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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When deciding to put Slot It gears in my Scalextric Camaro the wheels wouldn't fit under the arches. So I decided to purchase a kit of the car, and make this wide enough for the new tires.
First I used the "teaspoon" method to raise and widen the arches, but wasn't pleased with the appearance of this. To make it smother and a bit wider I used Humbrol Model Filler, and sanded this as I felt needed.
After this I tried to paint the car using Tamiya black in a spray can, but it the filler was showing under the paint (guess I should have used some sort of primer first
). I tried four light layers of paint, but gave up...
So I sanded the paint down, and used Humbrol grey paint as primer. I didn't bother driving to town for another box of Tamiya, so I bought a can of RCPaint from a local shop instead. Used this for 3 light layers, and then a thicker layer.
Even if the filler don't show now I am far from pleased with the result of my painting.

At least the decals from Radical Decals hide some of my shortcomings (sorry about the poor picture, it was taken with my mobile phone):


Although I've learned a lot while doing this, I need some advice for future projects like it.
- What sort of primer and paint do you recommend?
- Should I use a spray can or a brush (airbrush is not an option for me, I'm not that serious yet)?
- How many layers of paint?
- Where do you paint your cars? I've done this indoors, but the smell sticks for ages

- Any other hints or tips would be greatly appreciated!

Oh, and when not using a mask during the spray painting I got a good taste of the fumes
I won't be repeating that!
 

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As most automotive paints are acrylic based then you should be able to get almost any colour you desire which won't melt the plastic body.
Always use a primer! I tend towards a grey primer as it seems to be more neutral than the old red oxide colour. I'm not sure if you can get white primer too. Obviously, for the lighter colours you need a white undercoat, or else you would waste far too much paint trying to cover the grey.
You can go for the cheap and dirty, but still quite acceptable IMHO method of not using fine wet & dry sandpaper in between coats to flat the paint. It's up to you how much time you wish to lavish on your project.

I have had some good results just using spray cans, so you may want to stick with those for a bit longer before moving up to an airbrush (mixing paint/thinners ratios etc. and cleaning it out afterwards).

Hope this helps,
Mark.
 

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I would agree with Difflock, a primer of some sort is vital.

I myself use a white car primer from Halfords in the UK - comes in massive cans and doesn't cost the each, in the past I have used a grey version of the Halfords primer, but the white is better for all top coats. I've also used a Humberol primer but pound for pound Halfords is better.

Anyway I would say that if you want a nice top coat, the only really good way is an airbrush - they don't cost the earth and rather than buying a compressor, you can get cans of compressed 'Air' that do the job just as well.

The problem with car paint for a top coat is that the jet is too coarse as well as Tamiya RC paint - with an airbrush you can adjust the spray for whatever job you are doing.

Hope this has been of help.

Cheers

Mark
 

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I use Humbrol grey primer or undercoat with Custom Colour Polycarbonate White if the body colour is intended to be quite light. Games Workshop Black Primer for metallics.

For coats, do many but each one to be very light. If you really want to go for a concours finish then the best way is to lightly sand-down inbetween coats with a very fine grade of wet and dry paper.

Coop
 

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And after you have followed all the above great advice, You should consider buying a product called "Semi-Chrome" polish.

Use it to polish your car body to get a great smooth shine almost as if you had a clear coat on it.

Victor
 

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I just put mine in a bag and give it to someone else. Usually it comes back with a nice paint job on it.

When I have to do it myself, I just key up the body with a kitchen scouring pad, remove the decals with some white spirit and then cover it in several coats of Tamiya paint. I do a light coat at first, wait between 30 mins to 1 hour and then give it a couple more coats every couple of hours. Sometimes I put a fan heater on in the room where I let it dry, or just put it in a warm room. That's about it, no base coat, primer or laquer (too much added weight). All mine seem to be fine...

The ones I send off are to a mate who sprays for a living, Lambos, Beemers and the like. He uses a billion psi spraygun and coats it in primer, undercoat, basecoat, top coat, top coat, top coat, top coat, and drops the whole thing into a vat of laquer. They look awsome but are about 5 grams (or more) heavier so they only go onto cars which are more than 0.5 second faster than anyone elses
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Lotus
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the advice. I wasn't aware of the trick using sand paper between coats...

There isn't any clear coat on the Camaro yet, but I'll put Future floor wax on once I can find some.

There is a bloke down the street that paints 1:1 cars for a living, and he's helped me before with my car. I'll probably use him if I want a slotcar to look really great, but for now I just want to see what I can do on my own.
 

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Roadkill,

Since sandpaper is a new subject to you, just a couple of hints:

80 grit is NOT what you want.

If you've got a decent coat with no runs or anything, start with 800. I'm partial to the 3M wet-or-dry. Tear off a little piece, maybe 1.5 inch square, and get a little dish with some clean water. Wet the sandpaper and start in the center of a bodypanel. Use a circular motion and light pressure. Stop every so often, dry it off with a clean rag, and look at the surface in the light. When it looks even all over, progress to the next grit. Proceed with 1000, 1200, 1500 and 2000, though you can usually get away with 1500. Finish off with a fine rubbing compound and polish.

Other tips -
You want to start with the finest grit you can to level off the finish - remember you have to sand out all the 1000 scratches with the 1200, all the 1200 scratches with the 1500, etc.

Stay away from edges - it's really easy to sand through. Sand-through means more paint.

Use clean water for each grit so loose 800 grit isn't floating around scratching your 1500 sanding.

"Read" the information coming through your fingertips. If the paper is grabby, use more water. You'll soon be able to tell when the paper is worn out by the feel it gives. It doesn't last long.

Use a firm foam block for larger areas, fingers for areas with tight contours. There's no place on a slotcar you'd likely use a hard sanding block.

Patience and practice!

Painting tip - set your spray cans in warm tap water for a few minutes before spraying. Swirl, don't shake them (I was told shaking puts bubbles in the paint but do they come out the nozzle?). Many light coats, not few heavy coats.

I haven't done many model paint jobs, but I used to do lots of wetsanding when I worked in a guitar shop!

Hope this helps,
capn
 

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mac pinches
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it looks as if we all travel along the same road on this one, with slight variations, just to add my thoughts, give the basis shell a swill in washing up liquide to remove any grease etc, dry off, as was stated i tend to warm the spray cans in warm water,this gives a finer spray, use white, grey or black primer to suit the cars finnish, if you are after an odd tint, the 1-1 car paint supplers now make up spray cans, take along a picture of your car and they will match it exactly. 2 or 3 light coats of finishing paint, to get a good finish i use T_CUT liquid car polish, this gives a glasslike finish, again dont go through to the resin/plastic cheers mac p
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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Wet'n'dry rubbing paper is old hat. Use fine wire wool. gets into the tiny bits easier and creates a super-fine rub. You can get packs of differing 'grades' for more heavy-duty work, but the finest is excellent.

Autopaint tends to be a bit 'heavy' in my experience, but it is cheap and produces great results. Modelling enamel sprays are easier to get a perfect detailed finish with that has a good 'scale' appearance, but it's difficult to find one that does primer, topcoat and clearcoat that suits all decals, actually produces a rockhard finish and will not yellow in time. Plastikote enamel is the closest I've found but even that goes yellow with whites. Also, has a limited colour range.

Tamiya does creat colours, but clearcote destoys most slotcar waterslide decals.
 
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