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Hello

Could someone please explain in an exact way how to break in a motor under water/oil.

I have been told you can break motors in under both??

Do I submerge all the motor including wires?

What voltage should I run while under water/oil

How about 3 mins in water, 30 secs in wd-40, 3 mins spinning dry to dry off, all at 3v????

Any info appreciated.

Thanks
 

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I normally run them dry at about 3v for half hour or so.

Then drop of oil on the bearings before doing 15 minutes on a PP3 (9V battery).

But dont tell Mr M!!!!
 

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The only motor that I bother to break in is the SCX RX motors.

I oil it up, drop in some comm drops then run them on 13.8v, 7amps for about 30mins, re-oil and re-comm drop and let it cool down. Then another 30mins, re-fluid and dry off.

Some people say that running in at such high voltage is bad for the motor, but I tend to have some of the quicker motors at my club.

All Ninco motors just get glued straight in, as they don't seriously improve until the are raced IMO.

Really, I don't think it matters massively what you do, so long as it has some running before you race it hard. You can run them under water or oil, but it just makes a mess, and they tend to blow up a bit quicker IME.

McLaren
 

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Allan Wakefield
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Almost the same as Daleq for me - half hour at 3V, clean, half hour at 6 v, clean half hour at 9 then clean and off onto the track. I also add toothpaste ( the cheap and nasty powdery stuff) to the gearing to bed them in during this time.

I do all motors like this but dont see the point or advantage of sinking them in distilled water or oil.
 

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I have just tired the water break in.... I put the whole motor in a tub of water and ran it for 4 mnis at 4 volts..... bad idea..... this was a 16d motor and I ended up with over HALF the brushes being gone
and a 16d has a lot more brush material than the throw a way motors that come on the 1/32 cars.... to much time in the water and you will end up with no brushes.....

So I replaced the brushes with new ones and only did the break in for 30 seconds..

that worked fine..... blow the motor out good to dry and then oil....

Chris
 

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Anthony Bartlett
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Chris

Let us know if you see a difference in performance on the track.....

At one stage there was a fad in South Africa where NC1/2 were half filled via the screw holes, with baby oil and then run in - no conclusive evidence that this actually improved performance....
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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A tiny drop of thin oil at each rotor point then just run them dry on a 9v battery for 3 or 4 minutes. There's no point wearing the motor out with 30 minute run in periods when you could be enjoying racing with it in the car.

Or take the easy route! Tiny drop of thin oil at each rotor point and just run them in gently in the car for 1000feet on your track.

Why make life difficult
 

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Over the top? You decide.

I oil the thing and then run it for an hour or so at low, low, bearly turning volts.

Then I up the ante a wee notch.

Then I oil her up again with another drop of Trinity Royal Oil.

Then I give her full chat with a Carrera 1:24 transformer for an hour or so.

Then I strap the motor back in the chassis and give it large with the gears and axle in place.

Then I take it to the track and some muppet who claims, "It's brand new. I only took it out of the box when I got here", **** my sorry ass.

 

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Ninco motors only - mainly NC2 - not so good with others.

Leave in chassis with rear axle attached. Parmalube the crownwheel and contrate.

Using regulated variable power supply - 12 hours (yes 12!) at 6v. Oil bearings.

Then 12 hours at 9v. Oil again.

Then 12 Hours at 12v.

Finally - 30 secs at 12v while squirting some switch cleaner into the motor.

Got this from a tuning article on Pendle's website. Sounds crazy but it works. I did my Audi TT like this and it flies. 18 months use from the motor and still going strong.

By running in the gearing at the same time it also produces a smooth quiet mesh.

Don't try it with Scalextric motors - they won't survive the first session!

Brian
 

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Sheesh!

I am not worthy.

I doff my hat to the King of Over the Top!


One thing, what power supply are you using? I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my elastic band holding the throttle down for twelve hours for fear of it overheating (the throttle, not the elastic band
) - I trashed several old style Scaley ones doing that for a lot less than twelve hours.

And, sorry if this is a numb-nut question but why does the volts matter? I thought I had picked up from this forum that it is current that is really King?

Or have I really picked up nothing from this forum?
 

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"Let us know if you see a difference in performance on the track.....

At one stage there was a fad in South Africa where NC1/2 were half filled via the screw holes, with baby oil and then run in - no conclusive evidence that this actually improved performance.... "

Tony, yes the break in helps..... is it a lot?? not really sure, but you can see the difference with a stock unbroken in motor compaired to a broken in motor..

-------------------------------------

"One thing, what power supply are you using? I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my elastic band holding the throttle down for twelve hours for fear of it overheating (the throttle, not the elastic band ) - I trashed several old style Scaley ones doing that for a lot less than twelve hours.

And, sorry if this is a numb-nut question but why does the volts matter? I thought I had picked up from this forum that it is current that is really King?"

Ickx

I use a Loko 400 var. supply.... 4 to 18 volt, 20 amps........

For the motor hook up the Loko has several power outlets... I just hook up 2 wires to one and then use alligator clips and attach them to the lead wires....

the volts dictate the RPMs of the motor...... now I dont know the exact numbers but lets say that at 4 volt the motor is turning 4,000 rpms..... at 6 is might be turning 10,000 rpm.. and at 13.5 ( what I run my track at ) it's turning 18,000 for say a NC1...... now keep in mind the numbers are just made up for a example but that's basicly how it work with volts..

