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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I build my rally loop, I'd prefer it if it isn't either totally flat or just has a couple of shallow gradiant flyovers in. The track is going to be a mix of Scalextric classic and Sport, with SCX loops.

I'm toying with the idea of having at least one Scalectric leap, so that's a start. Something like the humpback bridge appeals, and the same in reverse (a dip), but I'd like to be able to have the bumps, dips, climbs and drops in all types of track, not just standard straights.

I realise that the ground clearance of the cars is going to dictate the severity of any humps and dips, but what, if any are my options? I'm not bothered if the cars bottom a bit - hey! they're rally cars - but obviously I don't want it to be so bad that they de-slot all the time.

Can it be done? If so, how? I've got plenty of spare classic track I can experiment on.

TIA
Stuart.
 

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It an be done, obviously there's the old Scalextric Hump back bridge and SCX do a bridge that can also ba a dip, have a look at the SCX off road and raid track as well.
Classic track can be bent into shape, just be careful of the rails bending into the slot, good luck.
 

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If the rails bend in you can bend them out again using a big flat head screwdriver. The trick with bending scalextric classic track is to make lots of little bends instead of one big one - that way its gradual instead of abrupt. Put your two thumbs close together on the rails, facing each other on the top of the track then slowly increase the bending pressure until you get a small deformation. Then move a short distance along and do it again.
 

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Yes it can be done and clearance is less of an issue than you might think. I've just been trying out my Scalextric Porsche 996 on a VERY steep slope with a Radius 1 hairpin at the top to see if it will work on this track at the Farnham Slot Rally GB this weekend:



I think it will be OK, although the change of camber at the top might be too much to ask.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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It is possible to manipulate Scalex track to give you some flexibility in camber and climb. I've got some quite considerable ones in my track, but given that it is a road based track I haven't pushed things to an extreme.



Some have achieved some extreme results by baking the track to set the curvature they desire. Mr Flippant will be able to explain the baking method. A member of his club has used it to set a considerable rise over a full straight.

There is, however, a simple method that takes only time and patience. Unfortunately it is easier to do than describe, but I will try.

The thing to remember is that you are trying to compress one surface of the track while stretching the other side. So for a hump one is stretching the road surface while compressing the underneath. Probably the easiest way to do this is balance the piece of track over both thumbs and with the fingers and a stroking motion gently pull the top of the track over and down while drawing the thumbs together. It sounds silly, but the idea is simply to coax and massage the track into the shape you want it. If necessary the track can be warmed slightly by placing it in front of the heater for a little while, or warm it gently with a hair dryer. Patience is important. It may even be necessary to work over several sessions.

As I said, it's harder to explain than it is to do. But persevere. It works. And it's something you can do while sitting in front of the telly if you don't mind looking odd.


Embs
 

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Tom Brown (Scorpus Flex)
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if your car has a drop arm or sprung guide it should be able to take on any dips and cambers and stuff.

if you using classic track there is also the curved bends (forgot proper name) , skid chicane, bump track bit, and a few other bits of specialist track.
 

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QUOTE (ironman @ 23 Sep 2011, 12:16) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>if your car has a drop arm or sprung guide it should be able to take on any dips and cambers and stuff.

Should but possibly won't! On my pic of Farnham the red crosses mark where the combined elevation and camber changes asked a bit too much of some cars on the SCX Proxy. Green crosses mark where some chassis got beached. Generally SCX cars are great at that stuff, but not all... but you're 100% right that a drop arm would solve 99.9% of problems on a course like this.
 

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if you're serious about rally, you must consider Ninco track as well. Ninco off road track is pretty driveable, whereas SCX is too rough for most cars(Scalextric rally cars will have a very difficult time on SCX). Ninco hump track sections are very good, I've got some that I've sanded down the roughness on. There is a conversion section for Ninco to Classic/SCX.
 

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Kev
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Driver#8,
i think i recognise that box??

Did it used to house BoxMountain?

Old thread can be seen here.

StuBeeDoo,
You can get a surprising amount of of elevation and dip in quite a tight space.
Scaley classic track is ideal for cutting up and experimenting.
I would try and get every join as smooth as possible though for best car performance. Sometimes this means using lots of short sections instead of 1 standard section.
You don't want the braids lifting out the slot, because the centre of the chassis is grounded.

Some great info already offered above by others. Hope the link proves helpful.
Have fun, and let us see what you get up to.
 

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Tom Brown (Scorpus Flex)
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QUOTE (driver#8 @ 23 Sep 2011, 11:56) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Should but possibly won't! On my pic of Farnham the red crosses mark where the combined elevation and camber changes asked a bit too much of some cars on the SCX Proxy. Green crosses mark where some chassis got beached. Generally SCX cars are great at that stuff, but not all... but you're 100% right that a drop arm would solve 99.9% of problems on a course like this.

some scx cars are better than others at rallying i think the renault 5 is probably the best ive seen at handling any situation

QUOTE (Ember @ 23 Sep 2011, 12:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>But a drop arm will cause issues on the proposed jump.

we have jumps on the tscc track the drop arm helps rather than hinders i suppose it depends how much air you can get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks everyone for the input here. Plenty for me to be thinking about.


I'll certainly be having a look at the Ninco track and the SCX bridge will be getting added to the wish list but I don't think the drop arms will be for me.
 

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At our rally club we are well into the whole humps and hills thing but of course the golden rule is make sure the cars are able to get round the track without coming off BEFORE you start nailing down the track. We use a standard Ninco C4 - straight out of the box - magnet removed - assuming that if it can handle the track anything can - in terms of rally cars I mean. Then of course you get some speed merchant who comes along with a Ferrari 360 and ends up having huge problems. They are after all, GT cars dressed up as rally cars, and don't have the clearance for anything less than a dead flat track. Hard titty, I say!

If you think about a flat track and then an off-road raid track, then we could imagine that a rally track is a kind of happy middle ground between the two. Humps and hills add realism but as I said, they have to be negociable or you will end up frustrated as will others who use your layout.

Cars/trucks with drop arm guides can handle some really incredible situations but if a normal SCX or Ninco is having problems you need to re-design. The small amount of guide play on these cars should be enough.

One more point to add perhaps is that we race to the clock not with two cars at the same time. This means that one lane of the track is actually dead. In this way, all the curves are designed so that the cars take the inner lane (very often with a crossover just before). This helps in the design as you don't have to worry about the car being able to handle both lanes. A zig-zag hairpin affair either going up or coming down is quite spectacular with the cars switching to the inside lane just before the curve.

The track below was for a Tour de Corse and so had to be hilly, twisty etc. It looks diabolical but it worked fine. Some of the curves and hills were quite severe but only the real novices who came along had any difficulties.

Cheers

FB

Corsica.jpg
 

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