norm.
12V is OK, but this PSU only puts out 11.51V. cars go well, but not as good as 16V. so decided to go back to 16V Hornby Wart thingys. As the Computer PSU is connected to the track via connectors. Simple to just connect the wart to replace the PSU. Save having to rewire the track for the Hornby Power board.
So I did that, and that's how I figured out the Hornby warts are AC power. Came as a VERY BIG Surprise.

So, now do I rewire the track to take the Hornby MB and warts, DC?, fit Diodes to all my cars, and just use the warts, cars run both ways?, revert back to the Computer PSU, 12 boring Volts?
As I'm planning to build an AC2Car track soon, then I have the power packs for that. Saves me going out and finding AC Transformers.

Andy
 

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Wow! Just found out the same thing as you did, in the same way!! Hehe:)

Tip: as long as you only have one car per lane, you don't need diodes on the cars. Check the elctrical section on ac2car.org, and rig up the power supply with one controller on each lane. You must have the diodes in the same direction, since you want them to run in the same direction


Tip2: I'm on thin ice here, but I think 19v AC, wired with diodes, outputs the half in area the car operates. AC is like a sine-curve, and the car only operates in half the area, thus using only half the current and voltage. It surely didn't feel like 19v when I tested this yesterday...

The best solution I have found is using a variable dc power supply, an arduino chip w/ h-bridge to simulate "AC", and bang a good AC-setup! The best reason for doing this is that I can adjust the frequency to 100hz, eliminating the AC-noise you probably heard when running at 50/60hz.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (las^se @ 29 Aug 2011, 23:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Wow! Just found out the same thing as you did, in the same way!! Hehe:)

Tip: as long as you only have one car per lane, you don't need diodes on the cars. Check the elctrical section on ac2car.org, and rig up the power supply with one controller on each lane. You must have the diodes in the same direction, since you want them to run in the same direction


Tip2: I'm on thin ice here, but I think 19v AC, wired with diodes, outputs the half in area the car operates. AC is like a sine-curve, and the car only operates in half the area, thus using only half the current and voltage. It surely didn't feel like 19v when I tested this yesterday...

The best solution I have found is using a variable dc power supply, an arduino chip w/ h-bridge to simulate "AC", and bang a good AC-setup! The best reason for doing this is that I can adjust the frequency to 100hz, eliminating the AC-noise you probably heard when running at 50/60hz.

Yes, I'm with you on all the above. But, the wart only outputs 16vac, so that's going to give you 8v to drive the each car. Way to little. you need at least 24VAC power unit. to give you 12V per car.
Diodes. They block the negative wave. As long as the controller wiring is the same for both. Then the diodes would need to be opposite each other. ie. one controller getting the + sine, the other the - sine. Not to sure if the cars would need diodes though, under these condition's. One car per lane. eg. Lane 1 has the +V, Lane 2 the -V

Are you think like this? Arduino chip w/h-bridge
 

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I have the following hardware for running any analog track on AC.

- Similar to the Arduino Uno SMD
- H-bridge/Motor driver that handles up to 9A at 16V (I think...) Better spec if I put on a heatsink.
- I got the arduino programming from AC2CAR's own Bryan T.

The arduino setup doubles the DC input voltage, thus what DC voltage you set at the variable power supply, is the same you get at the track in AC.

I measured the Hornby C988 I have, which also specs 16v ~ 13VA @ 19VAC.
You only need to have a +diode -diode setup if you are going to drive two cars on the same lane. Then you need to do the same in the cars. If you only are going to drive one car per lane, it's only necessary to have a diode in the controller wiring. If you have a +diode on one lane, and a -diode, and you don't have a reversing switch, you will need to wire one lane for running clockwise, and the other for running counterclockwise.

I have run a 2 lane analog track without diodes in the car. It works
Without diodes in the controller wiring the car only make a noise...
 

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Thanks for getting back to me on this, "Power track connector" do you mean the piece of track that connects to a DSCX as that only outputs DC, I want AC for the AC2car system, so just wanna know if you think these warts will power it directly.

forgive my ignorance as I'm only just getting into this after building my first DC powered routed track setup, but that was a bit pants as I did not use a guide for the routing the corners , freehand routing is not recommended!!! lol

My sons got their room back also, so its all going in the dining room, she as in the wife will not move me from there. I hope
 
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