Chris
 

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Wankel, Your confusion may be that a car may run faster on a power supply with lower voltage, but higher amperage, because the stock power supplies do not supply as much amperage as the cars will draw at full throttle, even though they have relatively high voltage. This is especially true for magnet cars which put a higher load on the motor. The amp draw is directly proportional to the load on the motor. When breaking in motors, they are usually run with no load, so they will not draw much amperage at all and the rpm is dictated by voltage. Hope this makes some sense.
 

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Does it matter which way you hook up the wires to the power supply to break in the motor?
In other words: does it have to be broken in the way the motor turns on the track or it is actually a good idea to run it in both directions?
Thanks
Best regards
Edo
 

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Brian Ferguson
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LS is correct. With perhaps one caveat (mentioned later for under-water break in).

First of all, the run in time is only intended to seat the brushes to the comm. Not wear them beyond the point where they have fully contoured to the shape of the revolving copper mass between them.

No offense to the long-term break-in guys, but running in a motor for more than minutes is only contributing to premature wear of the brushes and also the comm, regardless of the motor involved. Once the brushes have fully seated, there is no other part of the motor that needs to be "broken in". There is only ONE moving part with only TWO objects that ride against it. And if the comm is out of round, no amount of "break-in" will help since the brushes are softer than the comm and will not "make it round".

The reason for "seating" the brushes is to reduce (you cannot eliminate it) the arcing between brushes and comm that result in "pitting" of the comm surface. This occurs most prevalently when the brush faces are not contoured to the same curve as the comm.

This is best done by running the motor at slow RPM until the brushes adapt fully to the contour of the comm. I have yet to see any motor, including full-race strap motors, that need more than 30 minutes, even with high-silver brushes (yech!) to accomplish this. The brushes in a typical RTR motor, being of a soft compound, are fully seated in 10 minutes or less at low RPM.

I break-in motor brushes at the slowest speed possible. If the motor rotates at 3V then that's what I use. If it needs 5-6V, then fine. I oil the bearings/bushings before running the motor in, and again after - very sparingly.

I have used the under-water approach. The benefit to it is speed. Under water, the cavitation action literally erodes the brushes at a much faster rate. If minutes are good for dry break-in, then seconds are good for under water. But this is where I will use reverse voltage - just for the first few seconds (maybe 10-20), then the remainder of the time (maybe 30-60) with normal forward voltage. Why? Because this method can eat away at the trailing edge of the brush faster than anywhere else - that is where the cavitation is greatest. By reversing direction, the effect is minimized, though you still want the brushes seated in the normal rotation direction when finished.

With today's disposable motors, I only use dry break-in, and only for a few minutes. Anything more severe, and you are really doing nothing but wearing the motor out. Run it in for a few minutes, then drive it on track for a few slow laps, then have at it!

I also NEVER use "tuner cleaner" sprays to "blow out" a motor - the temperature change can distort the shape of comms or stacks, or even crack the insulation on windings if used to the extreme. Comm drops are okay, and recommended, especially on motors that can't be easily disassembled for manual cleaning.

JMO, as always.
 

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QUOTE (Fergy @ 2 Dec 2004, 20:12)I also NEVER use "tuner cleaner" sprays to "blow out" a motor - the temperature change can distort the shape of comms or stacks, or even crack the insulation on windings if used to the extreme
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

... so my practice of truing tyres till the motor is glowing red hot, and then liberally coating it in freezer spray, then repeating, is a bad idea?
 

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Brian Ferguson
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QUOTE so my practice of truing tyres till the motor is glowing red hot, and then liberally coating it in freezer spray, then repeating, is a bad idea?

Not if you are racing against me!
 

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Thanks guys! This is a very interesting thread!
I usually break in some new motors at 3 volts for 3 minutes in a liquid that is especially sold for that in Italy. They wont say what it is (secret!) but after the 3 minutes it becomes dark grey, you blow the motor gently with some canned air and you are supposed to let the motor rest for a day before you use it. The producer actually recommends 3 minutes at 3 volts and 3 min. at 6 volts. But it seems to be too much to me. You can reuse it many times and it evaporates if not sealed well (they say).
It smells like wd40 or tiger's milk or voodoo, that kind of stuff...
What could it be? Petroleum based?
But more important could it ruin the motors once they are treated with it ?
I am asking because I would like to use it for my vintage motors but since I do not know what it really is ...
Best regards
Edo
 

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&#8230;..or one can just simply take out their new "baby" and let it "fly" around once track for a few gently laps. And as a result one does not only get the engine braked in, but also pinions and such. The advantage of this simple approach is that one does not risk burning the engine.

This works fine for me&#8230;sometimes one should keep it simple. or am i missing something here?


Eric
 

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Hi all; as Edo said, I too have used here in Italy a fluid sold by "MB"; my first impressions are positive. First I have made a rpm reading at 12v of a used Fly motor; it turned 18900 rpm; soon after I have fully immersed the motor in the fluid and run it at 4v for 5 minutes; then for 10 seconds backwards. The final reading was 22100 rpm. I don't know if this will last or if I have broken the motor; until now I have used it for two hours and it goes well.
Other Fly motors, all used, have shown all a gain in rpm after the bath, albeit not so high.
I will soon try the fluid for break-in.

P.
 
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