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i have scx raid trucks and scx rally cars and scalextric how do you tune them for rally ?
 

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I don't know if this is going to answer your question, but this is what I've done with my current collection. I'd like to get them to drive as realistically as possible. The cars only get used on Scalextric Sport track. For now, the rally cars I have are........
SCX Alpine Renault A110
SCX Escort mkII
SCX Sierra Cosworth
SCX Lancia Delta Integrale
Scalextric Renault Megane Maxi
Scalextric Subaru Impreza WRC 97
SCX Toyota Corolla WRC
SCX SEAT Ibiza

From a realism point of view the Megane, Impreza, and Ibiza are "wrong wheel drive". So far, I've found this difficult to overcome, particularly in the case of the Impreza.

The Alpine Renault, Escort and Sierra, being RWD, aren't too bad. On these all I've done is remove the magnet and stuck an aftermarket mag in front of the motor. Now, they drive with plenty of tail-out action but the added mag stops them from de-slotting too much. I've stuck to standard tyres on these 3.

The 'Grale and Corolla, being 4WD are have different requirements. Although there's room to put mags ahead of the motor, the mag gets attracted to the front driveshaft. So I've kept the rear-mounted mags, but screwed them in as far as they can go. Again, I've kept to standard tyres on these. I get some tail-out, but the 4WD keeps the car straighter and the small amount of mag attraction reduces the tendency to de-slot.

Now we come to the difficult ones - the Megane, Ibiza and Impreza. Again, I've put aftermarket mags ahead of the motors, but for added realism, the Megane keeps its factory-fit (weak) rear mag and has ZeroGrip tyres on the front and Slot.It P6s on the rear. The Ibiza has the same set-up, but minus its original mag. Both these will drift if pushed hard, but other wise drive as close as I can get them to a 1:1 FWD car. The Impreza is a totally different kettle of fish. No matter what I do to it, it either drives too much like an RWD car or if I fit the aftermarket mag behind the motor, rather than in front, it just stays planted all the time. I've tried standard, P2, P6 and urethane tyres on it. I'm going to give-up on this one and get a 4WD SCX version.

I'll hang-on to the Megane and Ibiza, I won't buy any more rally cars which are FWD in 1:1, or not 4WD when they should be.

I hope this is reasonably clear, and of some help to you.

Stuart.
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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Ryan: you don't mention IF you are driving on a routed track or plastic.Rally track or a circuit. This info would help people give you some relative information.
 

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Hi,
This could help - it's some information on basic tuning tips that I have translated from an article that a Spanish friend of mine was working on.
It's a kind of beginners' guide for SCX classic rally cars. BTW it's called Getting Started so really aimed at the true novice I suppose.

Nowadays it's not necessary to make a lot of modifications before you can start enjoying a new model. More and more manufacturers make ready-to-run models which need to be only slightly tweeked. Here are some ideas based on a standard SCX (or Spanish Scalextric) model like the Renault 8.

1. The magnet - should really be removed, but that's a personal opinion. Non-magnetic racing is much more enjoyable and there's more of a 'skill-factor' involved.
(FB - this could get bit of a debate going!!!)

2. The guide - take off about 0.5/1mm from the bottom of the guide (this stops it touching the plastic bits which are directly under the slot) and sand down on either side (to reduce the risk of getting stuck, especially on old track).

3. The tyres - the front tyres should be 'thinner/smaller' than the rear tyres so that the car doesn't decide to go straight instead of turning: the car will sit lower at the front ensuring that the guide enters the slot completely. On RWD models it's easier to sand down the rear tyres and then swap them with the front ones.

Note: For other cars with standard hubs, it's possible to buy special low-profile tyres which saves on sandpaper.

4. The crown - people often complain about the noise with new cars which is due to the bad meshing of the crown and the pinion. It is possible to buy higher quality crowns from a number of manufacturers to avoid this. If you prefer to stick with the original, oiling from time to time will help. One other method is to apply heat (usually with a lighter) to the crown while it is spinning. This will soften the plastic and then it should start to mesh better, thereby reducing the noise. Don't overdo this or you'll end up with
a ruined crown! Of course in time the noise will gradually lessen, anyway.

5. The shell - some people manage to lighten the shell by sanding down on the inside or removing unwanted stuff, like the lights. A lighter shell means the car will be faster - it's a question of physics. Also people like to loosen the screws so that the shell 'wobbles' - this also improves the laptimes but it's a bit complicated as to why this happens. Some people have suggested that it helps on cornering in that some of the centrifugal inertia is 'absorbed' by this wobbling and so you can go that bit faster around the corner
without the car tipping over.

6. Choice of track - tracks come with a fairly wide variety of grip. Again it's a question of personal taste but with this model (narrow, with a high centre of gravity) a grippy track like Ninco would be more critical, whereas a less grippy surface would allow for more back-end slide, and would probably be more fun.

Personally, I think this info is basically sound. Perhaps the problems with poorly aligned plastic rims has been overlooked - usually the first thing I want to change!

Well, hope this is useful.


FB
 

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QUOTE (FenderBender @ 31 Jul 2011, 10:45) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>5. The shell - some people manage to lighten the shell by sanding down on the inside or removing unwanted stuff, like the lights. A lighter shell means the car will be faster - it's a question of physics. Also people like to loosen the screws so that the shell 'wobbles' - this also improves the laptimes but it's a bit complicated as to why this happens. Some people have suggested that it helps on cornering in that some of the centrifugal inertia is 'absorbed' by this wobbling and so you can go that bit faster around the corner
without the car tipping over.

I've noticed several members at my local club have lightened the driver's tray and then added a small piece of lead to the underside. This is new to me and something I need to try as these guys are quick.
 

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Tom Brown (Scorpus Flex)
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I have never heard of doing that before I would have thought the weight would have been better lower down.

I think sanding the inside of cars is a bit extreme unless you have a really top heavy resin kit. You could just always run a convertable
 
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