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DT
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My track is in a room above my garage. Although insulated, it has an unfinished wall leading on to a non-insulated section of the garage. So when it gets hot outside, the track room warms up. This has led to some buckling of the track. I had pinned and siliconed most of the track when I built it, but these sections were floating.





Here I've added more silicone in big blobs under the track and placed some weight on top. I hope that it's ready for the 24 hours tomorrow.

 

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not nice!
Is it scaly sport track?

By the way - looking at the black tyre marks on the track, it looks like you need a swiffer car too!!!

Hope the silicon holds it, good luck
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Oh sure, Astro, Nuro is hurting and you are plugging yer Swiffer!


Had that prob with HO track until it was screwed down! Temp and humidity changes play havoc with plastic track! Sorry to see that, Nuro!
And I'm not sure how easy that would be to cure without some serious adhesives - I hope the silicone holds!


Astro will probably next recommend Pajeros or something.....
 

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Our Classic track was like that at every join because we pinned it down.
Pheonix is the same, buckled.

Track at the club has been layed down and only pinned in a couple of places.

Inte
 

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The trick is to not pin it AT ALL!!!

This is how Eastcote was built and it's the smoothest and flatest plexi that I have ever driven on.

Lotus
 

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I love it when the English talk about heat. Like us Aussie's complaining about the 12deg celcuis as freezing and Rugby players who keep confusing the game with soccer and quick the ball all the time..

When I built my track about 15 years ago, it came from a semi permanent setup in an upstairs uninsulated bedroom ( which probably in Summer months got somewhere near 40C, to a downstairs cavity brick room which always remained comfortable. We have moved know onto a larger property and now the track is in a large tin shed ( 8 cars size) and I measured the temp one day last year and it was 49C inside. So some buckling. and I dont think a couple of pins hurts much. Just dont use big ones.

I think sometimes we are all guilty of putting our borders or scenery in to tight and the track cant move. It seems to come back to the weakest part or the part where movement is under the most pressure and boink! up she goes. SoI'm not really stating anything new.

maybe if I've learned anything here, its best to build any permanent tracks at the height of summer when everything has grown to its max and then cut our boarders and even then allow for some small movement as well. And remember whenever your working and using lots of powertools its important to keep yourself hydrated.
 

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I am an aussie and have the same problem. High 40's in my garage in summer and zero in winter mornings.

I have to tack down my track so it can be leant against a wall in my garage to fit my car in. I thought I had it right this time but now it is winter here again and the Scalextric classic section of main straight which is 5 metres long is pushing the locating tabs under the track and causing the tabs to make bumps in the straight.

It is only happening on the straight so I may use sport for the longer straights now.
 

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Gary Skipp
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I get track buckling and my sport track is simply put together and lauyed onto carpoet for a temporary layout.

I would have thought fixing the track would solve this.
 

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Ooh, dear. Looks kinda like the old hump on the Mulsanne...except that wasn't immediately prior to a corner... and didn't go into a tunnel... but apart from that, it looks like the old hump on the Mulsanne.

Lotus, what did you use then? Voodoo?

QUOTE And remember whenever your working and using lots of powertools its important to keep yourself hydrated.

Aussie to the core!
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Apparently, judging by the differences of opinions, it may come down to the characteristics of the specific track plastic. I know that I never had problems with track that was screwed down, though it would buckle and heave like crazy if not firmly anchored. That was Aurora track, though, which is a fairly rigid plastic. Every single piece of my permanent 50 foot track (still in use after 23 years, tho not mine anymore) was held down with at least 2 screws per section.

The type of problem exhibited in Nuro's pics simply can't happen if all pieces are firmly secured. I'm not sure how practical that is with 1/32 track though. Even on the HO stuff I sometimes had to glue short pieces of plastic tube to the underside, as bosses, before drilling and countersinking the surface for screws. A lot of work, and sounds nasty, but when the screw heads are painted they almost disappear. It was well worth the effort, IMO.

Then again..... this is one reason I rout now....


QUOTE Lotus, what did you use then? Voodoo?

Simple, really, Wankel! They steam-iron the track before they use it!
 

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QUOTE Then again..... this is one reason I rout now....
When I had a routed track in the attic I still had problems with expansion/contraction of the copper conductor strips. I would guess braid is better in that respect?
 

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Brian Ferguson
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Absolutely John. Copper tape can lift and buckle, looking just like the heaves on Nuro's track sections. Usually repaired just by burnishing them back down - a wallpaper seam roller works quite well. Braid does not exhibit this trait because of it's woven construction.
 

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QUOTE Lotus, what did you use then? Voodoo?

Yes. That and the power of GRAVITY to hold it to the boards.

We have a huge wooden track, like tailor made tables which follow the circuit perfectly. We then laid the connected Ninco track on top, and..... started racing.

Interesting fact: Our track is 130 foot long and power reaches the rails at one point only. No booster cables whatever. And I defy anyone to find a low power spot.

I will draw a picture if you guys can't understand this. If you have a piece of string 30cm long, and clamp it to each end of a 30cm ruler. It will be tight and flat.

Now take a 32cm piece of string and clamp it to the same ruler at each end. I know it's a bit exagerated, but the extra 2cm is supposed to represent expansion. Notice how the string is loose and when laid flat, provides bump(s) so that the 32cm can be squeezed into the 30cm space.

Now take the 32cm string and begin to lay it 1cm past the the begining of the ruler, and continue laying it straight up until 1cm past the end of the ruler. Notice the straightness of this piece of string compared to the one which was clamped (nailed down).

You get my point. So long as none of it is tacked down, it will not buckel.

This is all assuming of course that the base boards are not made of a material with the same rate of expansion as the track. Hmmm.... that would be cool...

Lotus
 

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Brian Ferguson
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I think both approaches to this are totally correct.

With no tack points, obviously the entire track can expand and contract and won't buckle. It can freely change in shape without causing those nasty heaves.

With the track tacked down at every possible point (both sides of every join) then again the track will not buckle because the expansion forces are restrained. Just because an object wants to expand doesn't mean it will if it is held by a greater force.

But it is an ALL OR NOTHING situation. Do it everywhere, or not at all. If done only in certain places, then the track will "pop up" in locations that are not secured. And, if you secure the track, it must be done with a very positive method, one that will resist the forces of expansion and contraction. And, as I said before, I'm not sure how practical this is with 1/32 plastic track - it's beyond my scope of experience.

On my HO course, which had significant elevation changes, it was critical that the track be firmly attached, since otherwise it would not have sat correctly at all!

As usual, several sides to every story!
 
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