SlotForum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I have just tired the water break in.... I put the whole motor in a tub of water and ran it for 4 mnis at 4 volts..... bad idea..... this was a 16d motor and I ended up with over HALF the brushes being gone
and a 16d has a lot more brush material than the throw a way motors that come on the 1/32 cars.... to much time in the water and you will end up with no brushes.....

So I replaced the brushes with new ones and only did the break in for 30 seconds..

that worked fine..... blow the motor out good to dry and then oil....

Chris
 

· Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
"Let us know if you see a difference in performance on the track.....

At one stage there was a fad in South Africa where NC1/2 were half filled via the screw holes, with baby oil and then run in - no conclusive evidence that this actually improved performance.... "

Tony, yes the break in helps..... is it a lot?? not really sure, but you can see the difference with a stock unbroken in motor compaired to a broken in motor..

-------------------------------------

"One thing, what power supply are you using? I wouldn't feel comfortable leaving my elastic band holding the throttle down for twelve hours for fear of it overheating (the throttle, not the elastic band ) - I trashed several old style Scaley ones doing that for a lot less than twelve hours.

And, sorry if this is a numb-nut question but why does the volts matter? I thought I had picked up from this forum that it is current that is really King?"

Ickx

I use a Loko 400 var. supply.... 4 to 18 volt, 20 amps........

For the motor hook up the Loko has several power outlets... I just hook up 2 wires to one and then use alligator clips and attach them to the lead wires....

the volts dictate the RPMs of the motor...... now I dont know the exact numbers but lets say that at 4 volt the motor is turning 4,000 rpms..... at 6 is might be turning 10,000 rpm.. and at 13.5 ( what I run my track at ) it's turning 18,000 for say a NC1...... now keep in mind the numbers are just made up for a example but that's basicly how it work with volts..

Chris
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top